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Bon Voyage! My first DIY subwoofer... - Page 3

post #61 of 104
Thread Starter 
So today I got busy!!! Here's a few pics to update my progress.

It worked perfect to just stick a piece of 2x4 inside the driver cutout and hang it up with some bungee cords. I used 2 at first but got kinda worried so added another. Hanging it up saves alot of time because you can hit all sides at once quite easily.

This pic is the first 2 coats. It's a Sherwin Williams Black Vinyl sealer. I'm not an expert with paints but doing this at work also brings with it some good advice from the Paint Dept. people The second coat goes on 3-4 minutes after the first.


Here's the finished product after 2 coats of the sealer.


The sealer really brings out any imperfections so after 1 hour of drying time we hit those imperfections/pinholes etc with putty and then light sanded it with 320g sandpaper. Here's a couple pics of what it looks like during and after putty/sanding. I'd also like to say thanks to the fine people who helped me with this. It's a bit hard taking a pic and sanding/painting or anything at the same time and the advice was also very educational and helpful.




Here's the enclosure after 4 coats of the Sher-Will Vinyl sealer. It's drying as we speak and I'll let it set overnight and be back in the morning to give it a sanding before it gets hit with a High Gloss Sher-Will Conversion Varnish. This has a sheen of 90 when it's done (hopefully) for those who know what that actually is... It's basically going to look WET if all goes well. I'll maybe even break out the Gloss meter and see what it officially says the sheen is. I wouldn't doubt if sheen rating varies between manufacturer or even industry so the bottom line is really the finished product.


I'm really looking forward to tomorrow!!! I might give it 1 or possibly 2 coats of the varnish and steel wool sand it between coats...
post #62 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by LHD21 View Post

I was setup to get the Dewalt and I read a lot of reviews about the rails being smaller which lead to head deflection. The hitachi had nothing but praise.

The specs I see for the hitachi are 45° Miter (L/R) 4-3/16"x8-5/8" or 4-11/16"x7-1/13" .

I completely agree the Hitachi is a much better tool.. Well except for the fact it will not do what you need, but for stuff within the specs it is. I think must have glanced at the 45 bevel not miter.. yeah it looses a lot of capacity.

Looks like you need to get a 14" RAS and build the Hitachi on the same plane as the RAS table and have a nice big station haha..
post #63 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEO Dan View Post

Dan/Daniel?,
Thanks for having a look I've drawn the sheets for ease of illustration but in this situation and in my own builds I generally try and make sure that all the edges are machine cuts, can you consider adjusting your layout to accommodate this. Eliminating the factory edges insures the glue joints are nice and tight with very small glue lines. There are other significantly easier to assemble designs in "inventory" if you want to offer a line of flatpacks. Offering a flatpack of a Shiva/Tempest/Maelstrom-X + dual PR design could sell in voulme if you have the ability to package for drop shipment via FedEx/UPS.


Mayhem,
I'm 100% with you on this. I'm sure this would increase sales of the higher performance "boutique" drivers. I think there are lots of folks out there that simply don't buy the drivers for lack of tools or skill they think they can't build a worthy enclosure. This would potentially open the door to very high performance for those with the patience to assemble the enclosure.

We never cut anything using a factory edge. All factory edges are always removed. The saw automatically trims it off at whatever size you choose....right town to 1mm if you feel like it

The MAXPacks as I'm now calling them are tentatively a go. This isn't going to be 'my' project and it will be run through the shop with me being a customer. Of course I'll get a better deal but we'll wait to see the quotes before getting too excited. I also need to know if there are any roundovers needed and any other special tidbits (hopefully these are minimal as it may increase cost). I don't see a need for doing more than 12 of them but if you can find more people interested then let me know. Once again...this is not a final decision and it's obviously pending a quote (on monday most likely) and then factoring in shipping etc. It won't be cheap but I'm sure you know that already...I'll try and get this done for the best price I can. I don't plan or expect to make anything except friends from this .
post #64 of 104
Daniel,
if you had the capability to do the roundovers that would be awesome, but that would require some serious fixturing.

Here are some pics from earlier generation builds the roundover to be used is 1.25"
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...6/CIMG0003.jpg
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...6/CIMG0024.jpg
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...6/CIMG0053.jpg
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...S/DSCN2827.jpg

IMO this would be difficult prior to glue up, and even if you could do it the parts would be fragile and assembly would be a PITA. Mabey you should offer a finished version That finish job you got going there looks good so far.

I do consider the roundovers in the port a basic requirement, builders will have to track down a 1/2" Colet router, and buy a bit(now on sale at Rockler or MLCS) and preferably a plexi baseplate for the router (also cheap at Rockler or MLCS) unless having a HUGE hole in the stock baseplate is not an issue.
post #65 of 104
I would forgo the steel wool, you don't want any errant particles to get into the magnetic gap on the subwoofer, that would be not good.
post #66 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by michael hurd View Post

I would forgo the steel wool, you don't want any errant particles to get into the magnetic gap on the subwoofer, that would be not good.

