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Making your own VGA => Component video adapter.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hope this is posted to the correct section....

I have a high degree of electronics background, and work with computers as a part of my job. I'm a DIY'er for the simple fact that many things that you purchase aren't worth the $'s they ask for it. Take for example my latest project...connecting my laptop to my SHARP Aquous (1080p) screen... the cable I've located, delivered, would run my $65.00 CAD. For a hunk of wire that doesn't do any converting, that's pretty dear. Also, the fact that I live in rural Ontario means I don't have 52 different sources for this kind of stuff, most store employees look at me with that deer-in-the-headlights look when I ask for something specific. Go Fig...

I gave the cable a shot today, since I had a spare (or several) VGA cable kicking about and more than enough wobby-pops to see me through the afternoon. I also have an endless supply of RCA-terminated audio cables to sacrifice as well. After checking continuity and verifiying pinout for DB15 connector, I got to cutting and soldering. Once again verified no shorts and continuity where I wanted it. Not the prettiest job, but heck it's just a "rough draft" - should it work I can tidy it up.

Verified laptop was able to display picture on external monitor and then hooked up my franken-cable. 1st go didn't produce a picture, and laptop didn't recognize the presence of an external screen. That of course makes sense since I haven't wired in a connection for the screen to "talk" to the laptop. Using an a/b/c box I kept switching between known working sources and the franke-cable, still nothing. I realized that I didn't have and sync going to the screen, which it might need. From my days with an A/V company, I know to fallback to sync-on-green. So I started experimenting (due to laziness at this point) with the "extra" leads poking out of the end of the cable I hacked up. Eventually I managed to get an "UNKNOW" monitor detected by connecting the brown wire to the green video lead. Still didnt get a picture. I'm not sure if this is due to hardware incompatibility or some s/w issue I haven't fully covered yet.

Oh the other kink in this whole thing...the laptop ( an ACER ASPIRE 5100 - ATI video adapter / AMD CPU)... is runing Ubuntu 9.04. Which might make using the "powerstrip" s/w I keep reading about next to difficult.

Thanks for the read, look forward to input ( literally!!)

Steve
post #2 of 17
Quote:


I have a high degree of electronics background, and work with computers as a part of my job.

Then I'm sure you're aware that VGA (RGBHV) is not the same as component (Y {with composite sync} R-Y, B-Y)
You need a transcoder to convert RGB to component.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by duvetyne View Post

Then I'm sure you're aware that VGA (RGBHV) is not the same as component (Y {with composite sync} R-Y, B-Y)
You need a transcoder to convert RGB to component.

See that's where I've been getting conflicting information. VGA to component cables are readily available, and it has been suggested that VGA and component are both analog signals, a converter wouldn't be required. perhaps being a cheap@$$, I was hoping this would be a simple matter of getting the hardware right...


S~
post #4 of 17
Quote:


VGA to component cables are readily available

...for devices that are capable of outputting a component signal on a VGA connector.

Quote:


and it has been suggested that VGA and component are both analog signals,

Yes, they are. They're also very different. Composite video and analog audio are both analog signals, they're not interchangable though.
RGB consists of three signals representing the luminence values of the RGand B content of a scene.
Component consists of a luminence signal (Y) which is the weighted sum of RG and B.
the two colour difference signals (R-Y and B-Y) represent G+B (cyan) and R+G (yellow), using simple algebra these signals can be 'decoded' back into RGB.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok then, so the "simple" cable is not enough to get a laptop's VGA up and out into a TV screen. Well there's no harm in hoping.

Can't remember the brand of converter I used to use when I worked for AVW....Furmann, Fishman....whatever. That would be the ticket, but alas not in my budget....LOL.

Tx for the enlightenment though....

Steve.
post #6 of 17
How old is the laptop?....it "might" be capable of component out.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
...age, well hard to know exactly, no more than 4 years. more likely 2 or 3....

Under Windows capabilities might be different, but I'm running Ubuntu 9.04
post #8 of 17
I found my Key Digital transcoder for ~$25 shipped off of ebay. It will convert VGA to component with a VGA pass-thru. I know they also have a model that will do the opposite. The model # is KD-VTCA3
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by minimustangs09 View Post

...age, well hard to know exactly, no more than 4 years. more likely 2 or 3....

Under Windows capabilities might be different, but I'm running Ubuntu 9.04

Unlikely. YOu need a RGB to Component transcoder, there are some out there that are not very expensive. You should take care to see what component colorspace it utilizes, either 601 or 709, if you are concerned about color accuracy.
post #10 of 17
Been googling. I have no interest in three component, svideo, or high def. Only composite.

