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Bon Voyage! My first DIY subwoofer...

post #1 of 104
Thread Starter 
Well it took awhile for me to go from an 'idea' to a 'project' but I can officially say I have started it. I have to say thanks to Mayhem for some ideas to get me going. Without this forum it would have been a long uphill battle but getting started in the right direction is definitely a huge advantage. This is going to be a 21" sealed cube (18.5" internally) with a downfiring Shiva-X and an O-audio 500w Bash amp. I've ordered the Shiva last night but have not ordered the amp yet. Anyway here's a few pics of my progress this past week.

It all started with a plan so I quickly jotted down my thoughts. I think it really helps having it all down on paper.


Next it's off to the saw to cut this sheet of MDF down. I started with an inner box made of 3/4" and then on outer box made of 1/2".




Next it's off to the CNC to do the cutout for the inner/outer baffle and the plate amp. It literally took 4 seconds for it to cut the driver cutout on each baffle, alittle more for the plate amp.








Now the plate amp cutout variables get input...I am definitely lucky to have access to all this equipment.




Last but not least, a brace. The CNC left a fraction of a millimetre on these cuts so it didn't actually cut into the pods that hold the material. I simply used a jigsaw to pop them out. Not the best tool but it doesn't matter much for the brace I figured.


So I slapped up four sides and clamped them and took off for the day. It's great doing this on the weekend because the entire shop is empty except for 2 people in other areas.




The next day I added both baffles and clamped it back up.


After realizing the brace was totally wrong because the plate amp sits along one side I cut part of it off and then tapped it down into place.




It turns out that the piece I cut off the brace would fit on top of the brace itself turned upward as to brace the top panel of the sub. I measured the piece and then put the brace the same distance inside the box. Then I drew a line the same distance on the outside so I knew exactly where to pop some finishing nails in to hold the brace nice and tight while it sets.




Now I put the extra piece on top of the brace centered just right. I made sure I tapped the brace down just far enough so it left the extra piece sticking up about a mil or so above the actual height of the walls so the top panel would actually be pushing on it.


Now I glued it and taped it into place so when I tipped the box on it's side it was easy for me to nail it into place.




All done with that so I sealed up the seams.


Next I measured the sections and cut my owens corning insulation into just the right size pieces to fit. Now I use a spray adhesive and insert the insulation.




Before I put the insulation in the other area I added some more bracing along the top 4 edges.






Now I finished up the insulation in the top half.


I added the 1/2" panels to the front/sides and top and then clamped the whole thing up again.


So this is where I stand so far. Tomorrow morning I'll head in to work a bit early and take off the clamps. Next up is filling some pinholes and anything else that needs it and then I'll do the 1/4" roundover. I'll post more pics as they come....
post #2 of 104
Very good opening for a build thread. We like pics.
post #3 of 104
I'm so jealous of you right now it's eff'ing ridiculous

Are there rooms for rent?
post #4 of 104
I'm with Dan !!!
What time is supper served?
Good lord , all that equipment is making me drool.
post #5 of 104
Thread Starter 
I know I'm spoiled!! If a person can just get your parts CNC'd then you eliminate the need for so many tools. No space for rent but I just might consider building more in the future...perhaps 10 at a time based on a popular driver/amp combo. I'm sure there are plenty of people who would pay for an enclosure and just pop the amp/driver in themselves. Anyway I'm looking forward just to getting this one done....

Did I mention we have a huge spray department?? I'm thinking gloss black
post #6 of 104
A spray department too.............
I have to cut my panels with a hatchet and paint with a pine top.
post #7 of 104
You could cut the parts, flat pack them, and the customer could do the rest. I like that idea very much.
post #8 of 104
I do need to get the EB MAX built and tested, and the 24" cube. I need 4 of the EB MAX actually. I think there are others that would be into the EB MAX as a flatpack, or built up and finished.

So Danielson
do you take PayPal???

Have a look at MAX will you
post #9 of 104
Nice work so far Dan! Thanx for the thread and the Pix.
post #10 of 104
So let me get this straight, you have all that equipment at your disposal and you're JUST NOW getting a build going????????


Man, I would have a new build every 3-4 days!!!


Can you do me a favor? Ask the boss man how much the saw and cnc router cost. And the brand/model. I know they're expensive, but I really curious. I have considered buying one. But the ones I saw were smaller and not industrial quality. Hopefully the boss man won't exaggerate their pricing because I really do want to know a close cost.



