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Plasma Break-In (Slides/DVD): Purposeful or Pointless? - Page 2

post #31 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by smjbh5 View Post

Watching TV (full screen) also helps it age evenly!

No it doesn't as content is focused towards the center of the screen.

If you want uniform aging, you will have to use a medium that presents each sub pixel exactly the same content.
post #32 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

If you want uniform aging, you will have to use a medium that presents each sub pixel exactly the same content.

Wouldn't watching as you normally would (but avoiding 4:3 content) over the initial 100-150 hrs eventually average out to evenly age the phosphors?
post #33 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

No it doesn't as content is focused towards the center of the screen.

If you want uniform aging, you will have to use a medium that presents each sub pixel exactly the same content.

but does it even matter if you're not getting a professional calibration?
post #34 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by speck9 View Post

but does it even matter if you're not getting a professional calibration?

Nope
post #35 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

No it doesn't as content is focused towards the center of the screen.

If you want uniform aging, you will have to use a medium that presents each sub pixel exactly the same content.


Over a period it will even out i think. What Panasonic says is if you don't worry about CRT you should worry about Plasma
post #36 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by vkarthik View Post

Over a period it will even out i think.

Get some measurment equipment and measure the light output of a PDP per multiple sections of its screen after it has accumulated a few thousand hours and see what you find

Quote:
What Panasonic says is if you don't worry about CRT you should worry about Plasma

That blurb is dealing with burn-in which the break-in slides/dvd have absolutely nothing to do with in 2009.
post #37 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

Get some measurment equipment and measure the light output of a PDP per multiple sections of its screen after it has accumulated a few thousand hours and see what you find

Am I missing something here? If the display has had hundreds of hours of content that completely fills the screen, won't all of the pixels be more-or-less evenly aged?
post #38 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajvandenb View Post

Am I missing something here? If the display has had hundreds of hours of content that completely fills the screen, won't all of the pixels be more-or-less evenly aged?

In the above scenario, does each pixel "see" exactly the same content at the same brightness intensity? When you answer that question you will have the answer to your question above
post #39 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

Get some measurment equipment and measure the light output of a PDP per multiple sections of its screen after it has 9.

Something we cannot avoid . We cannot be watching slides all our life for its uniform aging. Just kidding. It is impossible to have uniformity. It is like someone saying when you buy a new car " you should make sure ratio of your right turns and left turns is always one "
post #40 of 129
Hey, how about we add a poll to this thread.


Plasma break-in slides are:
  1. Totally pointless
  2. Pointless unless you plan to calibrate
  3. Great way to get quickly through the initial 100 hours.
  4. What's plasma break-in?
post #41 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by panabolic View Post

Hey, how about we add a poll to this thread.


Plasma break-in slides are:
  1. Totally pointless
  2. Pointless unless you plan to calibrate
  3. Great way to get quickly through the initial 100 hours.
  4. What's plasma break-in?

Now this would be pointless

Its clear that some like the benefits of using the break-in DVD/slides... per already defined purposes (not IR/Burn-in prevention) and others dont see the point of it. The only thing that really matters is everyone respects the other's choice. I know this is quite hard for a certain person due to emotional issues however, I don't see why everyone else cannot do it.
post #42 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

In the above scenario, does each pixel "see" exactly the same content at the same brightness intensity? When you answer that question you will have the answer to your question above

Huh? Why wouldn't each pixel averaged over time see the same brightness intensity over the entire screen? By the "above scenario" do you mean content filling the entire screen? If so, then I don't see why there would being any differences in light output across pixels. Perhaps we aren't speaking about the same scenario.
post #43 of 129
some people have got IR even after break-in. You can get IR even after long time.

This is their Notes on page 7. They don't mention how long we have to do this. But going by the experience with all the anti-burn-in features probability of having IR after 100 hours break-in is less.

DO NOT DISPLAY A STILL PICTURE FOR A LONG TIME

This causes the image to remain on the plasma screen. This is not considered a malfunction and is not covered by the warranty. To prevent "image retention", the screen saver is automatically activated after a few minutes if no signals are sent or no operations are performed

Typical Still images

* Channel Number and other logs
* Image displayed in 4:3 mode
* SD Card photo
* Video game
* Computer Image
post #44 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajvandenb View Post

Huh? Why wouldn't each pixel averaged over time see the same brightness intensity over the entire screen?

Averaged over time? If all content made for TV has a focal point of the screen's center, how would the pixels on the far left, right, top and bottom age at the same rate as the pixels in the center? You do realize that when content is focused at the center of the screen, the center will see more "pixel action" compared the other portions of the screen, right?


Quote:
By the "above scenario" do you mean content filling the entire screen?

