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Panasonic PT-AE4000 MSRP $1999 - Page 276

post #8251 of 8492
Might want to get some hours on the bulb before you do a full cal.
post #8252 of 8492
^I'd agree. Do a quickie calibration just to make it nice, but don't knock your socks off or spend much time on it. Wait until the bulb has had some time to "burn in" over the next few weeks. [I can't believe I just wrote that considering how many in these forums ridiculously apply this "burn in" nonsense to things like SS amplifiers and, gulp, disc players where it doesn't apply, yet millions think it does! DOH!

Also calibrations shouldn't be done unless the pj has been warmed up for say 20 minutes or so.
post #8253 of 8492
I totally understand about waiting to do calibrations until the new bulb has had a "breaking in" period... but for those who have done bulb changes... does a bulb change radically alter the projector calibrations, or will I find that my existing settings (that I've been very happy with for the entire life of the old bulb) will be just about "right on" with only a few tweaks? Just want to know what I'm in for. Thanks for the replies!
post #8254 of 8492
Brand new bulbs (genuine Panasonic, that is) are always much brighter, but then dim quickly after around 100 hrs (or so) of use. They then have a gently declining plateau from there, so if doing full calibrations is a hassle and you want to do only one, wait 'til 100 hours (or so) of use.

If you don't mind re-calibrating repeatedly, calibrate per use! eek.gif [joke]
post #8255 of 8492
To some degree there must be a small variation from bulb to bulb, even if both are brand new. I doubt it is very significant in the big picture though, so I wouldn't worry about it. I suspect when you put in your new bulb it will be quite acceptable (using your older calibration, that is) however if you have colorimetry instruments they might discover that your adjustments are slightly off by a notch or two. Again, not a big deal.

If you don't own any calibration tools and would have to pay for an ISF or similar technician to come visit, I'd personally think it's not worth it.

Keep in mind there are probably bigger differences in your source material itself, movie to movie or TV network to TV network, such that this small difference between bulbs would be swamped by variations within your source material.
---

Coincidentally we are a day away from a great source material to demonstrate this. When Obama or Romney gives their acceptance or concession speech (assuming this election isn't another "drag out for weeks" one) flip around from network to network and watch how the color values vary by network channel [ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, etc], yet all originate from the same camera feed. This was especially true back in the olden days of NTSC [never twice the same color wink.gif]
Edited by m. zillch - 11/5/12 at 5:43pm
post #8256 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

To some degree there must be a small variation from bulb to bulb, even if both are brand new. I doubt it is very significant in the big picture though, so I wouldn't worry about it. I suspect when you put in your new bulb it will be quite acceptable (using your older calibration, that is) however if you have colorimetry instruments they might discover that your adjustments are slightly off by a notch or two. Again, not a big deal.
If you don't own any calibration tools and would have to pay for an ISF or similar technician to come visit, I'd personally think it's not worth it.
Keep in mind there are probably bigger differences in your source material itself, movie to movie or TV network to TV network, such that this small difference between bulbs would be swamped by variations within your source material.

Thanks so much for your thoughtful and in-depth reply. Much appreciated!
post #8257 of 8492
I just picked up a Panny 4k think weekend and mated it to the Panny BDT500 BluRay player. With the BD having so many picture options, which ones should I use? Do I just feed the PJ an untweaked signal or do I utilize them and the PJ settings?
post #8258 of 8492
Ideally you should get a calibration disc and send an untweaked signal to the 4000. The 4000 has finer adjustments than most other external sources and a waveform monitor to tweak brightness and contrast using instrumentation, assuming your source can send a gray scale ramp pattern, such as is found on many BD calibration discs.
post #8259 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

Ideally you should get a calibration disc and send an untweaked signal to the 4000. The 4000 has finer adjustments than most other external sources and a waveform monitor to tweak brightness and contrast using instrumentation, assuming your source can send a gray scale ramp pattern, such as is found on many BD calibration discs.

