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Panasonic PT-AE4000 MSRP $1999 - Page 279

post #8341 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sargent View Post

My PT-AE4000 got zapped by lightning. Not a direct hit on the A/C side, but probably an induced voltage on the HDMI line that killed the HDMI inputs.

Michael - too bad about that damage. Why not a repair? Sounds like the damage was mainly to the HDMI board. Or are you ready to move on to something newer?
post #8342 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post

Why not a repair?
Everyone I spoke to does not recommend repairing after lightning because you can't tell what else will fail after a little while. So insurance is covering most of my loss, but I would like to get something to help cover the difference.

Mike
post #8343 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sargent View Post

Everyone I spoke to does not recommend repairing after lightning because you can't tell what else will fail after a little while. So insurance is covering most of my loss, but I would like to get something to help cover the difference.

Mike

Mine got hit by lightning last year and killed the board. Panasonic repaired it and it has been working fine for a year now.



Alex
post #8344 of 8492
I've found a used PT-AE4000 for $750 + shipping. Bulb has 1500 hours on it. This would be my first projector.

Since projector technology advances so quickly, does it still make sense to buy this older model? It sounds like it was a champion when it came out and that's a very low price.
post #8345 of 8492

There are lots of things I wouldn't hesitate to buy used, but a pj isn't one of them, unless it is from a well established, professional dealer with a no questions asked money back guarantee. My concerns would be the following:

 

- Unlike a modern day car, the "odometer" [which records the  number of hours on the current bulb] can be "fudged". [I wont discuss how, but trust me] You are taking the seller's word for it basically when it comes to that spec.

 

- Aftermarket bulbs (lamps) with inferior color temperatures, lamp life, brightness uniformity, etc. may have been used instead of true Panasonic lamps only. Buying real deal bulbs is a tricky endeavor even for seasoned veterans, like us in this thread, so it would be quite reasonable to assume that a third party who insists "Oh yeah, I only used the correct bulbs" to be mistaken, since the market is flush with clone/counterfeit versions which are marketed as "real deal" and easily could have fooled them.

 

- besides bulbs there are other things, like partially burnt polarizers and "dust blobs", which might not be readily apparent to a first time buyer doing a casual inspection, not knowing what to check out.

 

I'm not new to this, BTW; I've owned four different Panasonic pjs for over a decade, sold other brands as a professional dealer before that, and stay up on forum chit-chat and industry trends.


Edited by m. zillch - 9/1/13 at 7:27am
post #8346 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by ledhed2222 View Post


Since projector technology advances so quickly, does it still make sense to buy this older model? It sounds like it was a champion when it came out and that's a very low price.

I think if you really look close, technology does not advance as much as you think, the manufactures just build cheaper units with more options and gimmicks to fudge specs and just look like advances. I would stay clear of used LCD as the issues of dust, polarizers and panel failures unless you could seriously trust the seller. 1500 hours on lamp .. ok that could be true or false.. but how many total hours on the unit.. 1500 or 6500.. Some units have a total time counter that can not be altered .. I guess reloading firmware would reset it.. but in general you can not just push a button and set it to zero, so that is something to look into in the case of the unit you are looking at. You can not assume everything works, I would list out all the power and manual options and request verification that each one works as new and if they do not work when you receive it, you have the options of a full refund including shipping. It is a crap shoot and getting a unit services that has a failure is going to cost more than new so buyer beware!
post #8347 of 8492
Simply put, if you want 2D only then you might be blown-away by this "older model", but ONLY if it has no serious problems as mentioned. But defects could be either very COSTLY or perhaps even IMPOSSIBLE to fix.

I have a 5+ year-old LCD PJ that is less competent than the 4000, but it looks as good as the day I bought it, and only when it dies (or develops a serious problem) will I spring for a new model, one which will be 3D-capable.
post #8348 of 8492
So the verdict is really to buy a lesser new projector rather than used? That's not what I expected, to be honest. I do see the points you guys are making, and I wouldn't have thought of them. Is there a good way to still buy used but avoid these pitfalls? Any communities or sites that you think are reputable enough to trust?
post #8349 of 8492
You might look for a refurb on Amazon or Ebay or some other trusted retailer.
post #8350 of 8492
I was one of the lucky ones that bought a new one in January 2012. The next month, I couldn't find any new ones anywhere. Unless it was a friend or family I wouldn't even consider a used one. Even then, they better just "give it" to me tongue.gif
post #8351 of 8492
I would pass if you can't try it at your place for a few hours at least.
post #8352 of 8492
You can add a square trade warranty if you buy it from Ebay even if it is used (and probably from Amazon as well), that's the key.
Just look at the square trade reviews on reseller ratings and you'll see that unlike many of the warranty companies in the past, this company actually doesn't mess around, if it breaks, they will replace it.

