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Red Cliff: Part I and Red Cliff: Part II comparison *PIX* - Page 4

post #91 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreasy969 View Post

Part I of the US version has a running time of 2:25:24. The HK DVD (NTSC) of Part I has a running time of 2:25:23. So I think it's pretty safe to say, there is nothing missing on the US release of Part I.

Part II of the US version has a running time of 2:21:30. The HK DVD (NTSC) of Part II has running time of 2:21:23. So here the US is 7 seconds longer, but this should be due to 2 additional US specific studio clips at the beginning of the movie on the US release (Part I doesn't have these clips at the beginning).

So I'm sure, the US is completely uncut.

The UK cuts aren't a rumor, they've been confirmed at least for the UK DVD release: http://www.movie-censorship.com/report.php?ID=5262792.
I didn't check for the horse falls on the US yet, but there is no reason why the US should contain these cuts, as these are UK specific cuts, due to the 'Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act'.

Thanks. Very useful. U.S. version it is then. Someone just asked about subtitle differences b/w the versions. I hadn't thought about that, but it's certainly a pertinent question (wouldn't want another 'Let the Right One In' type fiasco). Any insight on subtitle variations?
post #92 of 126
Are the subtitles for the American version contained entirely within the picture or are they half in the letterbox bars? One of the nice things about the UK disc is that the subs are entirely within the picture. Even though I'm not running a CIH setup, having them in the picture makes them easier to read while also making it easier to watch the film itself. I don't get distracted by noticing the letterbox bars through the whole film.
post #93 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deviation View Post

Are the subtitles for the American version contained entirely within the picture or are they half in the letterbox bars? One of the nice things about the UK disc is that the subs are entirely within the picture. Even though I'm not running a CIH setup, having them in the picture makes them easier to read while also making it easier to watch the film itself. I don't get distracted by noticing the letterbox bars through the whole film.

The subtitles on the US are completely within the picture too. And I'd like to add, that they aren't as tiny as the UK subtitles (I don't own the UK release, but I've seen subtitled screen shots). IMHO the subtitles on the US should be easier on the eye.
post #94 of 126
I know it's DVDbeaver, but the combined/theatrical/Western cut disc looks decidedly softer than the other version: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDRe...on_blu-ray.htm

look at the shot with the ships. But again, it could be beaver screwing things up.
post #95 of 126
Why is the tiawan version showing more information than the rest? Shouldn't the 2.35:1 versions be the OAR?
post #96 of 126
saprano, it's open matte.
post #97 of 126
Oh i see, forgot about that. Thanks.
post #98 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckZ View Post

saprano, it's open matte.

aka Super35 (blechh).

Another reason I prefer anamorphic Panavision is that there's no "guessing" what the proper framing is. 50 years from now we'll have people trying to guess what the proper framing was on a lot of current features because the director or cinematographer are long since passed.
post #99 of 126
Interesting that you list the U.S. version as being encoded with VC-1 whereas Blu-ray.com lists it as MPEG-4 AVC.

Mistake on their behalf perhaps?
post #100 of 126
We need some subtitle comparison screenshots
post #101 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckZ View Post

Interesting that you list the U.S. version as being encoded with VC-1 whereas Blu-ray.com lists it as MPEG-4 AVC.

Mistake on their behalf perhaps?

They probably just copied over the specs from the HK disc.
post #102 of 126
Amazon has two versions of the movie, one is the Original International Version while the other is the Theatrical Version.

Which version is advised? I haven't watched the film yet. I am surprised how the Theatrical Version is almost 100 minutes less than the International Version.
post #103 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetvar26 View Post

Amazon has two versions of the movie, one is the Original International Version while the other is the Theatrical Version.

Which version is advised? I haven't watched the film yet. I am surprised how the Theatrical Version is almost 100 minutes less than the International Version.

The "international" version consists of both Parts 1 & 2 in their entirety each on a separate disc. Both parts were originally released in the theaters separately in certain countries.

The "theatrical" version is a re-edit of both parts down to one film, which ultimately meant that a lot of stuff had to be cut out.