Which one do you recommend? Thanks.
post #8260 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by GIXX1300 View Post

I just picked up a Panny 4k think weekend and mated it to the Panny BDT500 BluRay player. With the BD having so many picture options, which ones should I use? Do I just feed the PJ an untweaked signal or do I utilize them and the PJ settings?

Care to share how much you were able to find it for?
post #8261 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by madspeed View Post

Care to share how much you were able to find it for?

Bought it from a member on this site in the Classifieds..
post #8262 of 8492
The big names in video calibration are Avia by Ovation software, HD HQV Benchmark by Sicicon Optix, Spears and Munsil HD Benchmark, and Digital Video Essentials [but there are others too]. Sorry, I don't recall off the top of my head which of these offer grayscale ramps (you can use either stepped or continuous), you'll have to research that on your own. Also, these companies offer more than one disc, yet they all have similar names, so it can be confusing. Be sure you are getting a BD and not just a DVD which would only allow you to calibrate at 480i/p only, not 720p or 1080i/p (HD that is, which is what you want to do).
post #8263 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by GIXX1300 View Post

Which one do you recommend? Thanks.

The AVS-HD Bluray calibration disc has a greyscale ramp on it. It is also the easiest one to use with RGB filters for color calibration because it uses flashing bars. The test screens are far easier to navigate on this disc than on DVE. And it's free, but you will need a Bluray burner to create the disc.

This thread describes it in detail, including how to download:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/948496/avs-hd-709-blu-ray-mp4-calibration
post #8264 of 8492
Good point. I can't believe I forgot that one and it's right here! DOH!

Also, you don't need a Bluray burner to make it. Using the AVCHD version you can use a common DVD burner and make an HD disc that will play back in the vast majority of modern bluray machines, in full HD.

The only problem is you don't get a blue color filter for some of the other adjustments, which typically comes with the commercial discs. THX used to sell the blue filter a la carte, but all the links to their purchase site I've come across seem down at the moment.frown.gif
Edited by m. zillch - 11/12/12 at 7:14pm
post #8265 of 8492
Does anyone know the outlet temperature expected range for this projector?

I recently mounted mine in a hush box and want to make sure temps are under control with the power ventilation.

Thanks
Nicholas
post #8266 of 8492
I would think what matters is the internal temperature, not the exhaust. Access the service menu and it shows the status of several internal thermal sensors.
post #8267 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

I would think what matters is the internal temperature, not the exhaust. Access the service menu and it shows the status of several internal thermal sensors.


Thanks good point, Anyone know what those should be reading?
post #8268 of 8492
You needed a hush box for the AE4000? Mine's directly overhead and I can't here it even when things are muted.

If you haven't tried it outside of the hust box, might be worth giving it a chance. You'll also want to ensure you are in Normal mode (rather than High Altitude), unless you are actually at high altitude.

Mike
post #8269 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sargent View Post

You needed a hush box for the AE4000? Mine's directly overhead and I can't here it even when things are muted.

If you haven't tried it outside of the hust box, might be worth giving it a chance. You'll also want to ensure you are in Normal mode (rather than High Altitude), unless you are actually at high altitude.

Mike

Hi Mike,

My hush box decision was two fold. I have heat issues in my theater room and the projector contributes many btu/hr to the room, so the hush box addressed two "issues" with one treatment. Yes, I had it mounted above my head for a long time and its hard to hear except on quiet passages. However, noise floor is additive and I have other amps and components with fans. I opted to seal up my equipment rack and projector in seperate systems with their own respective ventilation systems to address both the noise floor and heat issues.

I did measure the outlet temp before moving the projector but didn't measure for long. I assumed the projector would be "up to temperature" after only a short bit and now after careful study I see the projector outlet temp rising for a longer period than initially thought. Since its in the box I really don't have a baseline now and don't know exact temperatures one would see "open air."

Can someone please check their temps in the service menu "open air" so I will have something to compare?