http://pages.ebay.com/warranty/squaretrade.html

For any sizeable used purchase, the square trade warranty can save you.
post #8353 of 8492
good idea,I think the Epson is brighter so maybe in a room with light it is the better choice too kUuE
post #8354 of 8492
There is a Panny 4000 forsale in the classifieds here & Im going to sell my 4000 with a chief mount with 165 hrs on it,if anyone is interested pm me.Ive sold two projectors here before but forgot the members names.
post #8355 of 8492

If you buy a used pj for, say, $850, the extended warranty companies will, at best, give you a $850 credit towards a new pj, perhaps of their selection. It is not like they will give you a brand new, $2000 current Panasonic pj. Also, unless they clearly state, "And unlike anyone else, we cover problems from abuse and neglect!" then assume that they DON'T. Things like dust blobs and partially burnt polarizers, two biggies, are often deemed "neglect" issues (poor ventilation, didn't clean the air filter every 100 hrs., etc.). [And of course they never cover the bulb (lamp) unless they have plans that cost a lot more than most.]

 

If the extended warranty company goes bankrupt, do you get your money back?

 

Ask yourself this: Do they set their prices arbitrarily? Or do they use clever statisticians who carefully calculate the actual likelihood of product failure, over the given time, and the price to fix/replace it , to then determine a price that will be, overall , more profitable to them, the insurers, or to us, the buyers? Think about it.

 

"we think extended warranties for computers and other electronics items are bad investments. In past surveys, we've found that the vast majority of repairs are made while items are still covered by a factory warranty and that extended warranties typically protect, at relatively high cost, against a very low risk of a catastrophically expensive repair....

 

We don't recommend purchasing a warranty or service contract, because most repairs do not occur during the limited time period covered by the extended warranty."

 

Consumer Reports


Edited by m. zillch - 9/2/13 at 10:09am
post #8356 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post


Ask yourself this: Do they set their prices arbitrarily? Or do they use clever statisticians who carefully calculate the actual likelihood of product failure, over the given time, and the price to fix/replace it , to then determine a price that will be, overall , more profitable to them, the insurers, or to us, the buyers? Think about it.

Isn't the the whole purpose of a warranty or insurance, to cover your unexpected loss? If the companies didn't make money overall, they wouldn't be in business. I agree that you shouldn't buy extended warranties on electronics. That's why I look for those with the longest standard warranty (the Panny had a special at the time I bought mine to extend it to 2 years) even if it cost 5% more. If I buy a refurbished with a 90 day warranty, I make sure that I'm willing to spend that amount again at day 91 if necessary. (Not that refurbished are bad...I have a refurbished Harmony 880 that I bought in 2007 and it is still going strong and no cradle issues)
post #8357 of 8492
Lots of good feedback. I should probably start posting this on a separate forum, but bear with me for a few more posts.

I've been looking at Squaretrade-backed Ebay deals. I'm hoping to get a 1080P projector for under 1K. I've found the older PT-AE2000 available for about $850 with a Squaretrade warranty. Seller claims new lamp, but not a lot of additional info. Does this make some sense for a first projector?
post #8358 of 8492

Why don't you write the extended warranty company an email and ask just one simple question:

 

"Regarding a Panasonic PTAE2000, I specifically want to know, do you cover burnt polarizers?" Shouldn't be hard to answer, now should it?

 

When you get a response a week later, a cookie cutter form letter which doesn't even use the term "burnt polarizers", do you think  magically you will be protected by them if you ever do have a claim for that common problem?

 

Also, unless the seller can show you the actual receipt for the "new" lamp, showing it was from B&H or Provantage, then it is almost certainly an inferior "clone", and not a real-deal Panasonic made lamp. That's probably why they want to sell it in the first place! They got scammed and are now trying to pass the loss over to another person. "New lamp" huh? Yeah, I put a lot of money into items I'm right about to sell used also.:rolleyes:


Edited by m. zillch - 9/3/13 at 12:12am
post #8359 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by ledhed2222 View Post

I'm hoping to get a 1080P projector for under 1K.

I would buy a new one. Look at this link, it has several under $1K
http://www.projectorcentral.com/home-theater-multimedia-projectors.htm?sort=12#1

I actually told my Dad to look at the Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 2030 for his first home theater projector.

Don't be afraid to negotiate with the online dealers, they will sometimes come down on price, especially if you are buying a screen and / or mount from them. (I save $250 that way one my projector / screen combo).
post #8360 of 8492
Why go new over used? I've had a lot of great results buying used audio equipment; I tend to get better products than I could normally afford.

Is the difference in quality between a used projector of a higher tier and a new projector small enough that it outweighs the risks you guys bring up? I thought the after-market warranty seemed like a good idea.


Thanks for the suggestions so far; very helpful.
post #8361 of 8492

-Power zoom

-Power focus

and

-Auto CIH zoom for changing AR, or whatever they call that, are all nice but in the long run not worth it. A cheaper pj without these things makes much better sense for me, assuming I could maintain the image quality, and that's not easy to assess. I would look into a new Panasonic PT-AR100U.

