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Optoma HD66 - First 3D home theatre/gaming projector

post #1 of 1340
Thread Starter 
Sounds interesting.

"OPTOMA BEGINS SHIPPING FIRST 3D READY
HD HOME THEATER PROJECTOR

New HD66 Offers Gamers and Movie-Watchers
an Affordable 3D Projection Experience

MILPITAS, Calif. | December 1, 2009 | Delivering HD and 3D together in a single home entertainment projector, Optoma Technology, Inc., the #1 selling brand of DLP® projectors worldwide, introduces the HD66, Optoma’s first 3D Ready HD home theater projector, that delivers subtle details with striking clarity in 720p and targets consumers looking for the latest in gaming and entertainment technologies. The HD66 will have an end-user price of $699.00."

Optoma Introduces First 3D Ready HD Home Theater/Gaming Projector - HomeToys Home Technology News





Looks a bit chunkier then the HD65...

EDIT. Have resized the images
post #2 of 1340
Those pictures aren't nearly big enough.

I wonder if there are any changes to optics and overall picture quality.
post #3 of 1340
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mendo View Post

Those pictures aren't nearly big enough.

I wonder if there are any changes to optics and overall picture quality.

I've resized the images. They were huge.

I'm wondering about the quality of the projector also. It seems pretty cheap. I can't wait to read a review of some proper stereoscopic 3D gaming etc...
post #4 of 1340
2500ansi lumen rating for a home theater projector? Geez. Of course I'm sure the calibrated lumens won't be near that, but that's a higher than normal rating.
post #5 of 1340
wow, this is really interesting. I was just on the nvidia 3D vision page and read the thread there. Listed on VA, but shows as 'order today' vs. 'in stock'

looks like there is no way I'll be getting a replacement bulb for my aging ae-900. Can't wait to see what gets announced at CES, but I really wonder if there will be anything 1080p/hdmi 1.4 projectors out in 2010....this might be a nice, low cost way for big screen 3D in the (hopefully) very near future...

now to try and decide on what new video card to get.....
post #6 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTyson View Post

2500ansi lumen rating for a home theater projector? Geez. Of course I'm sure the calibrated lumens won't be near that, but that's a higher than normal rating.

Remember for the 3D, you'll be wear glasses so you'll probably need the extra brightness...
post #7 of 1340
Remember, You can Stack 2 regular 1080p projectors on top of each other
and set them up for 3D as well.. (2 HD20s for example)
post #8 of 1340
The Optoma hd66 is apparently in stock now at Amazon.com. Can't wait to see a review.
post #9 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBluePill View Post

Remember, You can Stack 2 regular 1080p projectors on top of each other
and set them up for 3D as well.. (2 HD20s for example)

Kinda of a waste if you watch non 3d material...
post #10 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by jddcp View Post

The Optoma hd66 is apparently in stock now at Amazon.com. Can't wait to see a review.

With the BD 3D spec. finalized, should be interesting 2010 for 3D...
post #11 of 1340
Optoma was waiting for Sony. Should be interesting I'll have to get a demo to try out.
post #12 of 1340
I'm considering this projector as the Acer H5360 seems to be dragging it's feet coming to the U.S. any time soon. I am wanting to use for nVidia 3D Vision, but it's not officially certified :\\ Of course the Acer is tho... and it's not available here.
post #13 of 1340
Rainier2,
Do you have the Nvidia 3D vision system? If so, can you help me understand how the monitor support actually works?

If one has a projector (or any display) that will sync to a signal at 120Hz, will the Nvidia system work? I have a hard time understanding how if I can get a computer desktop to work at a given resolution at 120Hz, why the 3D system would NOT work. All the talk about certified monitors really seems like a negative for Nvidia.....very confusing to say the least.

guitarman,
Any idea where the extra brightness on the HD66 comes from vs. the HD65 (2500 vs. 1600)? The lamp on the HD66 spec sheet states 185W P-VIP while the HD65 is listed as just 180W. It looks like P-VIP is OSRAM - not sure what lamp type the HD65 has.

Hopefully, the bulb accounts for some of the spec difference and it is not just bumped up specs or a clear section on the colorwheel.
post #14 of 1340
@jeff:

Yes I have nVidia 3D Vision!

Basically the set up runs a wizard and determines if you're set up for the shutter glasses. If your projector is hooked up to your PC, try running this: http://www.nvidia.com/object/GeForce...atibility.html

There is an option to run a "generic DLP or CRT" in the wizard so most likely if Windows knows your projector's specs then you should be able to do 120hz w/ 3D Vision. I am currently running a Dell CRT until I get a projector and I choose "Generic CRT". It's capable of 120hz but I run it at 100hz at higher res cause I can't tell the difference in the flicker. I've heard it's even less noticeable on projectors! 85 hz is even tolerable, imo, but nothing below 100hz is supported from nVidia.