Thanks,
Nicholas
post #8270 of 8492
OK, you owe me one.smile.gif

My room is 79 degrees F (measured just under the pj). First I checked the mode I was in, which is not what most people use: High Altitude ON [prolongs bulb life] Lamp power ECO-Mode [improves blacks]. Some of the values flicker between two values, but I'm only reporting one of them:

Freshly turned on, about 30 seconds from hitting "Power On:

INTK: 164
EXST: 151
FLTR: 163

20 minutes later, I assume at a state of thermal equalibrium:

INTK: 163
EXST: 102
FLTR: 165

I then took a break at let the pj cool down (off) for half an hour or so.

I then tested the more common use setup, High Altitude OFF and Lamp Power Normal. Again, some values flickered. From freshly powered on:

INTK: 166
EXST: 158
FLTR: 168

20 minutes later, I assume at a state of thermal equalibrium:

INTK: 163
EXST: 109
FLTR: 169

NOTE: These values aren't Farenheight or Celcius, I don't know what they are, but it seems they have a numerical value of "0-255" (2 to the power of 8) and lower numbers are HOTTER values. I would assume "163-166" is close to my 79 degrees F room temperature.

Interestingly there seems to be little variation based on the changed modes, in fact "High Altitude/ECO-mode" seems hotter at the exhaust port after 20 min.

Let us know if you find a way to translate these figures to what we commonly use (temperature scales, that is).
Edited by m. zillch - 11/13/12 at 6:01pm
post #8271 of 8492
^Thanks!

I moved the projector last night so spent my time realigning projector. I'll check my numbers against yours and see how they line up.

I'll also change my projector into "high altitude" mode since I can't hear it now anyways.
post #8272 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

The big names in video calibration are Avia by Ovation software, HD HQV Benchmark by Sicicon Optix, Spears and Munsil HD Benchmark, and Digital Video Essentials [but there are others too]. Sorry, I don't recall off the top of my head which of these offer grayscale ramps (you can use either stepped or continuous), you'll have to research that on your own. Also, these companies offer more than one disc, yet they all have similar names, so it can be confusing. Be sure you are getting a BD and not just a DVD which would only allow you to calibrate at 480i/p only, not 720p or 1080i/p (HD that is, which is what you want to do).

Thanks,I have the DVD versions of both so now I will look for the BluRay updated versions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sargent View Post

You'll also want to ensure you are in Normal mode (rather than High Altitude), unless you are actually at high altitude.
Mike

I actually had that issue somehow.When I first setup,for some reason it was in HA Mode and I really thought the thing was broke..Holy Cow than fan is loud!!
post #8273 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicksHitachi View Post

^Thanks!
I moved the projector last night so spent my time realigning projector. I'll check my numbers against yours and see how they line up.
I'll also change my projector into "high altitude" mode since I can't hear it now anyways.

The German site Cine4home has a review on the temperature output of the 4000. Scroll down to where you see the 'thermo' pictures.

http://www.cine4home.com/tests/3-tests/28-panasonic-pt-ae4000-lcd-projector-.html
post #8274 of 8492
Mr. G,

Thanks, It looks like I'm within a few degrees of that spec so I'm thinking the ventilation is adequate.

I'm going to try to check the heat numbers against those zillch got for one extra level of assurance.


Thanks,
Nicholas.
post #8275 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

OK, you owe me one.smile.gif

My room is 79 degrees F (measured just under the pj). First I checked the mode I was in, which is not what most people use: High Altitude ON [prolongs bulb life] Lamp power ECO-Mode [improves blacks]. Some of the values flicker between two values, but I'm only reporting one of them:

Freshly turned on, about 30 seconds from hitting "Power On:

INTK: 164
EXST: 151
FLTR: 163

20 minutes later, I assume at a state of thermal equalibrium:

INTK: 163
EXST: 102
FLTR: 165

I then took a break at let the pj cool down (off) for half an hour or so.

