or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Spaceman Theater build - Page 6

post #151 of 1224
Just tape it and you are good to go.
post #152 of 1224
Thread Starter 
It's been me vs. the riser for the last few days. While it drew blood on more than one occasion, I think I finally conquered it. The overall depth is 8', but I'll lose 5" of that when I add 4" of OC703 to the back wall + 1" of fabric panels, so final depth will be 7'-7" +/-.

30 lb. roofing felt over existing subfloor


2x12 perimeter (shimmed all around to address crown in subfloor-MAJOR P.I.A.)






After getting half of the perimeter 2x12s up, the 8' riser depth started looking excessive, so I hauled out 2 chairs to double check clearances. I was hoping to shorten it up a bit so I could move the front row further back, but I'll need the full depth for the rear wall acoustic treatments and fully reclined seats. I'm 6'-5", so my feet stick out past the leg support by about 6".


I'm using the riser as a bass trap so I used 2x8s on joist hangers between the 2x12s. I have conduit running to 1 LV box on the face of the riser. I'll be putting a keystone plate here for an ethernet connection plus anything I might need in the future. The face of the riser also has 3 duplex outlets for power recline on the seats. I also have 4 step lights.












My stage is too shallow to have the sub behind my false wall, so I'm putting the sub behind my back row. The theater is on the 2nd floor so filling the entire riser with sand was out of the question. However, I did create a box that is the same size as the footprint of my sub and filled that with sand. It's about 180 lbs and sits over one of the floor joists. It's detached from the rest of the riser.



This build complies with all state and federal child labor laws.




After stuffing all the cavities with insulation, I topped it off with 2 layers of 3/4" OSB, using roofing felt between layers.






I don't have a router, so I put a beveled edge on the lip with a circular saw. I'll need to come up with a different plan for the stage since it has a curve.




I still need to connect the return duct that runs from the first floor to the attic. There is a sealed cavity without insulation in the corner of the riser that allows air to move from the first floor, through the cavity in the riser and to the duct. The duct will be boxed in and a symmetrical box will be built in the opposite corner of the riser. The 4 seats in the back row will recline between the two boxed areas.


post #153 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post


I don't have a router, so I put a beveled edge on the lip with a circular saw. I'll need to come up with a different plan for the stage since it has a curve.





I just used my belt sander to put a rounded edge to the top and bottom of the riser lip.
post #154 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZGAMD View Post

I just used my belt sander to put a rounded edge to the top and bottom of the riser lip.

I don't have one of those either, but might need to look at one for the stage.
post #155 of 1224
Looking real nice and clean there. Good luck moving forward with the stage now!

jim
post #156 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

...My current plan has the front row 9'-6" from the screen. I'm currently leaning towards a 100" 16:9 AT screen, which will put me back 1.14x screen width with a horizontal viewing angle pushing 50 degrees (actually 48). I realize I'm pushing the limits on both of these guidelines, but I'm afraid anything under 100" will seem small for the back row. With a 100" screen, I'll have my center behind the screen with L&R off to the sides. My room will be a tad under 12 1/2' wide after acoustic treatments, so a 100" screen will be slightly less than 70% of room width...

...Does a 100" 16:9 seem like a good solution for my space or am I missing something that would make a scope format a valid option?

My seating distance is 9'6" and I am projecting onto a 109" 16:9 screen using the Epson 8700. I would have liked to have more distance but my room is much more limited in space than even yours (9'8" wide after drywall). My old theater had the first row at 10' projecting on a 110" screen using a Panny AE900U so I knew the size vs. distance wouldn't bother me. At 9'6" Blu-rays look amazing and I have not regretted the size at all. Although I can't see the holes in the weave of the screen I do notice the texture once in awhile, but only if I am looking for it. I put in Transformers (standard DVD) for some friends a few weeks ago to show them the theater. They ended up sitting down and watched almost the entire movie before they realized how late it was. In the end I do not think you will regret going bigger, but you will if you go smaller.
post #157 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimim View Post