I meant your post... aka watching regular TV.
post #45 of 129
I didn't worry to much about the break-in period on my Plasma. I just lowered the picture brightness and contrast (following suggested settings from this site) and kept the aspect ratio filled.
My only concern were CNN crawls and Sports crawls, I usually zoomed in. In any case I'm way past the break-in period without problems.
post #46 of 129
I would bet my set that if you took 3 sets out of a box and for 150 hrs

Set 1 ran slides
Set two was left on for 150 hrs straight with full screen content
Set three was viewed normally with care to not cause burn in.

All three afterwards would measure same darkest darks, brightest brights and would calibrate EXACTLY the same barring tolerances of plus an minus panasonics spec percentages.

All of this stuff is complete and total nonsense. And the fact that an ISF certified tech is driving this is sketchy at best.
post #47 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

Averaged over time? If all content made for TV has a focal point of the screen's center, how would the pixels on the far left, right, top and bottom age at the same rate as the pixels in the center? You do realize that when content is focused at the center of the screen, the center will see more "pixel action" compared the other portions of the screen, right?

Hmmm, no didn't realize this and this is very interesting. Thanks for the lesson So because the "action" is focused usually on a subject in the middle of the screen (in TV and movies) these pixels get more "work" and thus will age more quickly than those toward the edges of the screen. Good to know. So I guess you have seen this on actual sets?

edit: So this has nothing to do with bars on the left and right with 4:3 content and top and bottom with widescreen movies? Or is this the uneven pixel use that you are referring to?
post #48 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by serialmike View Post

I would bet my set that if you took 3 sets out of a box and for 150 hrs

Set 1 ran slides
Set two was left on for 150 hrs straight with full screen content
Set three was viewed normally with care to not cause burn in.

All three afterwards would measure same darkest darks, brightest brights and would calibrate EXACTLY the same barring tolerances of plus an minus panasonics spec percentages.

All of this stuff is complete and total nonsense. And the fact that an ISF certified tech is driving this is sketchy at best.

Anytime you want to try this, come down to South Carolina and I'll personally show you what would happen. I can backup what I know and endorse.

I advise people to use the break-in DVD/Slides for a very specific reason based on the hard data that I've accumulated (and it has absolutely nothing to do with IR/Burn-in prevention). If you choose not to do the break-in with a DVD or slides, thats your choice. However, respect those who do choose to do it.


BTW, the correct way to do your test is to measure the panels immediately out of the box and then after 150 hours so that you can account for the original panel variances post 150 hours.
post #49 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

BTW, the correct way to do your test is to measure the panels immediately out of the box and then after 150 hours so that you can account for the original panel variances post 150 hours.


True, Scientifically speaking.

Also true is that while 150 hrs in the lifetime of the set is a small portion of the wear of the phosphers. Yes they wear faster in this time frame. This still winds up being an small portion of overall wear and inconsequential in the end.

So while the phospors may be worn to exact spec with sliders at 150. and not 100 percent even with other methods. By the time a user reaches 1000-2000 and onward it just plain doesnt matter.

All the sets will be identical within panasonics spec by the time a few months goes by.

The only benefit the slider method provides mathmatically speaking is if Dnice is coming to your house to calibrate the set when it has 150 hrs on it he could get the set to look almost exactly like the original barring tolerance descrepancies. Other than that no one, and I do mean no one on this planet is ever ever going to know that two panasonic g10 models that are the same size were ever broken in differently without a meter byt the time a couple of months of viewing has passed.

Where are you on SoCo. I will be coming down that way eventually as my parents are retiring there near columbia soon
post #50 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajvandenb View Post

So this has nothing to do with bars on the left and right with 4:3 content and top and bottom with widescreen movies? Or is this the uneven pixel use that you are referring to?


It has a little to do with that. Just sit in front of your tv and flip through the channels for a little while. Even on HD channels there are still commercials with black bars on the sides and sometimes top and bottom. Add to that the black crawler that every sports broadcast seems to have to have at the bottom now (anyone remember back when it was on ESPN2 only?) Then take a look at other programming and notice that the majority of the "action" is in an oval shaped area centered on the display. The corners of the content are often much darker than the focused content in the center. Magnified over time, the phosphors near the center will have been aged much more than the edges and corners.
post #51 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

No it doesn't as content is focused towards the center of the screen.

If you want uniform aging, you will have to use a medium that presents each sub pixel exactly the same content.