I will tell you that this tech is the best 3D tech out there. It's better than IMAX better than realD. Breathtaking. Avatar the game will be your first purchase.

Which projector you have?
post #15 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff J View Post

Rainier2,
Do you have the Nvidia 3D vision system? If so, can you help me understand how the monitor support actually works?

If one has a projector (or any display) that will sync to a signal at 120Hz, will the Nvidia system work? I have a hard time understanding how if I can get a computer desktop to work at a given resolution at 120Hz, why the 3D system would NOT work. All the talk about certified monitors really seems like a negative for Nvidia.....very confusing to say the least.

guitarman,
Any idea where the extra brightness on the HD66 comes from vs. the HD65 (2500 vs. 1600)? The lamp on the HD66 spec sheet states 185W P-VIP while the HD65 is listed as just 180W. It looks like P-VIP is OSRAM - not sure what lamp type the HD65 has.

Hopefully, the bulb accounts for some of the spec difference and it is not just bumped up specs or a clear section on the colorwheel.

Most likely it's the new line of Phillips lamps they produce higher brightness at lower wattage levels.
post #16 of 1340
@ Rainier2,
thanks. I have a Benq MP776 ST for the short term. It just failed the test that you linked to with the desktop running at 120Hz - with a note to review the full list of supported monitors. it also failed for video card (expected - currently using a 7950, the new 9800 arrives tomorrow) and OS (not expected - running windows 7).

I'm going to hazard a guess that a DVI doctor could be a workaround for an unsupported display - like the HD66 - if the generic DLP option does not work. However, one would have to find a supported display to program the DVI doctor with the EDID....unless there is some way to program the DR. using a computer. anyway, I should have the pc up tomorrow with the new video card to see if it works with this benq.

hopefully, someone will pull the trigger on the HD66 and give us a first hand report....


@ guitarman,
thanks - it would be awesome if you could ask your Optoma contacts the specs on the HD66 color wheel....
post #17 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainier2 View Post

I'm considering this projector as the Acer H5360 seems to be dragging it's feet coming to the U.S. any time soon. I am wanting to use for nVidia 3D Vision, but it's not officially certified :\\ Of course the Acer is tho... and it's not available here.

Yesterday I got my 5360 ... nice toy :-)
post #18 of 1340
DagoDuck - where did you get it?
post #19 of 1340
Might be helpful for everybody, if you are running 3D, to list your setup/equipment...
post #20 of 1340
disappointing initial news on the HD66 for those looking to use this with the Nvida system - here.

Hopefully, Optoma can get Nvidia to get off their rear and get the HD66 certified.

my testing with the benq is delayed another day.. the NVIDIA system does not work very well when you forget the IR emitter at home
post #21 of 1340
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff J View Post

disappointing initial news on the HD66 for those looking to use this with the Nvida system - here.

Hopefully, Optoma can get Nvidia to get off their rear and get the HD66 certified.

my testing with the benq is delayed another day.. the NVIDIA system does not work very well when you forget the IR emitter at home

Ha ha. I'm looking forward to your review when you remember the IR emitter.
post #22 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff J View Post

disappointing initial news on the HD66 for those looking to use this with the Nvida system - here.

Hopefully, Optoma can get Nvidia to get off their rear and get the HD66 certified.

my testing with the benq is delayed another day.. the NVIDIA system does not work very well when you forget the IR emitter at home

It sounds like there are many issues with Nvidia drivers already. It's bleeding edge stuff so there will be growing pains for sure...
post #23 of 1340
I dont want to take this ot to the HD66, so here are some initial impressions on the nvidia setup using the 3d capable benq projector.

I think it should be easy to get the nividia system to work with the HD66. I was able to get everything setup with the benq using an analogue connection for the initial setup, then had no issue getting it to run using the digital connection.

interested to see some first hand reports of the HD66....and also to see what gets announced at CES.
post #24 of 1340
I was going to pick up the hd65, but is there any reason not to go with the hd66? 3d is not important to me at this point. Can't the hd66 only be an improvement over the 65, or am I missing something?
post #25 of 1340
That's a good question and I am certainly interested in the same thing. We are expecting that the better bulb will at least result in an incremental improvement and both units are more or less the same price so if all else is equal, I would say that the HD66 is a better choice. We just have to wait for a decent review though.
post #26 of 1340
Here is a comparison of the two according to BB. Price of HD65 is still higher than HD66 ...