Looking real nice and clean there. Good luck moving forward with the stage now!

jim

Thanks, Jim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZGAMD View Post

My seating distance is 9'6" and I am projecting onto a 109" 16:9 screen using the Epson 8700. I would have liked to have more distance but my room is much more limited in space than even yours (9'8" wide after drywall). My old theater had the first row at 10' projecting on a 110" screen using a Panny AE900U so I knew the size vs. distance wouldn't bother me. At 9'6" Blu-rays look amazing and I have not regretted the size at all. Although I can't see the holes in the weave of the screen I do notice the texture once in awhile, but only if I am looking for it. I put in Transformers (standard DVD) for some friends a few weeks ago to show them the theater. They ended up sitting down and watched almost the entire movie before they realized how late it was. In the end I do not think you will regret going bigger, but you will if you go smaller.

Wow, 9'-8" is pretty narrow. I'll be taking a field trip to Jautor's theater in the coming weeks to get a better feel for different sizes from a 9'-6" viewing distance.
post #158 of 1224
I was sitting infront of a 120 diagonal 16:9 the other day. I was 11' and was very very comfortable. We moved the chairs up to 10' and still very comfortable! I think once u go to see his room u r going to change ur mind. . On paper everything is so much diff I'm finding out. Everyone says they always ended up going larger and always was like I won't but then was in this room and I now have seen the light. I'm going up to 120 wide now. I thought 110 was pushing it for my space but not now.
post #159 of 1224
Thread Starter 
I was in HD tonight stocking up on supplies and ran across a product called QuietBrace sound deadening structural sheathing. It caught my eye because the sheets are solid black.

According to the literature, it has a higher noise reduction coefficient but is not as dense as plywood or OSB. Less dense is usually a bad thing in terms of sound proofing so I'd be interested to hear the opinions of some of the sound control experts. Is there any use for this stuff in theater construction?

http://www.templeinland.com/Building...qbbenefits.asp
post #160 of 1224
I'm far from an expert on the physics of soundproofing, but the product and their test data seems a little finicky to me. They rank materials on a chart of "noise reduction coefficients" without really defining what that means. It seems very strange that batt insulation could have a value of 1.0 while drywall is only .05. I think it is pretty obvious that a wall of drywall will stop more noise than a wall made only of fiberglass batts.

I think their values are strictly pertaining to the absorption of the material. In that case it makes sense that batt insulation would be higher than drywall, but absorption is arguably the least important aspect of sound isolation.

Do you know how much a sheet of it was? It sounds interesting but I certainly wouldn't pay much more (if anything) for it over standard osb.
post #161 of 1224
Thread Starter 
I don't recall the price but I'll take a look the next time I'm there. I don't think it was cheaper than std OSB.
post #162 of 1224
Thread Starter 
I originally wanted the stage to be a little lower than the riser, but was having difficulty coming up with a fabric panel layout that worked with two different heights. So to make it easy on myself, the stage and riser are the same height (2 layers of 3/4" OSB on top of 2x12s for the upper level, 2 layers of 3/4" OSB on top of ripped 2x6s for the steps). Like the riser, shims were necessary to keep everything level. Another excuse to break out the laser level.















Just waiting for some 3/4" OSB.
post #163 of 1224
Looks sweet!
post #164 of 1224
Well done!!!
post #165 of 1224
I've been meaning to check out your thread for a while...always gotta check out the H-town threads (went to college and grad school there!). Love this quote from you:

"My OCD tendencies would prevent me from ever becoming a contractor, at least one who would make any money."

Truer words never spoken. The theater is looking great!!
post #166 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaustin View Post

Looks sweet!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

Well done!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rs691919 View Post

The theater is looking great!!

Thanks guys. Time to start focusing on the items I've been intentionally avoiding (column design, fabric panels vs. track, color scheme, etc.). Also need to order my OC703 or equivalent.
post #167 of 1224
Very, very nice Spaceman! It takes me back to when I was at the stage that you are now. This is hard labour, but VERY rewarding when it's done and you can actually walk around on the riser and the stage.