 

I suspect more than 75% of 4000 owners have a 16x9 [1.78 AR] screen, NOT a 2.35 screen, and therefore the auto zoom thing lies dormant. As for power zoom and focus, they never get touched once setup in a fixed room, but if you travel with the pj, I guess they can be nice.

 

I watch about 80% 1.78 material, 10% 1.33  [old SD TV show re-runs, etc] and 10% 2.35 AR material, the only one which benefits from the auto zoom thing IF I owned a 2.35 screen.

 

Show of hands, how many people actually use a 2.35 screen with the auto zoom feature?

post #8362 of 8492
I do.....
post #8363 of 8492

^Out of curiosity, is this the your main viewing monitor for watching television?

post #8364 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

Show of hands, how many people actually use a 2.35 screen with the auto zoom feature?

This guy
post #8365 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

^Out of curiosity, is this the your main viewing monitor for watching television?

No I watch most cable content in the Living Room but occasionally for HD shows that I really enjoy I watch them in the theater.

FWIW, I do have the Auto CIH function turned off. It gets to be a pain when watching previews and for movies like Batman and Tron that switch aspects. I just switch the aspect manually.
post #8366 of 8492

As I suspected. For television viewing, which is rarely 2.35 content, I can't see how a person would prefer owning a 2.35 screen with large, unfilled boxes on both sides of the image, almost all the time.

 

People who don't use the 4000 for television, however (or at least not much) would be much better candidates for a 2.35 screen, IMHO.  [Although personally, I still wouldn't fit that camp because the DVD and Blu-rays I watch are still predominantly 1.78, not 2.35.]

post #8367 of 8492
^Good Points!

Another scenario where a scope screen makes more sense is in a height limited installation(like mine). In this scenario you make the screen as large as possible for the height and shoot the 1.78 where it falls on a 2.40 screen. Then the extra real estate on the sides is just bonus real estate you would be giving up if you went with the 1.78.

The side bars don't bother me in my room but its completely light controlled. I thought I was going to construct masking but never felt the need for it. If it were not light controlled and I watched mostly TV on it, yes I prob would have went with 1.78. But in that case I also probably wouldn't have bought the Panny 4000 either. Its not a light cannon and there are other choices for the money if your not using the zoom function.

FWIW, my scope is actually not 2.35 or 2.40. At the advice of Chris at Seymour I contstructed mine to 2.37. 2.35 don't quite get to the edge of the masking and 2.40 has a little bit of spill but I can't see having more than two zoom settings. Once the lights are out you cant see the difference.
post #8368 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

Show of hands, how many people actually use a 2.35 screen with the auto zoom feature?

i do. the auto switch to 2.35 CIH is second only to 1080p as a requirement for me. watching a film intended as a grand widescreen experience is just so much better when it's actually larger than a tv show. and that's why i have a theater.

usage is probably 90% xbox/tv series/16x9 films, 10% 2.35 films.

when i got the ae4000 i thought the auto zoom would be a neat feature, but after living with it, i would never go back.
post #8369 of 8492
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicksHitachi View Post

^Good Points!

Another scenario where a scope screen makes more sense is in a height limited installation(like mine). In this scenario you make the screen as large as possible for the height and shoot the 1.78 where it falls on a 2.40 screen. Then the extra real estate on the sides is just bonus real estate you would be giving up if you went with the 1.78.

The side bars don't bother me in my room but its completely light controlled. I thought I was going to construct masking but never felt the need for it. If it were not light controlled and I watched mostly TV on it, yes I prob would have went with 1.78. But in that case I also probably wouldn't have bought the Panny 4000 either. Its not a light cannon and there are other choices for the money if your not using the zoom function.

FWIW, my scope is actually not 2.35 or 2.40. At the advice of Chris at Seymour I contstructed mine to 2.37. 2.35 don't quite get to the edge of the masking and 2.40 has a little bit of spill but I can't see having more than two zoom settings. Once the lights are out you cant see the difference.

a couple of other good points...my old theater was 16x9 and it was able to extend between/below the tops of my tower speakers. when i did this new one as 2.40, i couldn't extend as low since the speakers were in the way.

it wasn't a big size difference on 16x9 material (in fact, with video games with a with the highest frame rates, i still have to shrink the screen/zoom out as much as possible to avoid motion sickness). but having the true panoramic view for something like lord of the rings or lawrence of arabia makes all the difference in the world.

i also planned on building some masks for the sides of the screen, but realized i didn't really need them.
post #8370 of 8492

Your post reminds me that since the lateral speakers don't move when the screen widens, would be another reason I doubt I'll ever engage this feature...

 

Maybe someone will build a little auto-speaker dolly that's triggered by a 12V signal every time you....

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