Oh, I almost forgot, I'm adding a photo to go along with yours:

post #11 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erich H View Post

So let me get this straight, you have all that equipment at your disposal and you're JUST NOW getting a build going????????


Man, I would have a new build every 3-4 days!!!


Can you do me a favor? Ask the boss man how much the saw and cnc router cost. And the brand/model. I know they're expensive, but I really curious. I have considered buying one. But the ones I saw were smaller and not industrial quality. Hopefully the boss man won't exaggerate their pricing because I really do want to know a close cost.

Oh, I almost forgot, I'm adding a photo to go along with yours:

I work 5 days a week, have a wife, kid and 13 pets. I can't work on a project during work hours so it leaves me weekends. So as much as I wish I could build one after another I would not have enough time for the other parts of my life

I'd love to be building them as my job....perhaps one day. As far as pricing on a CNC...we have 3 of them but you can find all that info online if you look around. I can ask what ballpark they are in one of these days....you wouldn't need one too expensive doing simple things involved with sub enclosures. Search for Rover 10 or 20's...
post #12 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielson99 View Post

I work 5 days a week, have a wife, kid and 13 pets. I can't work on a project during work hours so it leaves me weekends. So as much as I wish I could build one after another I would not have enough time for the other parts of my life

I'd love to be building them as my job....perhaps one day. As far as pricing on a CNC...we have 3 of them but you can find all that info online if you look around. I can ask what ballpark they are in one of these days....you wouldn't need one too expensive doing simple things involved with sub enclosures. Search for Rover 10 or 20's...

Uh yeh, I was just kidding about a project every 3 days man! Of course, you could always take your wife and kids to the shop while you run the CNC.


I've looked up the cnc machines, but I'm not sure which brand is better, and they really don't give too many actually prices over the internet. What size boards can you run through the unit you used for this build?
post #13 of 104
Thread Starter 
The CNC can work on a full sheet although I don't think I've ever seen it happen. You could easily fit any panel that's used on even the largest of subwoofers. Doing the cutouts for drivers or plate amps are about the most simple program you could run on a CNC and it cuts through it like butter. 10 inner baffles = less than 2 minutes, same for outer baffles. Plate amp cutouts would be 3 minutes. So you can see how quickly you could make large amounts of supply. Times obviously vary between machines and operators

You can see some pricing on cheaper ones HERE as an example
post #14 of 104
Nice work! Having a CNC machine around sure can save you time during the build.

Ohhh, man. I wouldn't mind having a few of Dan's 24" cubes cut for me on one of those... *hint hint* :P
post #15 of 104
Wow, for some reason I thought new cnc machines could be had for around $20k. No idea they were that much. Crazy.
post #16 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonnash View Post

Wow, for some reason I thought new cnc machines could be had for around $20k. No idea they were that much. Crazy.

For us something like this $4K option would probably do but its only 24"x24"

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...r=cnc%20router

What he posted are the professional options. I have watched ebay for a long time for great value CNC options.

Item 120468011414 on ebay is $3500 plus freight, its 24x48.
post #17 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray View Post

For us something like this $4K option would probably do but its only 24"x24"

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...r=cnc%20router

What he posted are the professional options. I have watched ebay for a long time for great value CNC options.

Item 120468011414 on ebay is $3500 plus freight, its 24x48.

Penngray, I asked the guy at Rockler if you could work on a larger piece of material and he said you could. But you would have to make sure everything was aligned just right when you moved the piece.
post #18 of 104
$3500-4000 is not nearly as bad. Still more than I can pay for a hobby.
post #19 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonnash View Post

$3500-4000 is not nearly as bad. Still more than I can pay for a hobby.

Yeah, I thought the same thing several years ago but now I think back and wonder why I didnt spend the money up front.
post #20 of 104
Oh man you are such a cheater!!!!!! It doesn't count as DIY if all you have to do is glue the box together and install the parts!!!!!!LOL!
post #21 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyng_fool View Post

Oh man you are such a cheater!!!!!! It doesn't count as DIY if all you have to do is glue the box together and install the parts!!!!!!LOL!

We are all Jealous of that workshop!!!