I understand that the center of the screen get more of the pixel action, and that running the break-in slides/dvd will probably age the pixels evenly (cause each pixel see the same amount of action). But what happens after the 150 hours? We're back to the middle getting all the action again. Won't this cause uneven aging after the 150 hour mark? Or is it not a concern after 150 hours?
post #52 of 129
I wonder how many of you guys have played cricket. When you buy a new cricket bat we usually have to season the bat for 6 to 10 hours depending on the manufacturer. You have to apply right amount of linseed oil on the specified area then you have to take a wooden hammer and knock it with your hand all around the meat part of the bat with your hand. It is a painful process. This is called knocking-in. It has to be done carefully to get the maximum out of the bat. I did it for 3 or 4 hours. My hands became sore. But the bat got better.
Similarly i don't mind putting hours in breaking-in my plasma. I don't really have to do anything manually here except "watching regular programs in full screen mode" and running slides. Too bad there are only 24 hours in a day
post #53 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Hawk View Post

It has a little to do with that. Just sit in front of your tv and flip through the channels for a little while. Even on HD channels there are still commercials with black bars on the sides and sometimes top and bottom. Add to that the black crawler that every sports broadcast seems to have to have at the bottom now (anyone remember back when it was on ESPN2 only?) Then take a look at other programming and notice that the majority of the "action" is in an oval shaped area centered on the display. The corners of the content are often much darker than the focused content in the center. Magnified over time, the phosphors near the center will have been aged much more than the edges and corners.

Thanks, now it makes more sense .
post #54 of 129
What are these slides that folks are running? Just curious. Link?
post #55 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by smjbh5 View Post

I understand that the center of the screen get more of the pixel action, and that running the break-in slides/dvd will probably age the pixels evenly (cause each pixel see the same amount of action). But what happens after the 150 hours? We're back to the middle getting all the action again. Won't this cause uneven aging after the 150 hour mark? Or is it not a concern after 150 hours?

Great question...
post #56 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by smjbh5 View Post

What are these slides that folks are running? Just curious. Link?

http://www.eaprogramming.com/

Burn it in a dvd and let it play. Basic idea is to fill the screen with different and uniform colors. Every 25 or 30 seconds it will change to new color. You just have let it run over 100 hours. Some say 120 hours. I don't know how they come up with number 120 hours. Does it mean nothing will happen on 121st hour? Don't know the answer. But Panasonic says 100 hours.

Idea is to fill the screen with moving images.
post #57 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by vkarthik View Post

http://www.eaprogramming.com/

Burn it in a dvd and let it play. Basic idea is to fill the screen with different and uniform colors. Every 25 or 30 seconds it will change to new color. You just have let it run over 100 hours. Some say 120 hours. I don't know how they come up with number 120 hours. Does it mean nothing will happen on 121st hour? Don't know the answer. But Panasonic says 100 hours.

Idea is to fill the screen with moving images.

Is there something that could be run off a USB stick? Does this have to be running constantly for 100 hours?

Panasonic says that the tv should be broken in? I don't think Samsung says anything like that.
post #58 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by smjbh5 View Post

But what happens after the 150 hours? We're back to the middle getting all the action again. Won't this cause uneven aging after the 150 hour mark? Or is it not a concern after 150 hours?

Yep back to the uneven aging, but beyond the most volatile time of a plasma's life. Again, the dvd/slides have their purpose, but it is not for IR/Burn-in prevention or any other myth. Use them if you plan on using my free settings or to evenly age the phosphors during the first 1xx hours of its lifetime. Its not going to hurt anything beyond your own patience.
post #59 of 129
Not too OT...

Take three panels; exact same model of any make: Sammy, Pio, Panny, etc.

Run the same set of break-in slides for 150 hours on all 3.

After this process, will all three panels measure identically? Will there be substantial, minimal or no differences between them?

Just curious.

shane
post #60 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by smjbh5 View Post

Is there something that could be run off a USB stick? Does this have to be running constantly for 100 hours?

Panasonic says that the tv should be broken in? I don't think Samsung says anything like that.

Answer to your first question

YES . you can run off a USB stick.

Answer to your second question

NO. Absolutely not. You don't have to be running constantly for 100 hours. You can take your time breaking the TV in. Lot of people do that fast to test their TV completely before 30 day warranty period. 20 days. 5 hours a day of should do. 100 hours should be enough i think. Again i am not an expert. I just go by Panasonic recommendation for previous plasma TVs



Even i would love to have a TV that i can connect and watch without worrying about baby sitting for 100 hours. But after reading the several suggestions i think there is no harm in doing it. But Panasonic manual says image retention can occur if you have still images for long time. They don't say it will not occur after 123.8 hours. It can happen even after 200 or 300 hours. They have given some screen saver functionality and anti-burn-in functionality. Using them and with little bit of carefulness in the first 100 hours you should be able to do a successful break-in.
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