Enjoy,

Will
post #168 of 1224
Cool beans! Looking good! the stage ceiling lines look nice.

jim
post #169 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbejaan View Post

Very, very nice Spaceman! It takes me back to when I was at the stage that you are now. This is hard labour, but VERY rewarding when it's done and you can actually walk around on the riser and the stage.

Enjoy,

Will

Thanks Will. Hard labor indeed. I'm only 40 (yes aaustin, ONLY 40) but have had to hit the aspirin bottle on more than one occasion to get started the next day. Some days, it feels like I have the knees of an 80 year old.
post #170 of 1224
Any reason why you didn't put sand in your stage?
post #171 of 1224
Very nice progress. Everything is looking great.
post #172 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

I'm only 40 (yes aaustin, ONLY 40)

You old fart!

post #173 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimim View Post

Cool beans! Looking good! the stage ceiling lines look nice.

jim

Thanks Jim. I'm sure most on this forum will appreciate the planning and hard work that went into getting the ceiling curve to match the stage curve. The clock has started to see if a family member even notices.
post #174 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdika17 View Post

Any reason why you didn't put sand in your stage?

My 2nd floor theater would have quickly become a 1st floor theater if I filled the stage with sand. However, I did create a sand-filled box in my riser, since the sub is being tucked behind the 2nd row of seats.
post #175 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Thanks Jim. I'm sure most on this forum will appreciate the planning and hard work that went into getting the ceiling curve to match the stage curve. The clock has started to see if a family member even notices.

I matched the curve on mine and nobody has ever mentioned it. It is all these little details though that give you a general impression of the space. People may not notice specifics but they do have an impression that things are done right.
post #176 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post


Thanks Jim. I'm sure most on this forum will appreciate the planning and hard work that went into getting the ceiling curve to match the stage curve. The clock has started to see if a family member even notices.

My wife would never comment on that so in my house the clock's battery would run out!
post #177 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockmonkey2000 View Post


I matched the curve on mine and nobody has ever mentioned it. It is all these little details though that give you a general impression of the space. People may not notice specifics but they do have an impression that things are done right.

My neighbor asked why I wasted so much lumbar for my walls. I stopped and didn't even start to explain anything else. Only reason he was down there was he offered to help me carry in the skid of lumbar for the rest of the basement. His wife prob told him to get over there to see what was going on! Lol
post #178 of 1224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimim View Post

My neighbor asked why I wasted so much lumbar for my walls. I stopped and didn't even start to explain anything else. Only reason he was down there was he offered to help me carry in the skid of lumbar for the rest of the basement. His wife prob told him to get over there to see what was going on! Lol

I've been waiting for one of my neighbors or the nosy HOA to stop by and ask what I'm up to. "Well, I've got some smurf tube, some Linacoustic, some play sand, and some pretty fabric. Isn't it obvious?"
post #179 of 1224
Thread Starter 
I ordered my insulation for the back wall and corner bass traps today. Got a really great price from General Insulation. It's a national distributor, so you might want to look them up if you are getting ready to order insulation.

My stacked triangles will be cut from unfaced 2" Knauf board (3 pcf). Each board came in at $1.00/sf. For comparison, the best quote I received for unfaced 2" OC703 was $1.70/sf.

The back wall will have 4" of material. It was cheaper for me to do a double layer of 2" rather than a single layer of 4", so the first 2" layer will be the same unfaced panels as the corner traps. The second 2" layer will have the FSK facing. Those boards came in at $1.39/sf. My best quote for faced 2" OC703 was $2.40/sf, so I was able to save quite a bit by shopping around. Hope to pick everything up the middle of next week.
post #180 of 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

I've been waiting for one of my neighbors or the nosy HOA to stop by and ask what I'm up to. "Well, I've got some smurf tube, some Linacoustic, some play sand, and some pretty fabric. Isn't it obvious?"

lol ah ya very obvious! aren't ur neighbors smart? lol
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home