Im going to be posting pics of my CRAP working conditions at some point then everyone here can feel much better about what they have and also everyone can know that if I can build something with my environment, anyone can
post #22 of 104
I do all my cutting and assembly in the carport ! The wife and I lose our covered parking when I have projects going on. At least she doesnt mind
My neighbors appreciate all the mdf dust and the sounds of the router and saws at 10 PM I am sure.
post #23 of 104
I can't even afford the components for a DIY CNC router!
Looks like I'm going to have to go deep DIY, and smelt the ore myself, and forge the steel to make the components, so I can build an affordable DIY CNC router. That is, if I can find a good used steel forge on Craig's List.
post #24 of 104
This thread is officially responsible for causing me to break the 10th Commandment... repeatedly.

Can't wait to see the finished sub!
post #25 of 104
So what's the first machine that actually cut the panel into the proper sizes?
post #26 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erich H View Post

So what's the first machine that actually cut the panel into the proper sizes?

It's a Holzma panel saw. It's nice cutting 2 panels at once but even if you don't each cut is perfect measurement every time. There is no 1/32nd of an inch error on any cuts..it's dead on every time.

The CNC is a Rover A3, we also have a Rover 20 and a Skipper 100. These are all professional quality machines and completely unnecessary for building simple boxes. You could get away with real entry level CNC's for cutting simple driver/amp cutouts etc. It just made things easier for me on my first build...I mean if you had these to use wouldn't you? I really would like to build another subwoofer enclosure just with small tools one day but for now broke down and used the CNC and panel saw

There's a Sandmaster. It will take panels of birch on a conveyer belt and feeds them underneath a sanding belt that's about 4 feet wide. It will take off whatever pre-determined amount of the surface you want and leave you with a completely flat surface. I would have gladly used it for my sub but they don't allow MDF material to run through the sandmaster Guess I'll have to suck it up and use some hand tools to sand it ....
post #27 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rightbrained View Post

I do all my cutting and assembly in the carport ! The wife and I lose our covered parking when I have projects going on. At least she doesnt mind
My neighbors appreciate all the mdf dust and the sounds of the router and saws at 10 PM I am sure.

+1, my driveway is sawdust heaven on weekends and some lunch hours. Im sure some blows into the next door patio/pool He hasnt complained yet but Im expecting it some time.

Our bikes, strollers etc get dust all over them I have been meaning to build a temp area with heavy duty plastic curtain but I guess I have been too lazy to do it!
post #28 of 104
ouch , that pool filter is loving you penn.
I am in the process of rectifying my situation by selling my house and moving to the country and building a dedicated workshop .
post #29 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielson99 View Post

It's a Holzma panel saw. It's nice cutting 2 panels at once but even if you don't each cut is perfect measurement every time. There is no 1/32nd of an inch error on any cuts..it's dead on every time.

The CNC is a Rover A3, we also have a Rover 20 and a Skipper 100. These are all professional quality machines and completely unnecessary for building simple boxes. You could get away with real entry level CNC's for cutting simple driver/amp cutouts etc. It just made things easier for me on my first build...I mean if you had these to use wouldn't you? I really would like to build another subwoofer enclosure just with small tools one day but for now broke down and used the CNC and panel saw

There's a Sandmaster. It will take panels of birch on a conveyer belt and feeds them underneath a sanding belt that's about 4 feet wide. It will take off whatever pre-determined amount of the surface you want and leave you with a completely flat surface. I would have gladly used it for my sub but they don't allow MDF material to run through the sandmaster Guess I'll have to suck it up and use some hand tools to sand it ....

Thanks for all that information, I appreciate it.

Yeh, I realize it's overkill for just a DIY deal. But I've been thinking about other things to use them for as well. I have some space in a warehouse that needs to be used. I knew they were expensive machines, especially the CNC router. But I wasn't expecting the panel saw to be that expensive. But I have seen other panel saws that aren't linked to a computer that could get a person started.


Tools like that seem expensive, but not when you figure they're industrial tools and people use them to earn a living. Heck, a skid steer is $26k+, or a small dumptruck can be $50k. So I'm not surprised at the pricing.

But I'd be worried buying used ones pushing 15 years old. New units that size wouldn't make much sense. I'm going to keep looking at the smaller machines though. I don't know what a middle grade CNC would go for, but I will keep looking.
post #30 of 104
this one does full 4x8 with 4" of z travel for $5k.

http://www.digirout.com/DR1000.html
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