I then tested the more common use setup, High Altitude OFF and Lamp Power Normal. Again, some values flickered. From freshly powered on:

INTK: 166
EXST: 158
FLTR: 168

20 minutes later, I assume at a state of thermal equalibrium:

INTK: 163
EXST: 109
FLTR: 169

NOTE: These values aren't Farenheight or Celcius, I don't know what they are, but it seems they have a numerical value of "0-255" (2 to the power of 8) and lower numbers are HOTTER values. I would assume "163-166" is close to my 79 degrees F room temperature.

Interestingly there seems to be little variation based on the changed modes, in fact "High Altitude/ECO-mode" seems hotter at the exhaust port after 20 min.

Let us know if you find a way to translate these figures to what we commonly use (temperature scales, that is).

Hmm I finally checked my numbers and they don't match with yours at all......

Just powered on temperatures:

INTK: 24
EXST: 30
FLTR: 130

After running 2hrs

INTK: 25
EXHST: 52
FLTR: 137

Does anyone else have numbers on heat sensors?

Here's how to check if you don't know:

  1. Hit power toggle
  2. Press Right on Directional pad to highlight "cancel"
  3. Press Up, Down, Up, Down, Enter
post #8276 of 8492
The 4000 must generate some degree of heat even when off. [Some circuitry must remain energized so the IR incoming signal will activate it, for example].

Yours does seem hot. Have you tried inserting a normal thermometer inside your hush box to see what sort of real world temperatures occur, both while the 4000 is idle as well as on?
post #8277 of 8492
The ventilation fan is thermostatically controlled and the box internal temp never gets above ambient!!!!???
post #8278 of 8492
Hey everyone

Last Feb 2012 I had my Panny AE 4000 up for sale here for $1500 at the time. It only has a few hundred hrs on it but it never sold.

I never got to use it as much as I would like because it was in Living room and didn't want to watch everyday TV on it and use up Lamp Life.

I watched 85% TV and maybe %15 Projector and only had a 40" TV for everyday viewing and wanted a Mits 73" so that's why I was selling it. It never
sold but I did buy my Mits 73' with my tax return. smile.gif

I was going to move this past Summer but that never happened so I'm thinking about pulling out the
AE4000 and hooking it up again being I will be stuck here for another year or more frown.gif

I figure I better get some use out of it before it becomes a relic and 4K is dirt cheap.


Anyway the panny has been packed up in it's original box for almost a year now. It's been in a pretty decent size closet
in my place and has never been moved for almost an entire year.

I will clean the filter of course like I always did at 100 hrs but I'm wondering if maybe I should clean the panels
or pull out the lamp and clean around in there.

Should I take any special steps before powering this baby up ?


Edit: Ooops..It's just been brought to my attention that it was Feb of 2011 not 2012 so it's been packed away for almost 2 years..yikes !
Edited by Blue Rain - 12/16/12 at 2:03pm
post #8279 of 8492
USE IT! NOW! Don't shy from lamp life either. The cost per hour gets very expensive if you only use a few hundred hours a year. Use the snot out of it and buy a replacement bulb and use the snot out of that too! Your cost per hour will go way down and you'll be doing what you got it for, right? smile.gif
post #8280 of 8492
I don't quite get how the cost per hour is less if you use the projector a lot, the cost per hour should always be the same, it's the cost per day/week/month that would vary. My 4k is 3 years old and only has 1700 hours on it. I run a projector almost daily, just not the 4k. I had a Panny 2k when I bought the 4k, and I decided that rather than sell it for 1/4th of what I paid for it I'd keep it and use it for TV sports & DVD and save the 4k for blu-ray only. That worked out well but when I upgraded to a 110" screen from a 96" screen the difference in 720p & 1080p was too noticeable, so last year I bought an Epson 8100 1080p pj on closeout for $650 and sold the Panny2k. It's perfect for TV & DVD and even some BDs and the 4k gets only casual use. I probably won't have to replace the lamp until well in to year 4.

And Blue Rain, you don't have to do anything special, the power up sequence is the same for the projector whether it was last used yesterday or 2 years ago. Enjoy it!
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