So, I have seen no luck in watching a movie on a single rca component for under $150. This "key" brand converter goes for about 180 usd. Radio shack has something for a hundred plus about 50 for cables. I think getting old outdated video card but then I loose my main computer and need to buy about a hundred usd in converters and cables. Again, Best buy doesn't have interest in satifying this need if they cant get three hundred for such a project. And they know once this becomes popular someone will under cut them for $3.

So, I too was wondering how to take my acer laptop and convert the vga to rca (single rca composite) with windows xp, though.

I am pretty irritated there isnt a simple local $20 solution, knowing there isn't a computer owner out there that wouldn't be interested.
post #11 of 17
Several things are intermixed here. One, VGA to component does not happen in a single cable.

VGA HD-15 adapted to breakout cables is NOT component. There are 5 cables in a VGA breakout- red, green , blue Hsync and Vsync.

The manufacturer you are probably thinking about being used at AVW was probably Faroudja. High dollar stuff.

You can buy computer video output cards with a S-Video output and a composite video output. I am using 2 right now for a church installation.

Check Calrad for inexpensive VGA to component transcoders.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by degarb View Post

...Best buy doesn't have interest in satifying this need if they cant get three hundred for such a project. And they know once this becomes popular someone will under cut them for $3.

Best Buy doesn't have an interest because they cannot make money on it.

Quote:


I am pretty irritated there isnt a simple local $20 solution, knowing there isn't a computer owner out there that wouldn't be interested.

I own more than one computer and have absolutely no interest in such a device, nor does any other computer owner I know. But there is a small market for such a device and solution close to $20:

Look here.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist View Post

Several things are intermixed here. One, VGA to component does not happen in a single cable.

VGA HD-15 adapted to breakout cables is NOT component. There are 5 cables in a VGA breakout- red, green , blue Hsync and Vsync.

The manufacturer you are probably thinking about being used at AVW was probably Faroudja. High dollar stuff.

You can buy computer video output cards with a S-Video output and a composite video output. I am using 2 right now for a church installation.

Check Calrad for inexpensive VGA to component transcoders.

Key word is reasonable price (above 50 including needed converter and cable, is a put off); by Calrad, do you mean:http://www.arcade-electronics.com/calrad.aspx ?

Too bad you cant just splice a vga cable, and combine the component rgb pins to middle composite prong and ground outer. But if I need to buy some intermediate box, fine, but what is out there?

Got thousands of online free movies from countries across the world. Why would anyone get cable or the dish? Plus,-not counting Netflix-- all of us can get all the free dvds all day long, as long as I get them back in time. But It takes us 3 weeks to watch one dvd, unless the mood strikes. Thus trying to "cache"/check for read errors and transmit wirelessly to acer laptop. Great for in bed watching, but no way to put on tv. I suppose one wouldn't be interested if they didn't care about money/contracts, were unaware of the alternatives, or never ever watched movies or tv.
post #14 of 17
Just go to Calrad.com. Arcade is a Calrad distributor.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by degarb View Post

Been googling. I have no interest in three component, svideo, or high def. I think these formats are for immature people that forget that content matters.

So, I have seen no luck in watching a movie on a single rca component for under $150. This key brand converter goes for about 180 usd. Radio shack has something for a hundred plus about 50 for cables. I think getting old outdated video card but then I loose my main computer and need to buy about a hundred in converters and cables. Again, Best buy doesnt have interest in satifying this need if they cant get three hundred for such a project. And they know once this becomes popular someone will under cut them for $3.

So, I too was wondering how to take my acer laptop and convert the vga to rca (single rca) with windows xp, though.

I am pretty irritated there isnt a simple local $20 solution, knowing there isn't a computer owner out there that wouldn't be interested.

Huh?
Start your own topic. This thread was started to discuss VGA-Component, not VGA-Composite.
post #16 of 17
I joined just to reply on this thread, everyone here sounds much more educated on this topic, but I'm no dummy and it is possible to splice your VGA cable to component. I have made a VGA/component cable and i turned a scart/component into a scart/vga . both work fine on my monitor and tv. But its all gonna depend on your device. Simply splice into pins 1,2,3,6,7,8.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
I joined just to reply on this thread,

You joined to reply to a 4 year old thread?
Quote:
I'm no dummy and it is possible to splice your VGA cable to component.

No it isn't....it's already been explained in this thread...read it.
Quote:
But its all gonna depend on your device.

Yes, as already explained, the device has to be capable of outputting component.

You say you're no dummy, then you contradict your self.
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AVS › AVS Forum › A/V Control & Automation › Tweaks and Do-It-Yourself › Making your own VGA => Component video adapter.