Model HD66 HD65
Type DLP DLP
Viewable Screen Size 26.5" - 348" 26.5" - 348" (diagonal)
Throw Ratio Range 1.55 - 1.7:1 1.55 - 1.7:1
Maximum Resolution 1920 x 1080 1280 x 720
Native Resolution 1280 x 720 1280 x 720
Aspect Ratio 16:9 16:9
Brightness 2500 lumens 1600 ANSI lumens
Contrast Ratio 4000:1 3000:1 (4000:1 in ImageAI mode)
Lamp Type 180W 180W
Lamp Life Up to 2000 hours in standard mode; up to 3000 hours in eco mode Up to 2000 hours in standard mode (up to 3000 hours in ECO mode)
Projector Type Business Projectors Home Theater Projectors
Product Height 8" 3.3"
Product Width 15.5" 10.2"
Product Weight 6.4 lbs. 4 lbs.
Product Depth 13.25" 8"
post #27 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by fsullivan3 View Post

Here is a comparison of the two according to BB. Price of HD65 is still higher than HD66 ...

Wow! Thanks for posting that. Here I thought that they were more or less the same size. I was also under the impression that the HD66 bulb lasted longer.
post #28 of 1340
Maybe I should ask this probably dumb question somewhere - please let me know.

Yesterday I saw "Avatar" in 3D - HATED the story/plot but was impressed with the 3D effect even though it is in its infancy.

THE QUESTION: Why can't they simply create a copy of the screen image that could be played on any regular TV or projector screen and retain the 3D effect if you wear the glasses? - In other words, if I had a HD camcorder in the commercial theater and shot the Avatar 3D right off the theater screen wouldn't I get pretty much the same effect on my home projector screen if I played my video while wearing the glasses?

Why de theater and home units require an expensive upgrade? Why can't they just replicate the image for playback on all legacy equipment?
Thanks
post #29 of 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by imjay View Post

Maybe I should ask this probably dumb question somewhere - please let me know.

Yesterday I saw "Avatar" in 3D - HATED the story/plot but was impressed with the 3D effect even though it is in its infancy.

THE QUESTION: Why can't they simply create a copy of the screen image that could be played on any regular TV or projector screen and retain the 3D effect if you wear the glasses? - In other words, if I had a HD camcorder in the commercial theater and shot the Avatar 3D right off the theater screen wouldn't I get pretty much the same effect on my home projector screen if I played my video while wearing the glasses?

Why de theater and home units require an expensive upgrade? Why can't they just replicate the image for playback on all legacy equipment?
Thanks

3D Stereoscopic movies work by projecting a different image to the left and right eye. In a 2D movie they both see the same thing. To record a movie in 3D from a movie theater you would need to have 2 video cameras that are perfectly synced together to record at the exact same moment and stay in sync throughout. One camera would need to be placed behind the left lens of the glasses, and the other on the right. You would then need to use software on the PC to play back the left and right video feeds in sync on a compatible monitor.

The reason you cannot view stereoscopic 3D content on your current equipment unless you use anaglyph is due to the way 3D works. The NVIDIA 3D Vision bundle uses active shutter glasses that work by a "frame sequential" method (except for DLP rear-projection HDTVs that use checkerboard shutter method). In frame sequential, the screen shows the left eye, then right eye using all the pixels (commonly referred to as 1080p per eye) and the glasses sync up with this. What this does is when the left image is shown on the screen, the glasses block the right lens so only your left eye can see the picture. This happens 120 time per second (120hz) so it is fluid and does not cause headaches/nausea. Current monitors and HDTVs can only do 60hz which is not fast enough.

HDTVs advertised as 120hz or 240hz are not 3D capable because they cannot accept a 120hz signal via HDMI. They only multiply the 60hz signal to make it more fluid. A tv needs to accept 120hz via HDMI for it to be 3D capable.
post #30 of 1340
Okay - but I'll stay a bit "dense" for one more go cause I'm not sure I got a complete answer (no offense) - maybe I just still don't understand.

I sat in a theater and my eyeballs watched a screen image. Parts of that image looked out of whack but when I put the glasses on it became "3D".

The 3D screen image content appears on the theater screen at the same time. I'm not talking about dual 60 cycle stereo projection that requires shutter glasses. So, if my eyeballs can see the entire image why not a capture device or camera?

The Theater showing Avatar in 3D used simple passive glasses with polarized lenses - not shutter type. Cheap things that we were allowed to tote out of the theater and I am sitting here looking at them.

So, back to my question.

If you can capture the 3D screen image on the theater screen and then play those captured full screen images via a legacy PJ and wall screen and you wear the glasses why won't you see the screen image exactly as your eyes saw it in the theater?
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