This is steel wool specially made for sanding. I'll make sure not to sand the bottom where the driver cutout is but the other sides should be fine. You need to sand between coats and nothing is as scratch free as steel wool that I know of. It will be completely cleaned before the last coat goes on. Thanks for the tip though...I'll leave the bottom side alone.
post #67 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEO Dan View Post

Daniel,
if you had the capability to do the roundovers that would be awesome, but that would require some serious fixturing.

IMO this would be difficult prior to glue up, and even if you could do it the parts would be fragile and assembly would be a PITA.

I wasn't meaning anything external, that would be difficult to assemble. Having no machining to do other than on the saw and the few CNC cutouts will be much easier to handle.
post #68 of 104
Thread Starter 
So after hardly sleeping last night I woke up waaaay too early and spent the morning pacing back and forth....knowing I had to wait until 10:30am before the shop opens for the weekend shift

I left early and went looking for some feet to put on the sub for something to do. BTW if anyone has any good idea's for feet please feel free to suggest something.

After what seemed like an eternity I showed up at work ready to put some Sher-Will Conversion Varnish on this baby. First things first however it needed to be sanded from yesterday's coats of Black Vinyl sealer. Here's a pic of the super-fine steel wool and sanding pad (roughly 320g) used to 'cross sand' over any bumps and give a generally light sanding before the Varnish is applied.


Here's what it looked like after it was sanded and cleaned.


Here's the first coat of Varnish being applied.


Here's the enclosure after 3 light coats. This Varnish is quite thin and can't be applied very thick at one time. You can basically put 3 coats on in a very short time with what ends up being one very thick coat.


I'll leave it now until tomorrow morning and reassess it. From what I've been told if you put too much on it's more prone to cracking because Varnish gets extremely hard. If all looks well and there's no dry spots or problem area's I may just be hauling it home tomorrow morning.
post #69 of 104
the last pic looks like an orange, but surely you will fix that.
post #70 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTD02 View Post

the last pic looks like an orange, but surely you will fix that.

This pic was taken seconds after painting. You'll see some orange on the bottom panel but the air comes out as it dries. All 5 other sides were free from this so if all 'dries' well I'll be happy...even if there is a slight peel on the bottom I really don't care. I won't sand and recoat the entire box just for a side that nobody will ever see. Of course if I was doing this professionally for a customer there would be no flaws of this nature but this is my first build...and I'm not even a painter I am willing to accept some flaws..it's all a great learning process for me. I have already kept a mental list of things I will do differently in my next build which will definitely lead to a better finished product. But that's not to say I'm not very happy with this build so far...it's been an exciting experience to say the least.

Bottom line...if it doesn't look good enough I'll sand and put another coat on. Peel is easy to fix...just takes some sandpaper/steel wool and some more Varnish Whether or not it's worth my time to fix a small issue on the bottom of my sub is another story..we'll see in the morning.
post #71 of 104
Thread Starter 
So after your post I was curious to see how drying had affected that 'peel' look on the bottom side. I went back to work to see it and just got home. I would say that the majority of that problem is gone but some still does exist. It's not orange peel at all though, there are some tiny pinholes. You can really only see them close up. If you stand back a few feet you don't see them at all. I'm not sure yet what I'll do...it looks really good as it is and perhaps if there's a wax I can put on it those tiny pinholes would be all but gone. Any ideas? Also does anyone have any links to some feet for this unit? Black or Silver is what I'm thinking...anything can be painted though. Just thought someone might know who stocks a good variety of options...
post #72 of 104
I have only sprayed a bit of conversion varnish, but the experience I had with it, it appears to have slight peel after spraying, no matter how wet you put it on. It does die back a bit in gloss and flatten out at the same time.

I did polish up the boxes I did for a friend with that M.L. Campbell Krystal conversion varnish. They turned out very decent.



This is what it looked like literally 3-4 minutes after spraying.... peel looking, it flattened out quite a bit.





After polishing
LL
LL
LL
post #73 of 104
Thread Starter 
What product did you use to polish it? Meguiars?

I did have that same bit of 'peel' effect after the varnish went on but it does flatten out quite a bit. Your job looks very good and I'm pretty certain with a good polish my enclosure will pop like that. I'd like to know what product would be good to use before just trying anything.
post #74 of 104
3M Perfect-it III Extra Cut compound, then 3M Perfect-it Machine glaze.
post #75 of 104
Thread Starter 
So first thing this morning I headed out to the stores to find some product to eliminate the orange peel on my enclosure. I went to a local store and luckily they had a Random Orbit Polisher for half price at $25. I grabbed an extra polishing pad to go with it although it came with a couple different ones. I then saw the Turtle Wax rubbing and polishing compounds so threw those into the cart. To finish it off I went with the Meguiars Machine Glaze. Last but not least some p800 and p1500 wet/dry sandpaper. The sandpaper was sold by the sheet too so it saved me money. All the supplies cost $50-$60.


