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Receiving LP DTV at the bottom of a hill.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hello all. I'm just wondering if anyone can offer some advice in receiving low power stations. I'm relatively new to the world of OTA reception (until the transition, we pretty much just had cable), and I'm intrigued by the idea of receiving low power stations. My biggest problem isn't the relative distance of the LP towers, but that I live at the bottom of a hill. Given that I'm living with my family for the summer between semesters, I don't think I'll have the opportunity (or permission) to install a roof mounted antenna.

The hill is a big enough obstacle that TV Fool rates all the LP stations (and one full-power station) as blue on the coverage maps for my part of St. Paul (MN). Is there anything I can do that's somewhat inexpensive, and easy to take with me when I return to school for the next couple of months, or is what I ask impossible?

Thanks guys!
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
From what I've read, the station can decide if it goes analog or digital. According to TV Fool (bitly URL: ePKie), most of the stations in my area are digital. Almost all of them are UHF (and I have an amplified antenna, the GE model 24700 (bitly URL: 16yna0), an indoor antenna with VHF rabbit-ears).

Here are the signals I can actually pull in:
  • KTCA-DT (2.1, 2.2)
  • KTCI-TV (2.3, 2.4)
  • WCCO-DT (4.1)
  • KTSC-DT (45.1) - According to TitanTV, they're supposed to have an "HDNet" subchannel 45.2, but I can't find it
  • KSTP-DT (5.1, 5.2)
  • WTFC-DT (29.1, 29.2)
  • WUCW (23.1, 23.2)
  • KMSP (9.1, 9.2)
  • KARE (11.1, 11.2)
  • KHVM-LD (28.1)

The only stations I have problems with are KMSP and KARE, both of which are VHF-Hi. Most of the time, I can pull them in if I fiddle with my rabbit ears. It's just a matter of finding the right positioning.

I understand that since these stations have 2-Edge antennas, and are rather low power, I'm going to need to employ some voodoo to get things in, but I'm just wondering if it's
  1. Feasible
  2. Inexpensive
  3. Can be done without products needing to be mounted on my roof
post #3 of 7
All of the stations you listed are digial as indicated by the fact that they have are digital sub-channels -1, -2 etc. Have you also tried an analog tuner to see if you can receive any low powered analog stations?
What does the TV fool map data look like for where you go to school in the fall?
post #4 of 7
Ken,

KHVM is a low power station. The "LD" stands for low power digital.

Nonetheless, there don't seem to be any low power analog stations on this list.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimboG View Post

Ken,

KHVM is a low power station. The "LD" stands for low power digital.

Thanks for the correction, topic title changed. Again.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by walford View Post

All of the stations you listed are digial as indicated by the fact that they have are digital sub-channels -1, -2 etc. Have you also tried an analog tuner to see if you can receive any low powered analog stations?
What does the TV fool map data look like for where you go to school in the fall?

Well, I'm going to school in New Jersey. The coverage stats from TV Fool can be seen at this BitLy URL: EG5rI - The area around me is pretty flat, so all I have to worry about are a trees... lots and lots of trees (South Jersey is practically a forest in places). One of my concerns is that not all of the transmitters are in a straight line, which would make using a DVR a little annoying. Why couldn't someone have invented something like DiSEqC for VHF/UHF antennas?

It's interesting to me that there is both a WELL-LP and a WELL-CA. I didn't know callsigns could be assigned like that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimboG View Post

Nonetheless, there don't seem to be any low power analog stations on this list.

Yeah, that's something I noticed too. I'm kind of surprised in that the DTV transition was optional, and this means spending more money on hardware that they might not be able to afford. My guess is that their engineer was aware that a lot of DTV Converter boxes don't have analog pass-through.
post #7 of 7
The following link will answer your question: They changed the call sign

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WELL-CA
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