When I got to work I took a good look at the box and went HMMMM
I then started wet sanding the bottom since I thought it would be the safest surface to test this procedure on. 45 minutes later I'm still working on the bottom and finding it a slow process for sure. Then I thought about all the football games that had just started...and I took a more sincere look at the enclosure once again.


I really had to reassess the whole thing. Sure there is some peel effect but the finished product is very glossy and uniform. I did not put 3 'THICK' coats on so I knew I didn't have as much Varnish on there as I really needed to be taking it down deep enough to remove all the peel. I also knew that I wanted this thing out of my workspace because I don't want it sitting around there for another week.
Bottom line was that I took the sub home and put it outside where the daylight really brings out the imperfections...and it really didn't look too bad to me. All things considered I think I will just stick with this the way it is.


It's solid and the paint job is pretty good considering it's my first. Now...the real surprise is that I actually built a second enclosure while I did this build thread. It's identical to the first one but has not gone past the gluing together stage. It's just a raw box ready to be rounded over or whatever I decide. Perhaps a veneer....

I did learn alot though. You're far better off making sure each step is done to perfection. Going back and having to fix problems is so much more time consuming than taking the time to get it right first. I should have spent more time prepping the box before paint and I should have taken time learning to paint ....even on scrap pieces.

I'm still happy with it..very happy. Both the amp and driver are being delivered so I'll put this thing together soon I hope.
post #76 of 104
I use these from Ikea for $10 for four of em.

post #77 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielson99 View Post

It's solid and the paint job is pretty good considering it's my first.

I'd say it looks fantastic - I know I couldn't get something together that looked this nice. I think I'm in love with your shop too
post #78 of 104
Thread Starter 
Well, I threw it in the corner where my PA-120 was. I'll leave it there until the amp and driver arrive.


post #79 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 View Post

I use these from Ikea for $10 for four of em.


I'll look for something like that. I need the bolt to be over 1.5" long to get through the two baffles.
post #80 of 104
The bolt included is simple threaded rod-make em as long as you like.
post #81 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielson99 View Post

Well, I threw it in the corner where my PA-120 was. I'll leave it there until the amp and driver arrive.



Well done, looks fantastic!
post #82 of 104
Are you shooting with a Binks AA1500 or a Kremlin??


Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielson99 View Post


Here's the first coat of Varnish being applied.
post #83 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBDiver View Post

Are you shooting with a Binks AA1500 or a Kremlin??

Sorry that's one of the few things I didn't write down. I don't work in the spray department so I'm not up to speed on these things. I should have had this info already *slaps forehead*.

The good news is that I will have the Shiva driver tomorrow and the O-audio amp most likely by this weekend! Looking forward to it!!
post #84 of 104
Thread Starter 
Anybody know what hurricane nuts I'll need? Also what's a good idea to use for getting a really good tight seal around the amp/driver?
post #85 of 104
I would assume 1/4" bolts for the driver, you should be able to pick up T-nuts at a hardware store / Home Depot. Check in their weatherstripping area for thin ( 3/32 - 1/8th" thick ) weatherstripping, around 3/4" wide. Apply that to your driver cutout after drilling the holes for the bolts and pressing in the T-nuts.

I used a small piece of wood and a large C-clamp to press them in. Poke holes in the weatherstrip where you need to. ( bolt holes )

Check with Exodus about the bolt size before purchasing T-nuts and bolts. Most of the standard open tool frames will accept 1/4", but I am not 100% sure that that driver will.
post #86 of 104
you have done a really nice job with that box and it has been an enjoyable read.

i'd be interested to hear from a finishing pro how much work would be required (using an expert process) to take that box from where it is to a mirror gloss.
post #87 of 104
Thread Starter 
Luckily I received both the amp and driver today!! WOOHOOO!!!!

The amp arrived double-boxed.


It came with the 2 spade connectors and power cord.


The Shiva-X came packaged in some nice thick foam protection as seen.






I know I know, it's not a Maelstrom...but here's a size reference anyway.


post #88 of 104
i like your measurement reference. ;-)
post #89 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTD02 View Post

i like your measurement reference. ;-)

I was opening it right away anyway so it works. I would be drilling the mounting holes right now if it wouldn't ensure I'd be sleeping on the couch for the next week....so I'll have a beer and formulate my plan of attack for the morning.
So far I'll need 8 - 1/4" bolts and hurricane nuts for the driver and 10 smaller ones for the amp. I picked up some weather stripping already for the driver. I'll be getting this thing together in the morning....damn stores won't be open early enough

Thanks for any compliments about the build. I have basically just winged it...but it's been nice having the equipment I have access to. I'm very happy with it so far and look forward to capping this project very very soon!!

I'm glad to be showing as much as I can about this build in picture form...perhaps it will benefit someone down the road. I wouldn't be where I am without the help of others in this forum too....so thanks to all those who offered advice.
post #90 of 104
Thread Starter 
Well I couldn't go to bed yet...so I dry-fit the driver to see how it fit.
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