CC
post #104 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccfixx View Post

The "international" version consists of both Parts 1 & 2 in their entirety each on a separate disc. Both parts were originally released in the theaters separately in certain countries.

The "theatrical" version is a re-edit of both parts down to one film, which ultimately meant that a lot of stuff had to be cut out.

CC

Oh Thanks, guess I will be getting the International Edition then
post #105 of 126
Just picked up a Canadian release of Red Cliff marketed as 'Extended Version', no idea which version this is comparable to. 2 discs, 146 minutes and 142 minutes (288 total). Released through E1 entertainment. Packed in a slim eco-line vortex packaging with slip cover.

post #106 of 126
Judging from the running time on both discs in the Canadian "Extended Edition" it seems to be US Part I and II - which is the "international" edition.
post #107 of 126
I got the UK spec version and it works on my PS3 but not on my friend's. Will update solve this? Mine is 1st gen where I can play PS2 games.
post #108 of 126
Amazon recently lowered their price on the U.S. Blu-ray release of "Red Cliff" International Version to $15.99 USD. If I already have the UK Blu-ray, is there any reason to re-buy this title in its U.S. version?
post #109 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlad Theimpaler View Post

Amazon recently lowered their price on the U.S. Blu-ray release of "Red Cliff" International Version to $15.99 USD. If I already have the UK Blu-ray, is there any reason to re-buy this title in its U.S. version?

The UK version has a few horse falls edited out.
post #110 of 126
Spare copies would make excellent gifts for the uninitiated
post #111 of 126
I've read through the forum threads already made concerning blu-rays of Red Cliff I & II but didn't see anyone describing the problem I'm having with my discs. I have the Mei Ah blu-rays and for both films there is a sync issue between the audio and video where the video is slightly ahead of the audio. This occurs using 2 different receivers and both a Mitsu rear-projection and an Epson front projector. The constant is my PS3, however, I don't see this issue with any other discs.

Has anyone else encountered this problem with these Blu-Rays? Thank you.
post #112 of 126
I have the Special Edition UK Blu-ray of Red Cliff, and I noticed the same thing on my version. Doesn't bother me as much as English movies since I'm reading subtitles anyway, but I definitely noticed it.
post #113 of 126
I thought it was a dubbing issues? Since some of the actors spoke Mandarin. They were later dubbed into Cantonese, to match the other actors.
post #114 of 126
Lip sync issues had already been discussed in the other thread. It's often confusing to have two threads on the same film.

As I said there, John Woo's wife wrote a book on the filming and said there were extraneous noises in some locations so the audio had to be edited later. I think possibly some could have been re-dubbed. More care should have been taken on the synchronisation.

In the context of the story it doesn't make sense to listen to the dubbed Cantonese version, only the Mandarin should be regarded as authentic. Apart from a Japanese actor, all the main actors I believe spoke Mandarin during filming.
post #115 of 126
I think Tony Leung's synching is way out which leads me to believe that he was speaking Cantonese during filming.

But the Mandarin dubbing sounds like his voice so maybe he just wasn't comfortable enough with the language on set and worked on his dialect later.

Even Takeshi Kaneshiro appears to be speaking Mandarin based on his nouth synching.

But I may be wrong. The movie is awesome regardless.
post #116 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by momaw View Post

Another example is toward the beginning of Part 2 where they open the gates to Cao Cao's encampment and you can see the goodyear tyres attached as rollers to the gates. I might be a little hazy on my history, but I'm pretty sure they didn't use rubber car tyres to assist with opening gates during the Han Dynasty circa 206 BCE - 220 CE.

The period is actually post Han dynasty.

These 2 films have totally nothing to do with the Chinese classic Romance of the 3 Kingdoms. They took a perfectly good story and destroyed it. Just treat it as pure B movie entertainment.
post #117 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by specuvestor View Post

They took a perfectly good story and destroyed it. Just treat it as pure B movie entertainment.

I don't care about any factual accuracy. John Woo's RED CLIFF is amazingly entertaining and masterfully assembled.
post #118 of 126
Imagine Peter Jackson tried making Frodo a better swordsman than the Strider. That's how bad the story got twisted.

LOTR and Romance of the 3 kingdoms are CLASSICS for a reason. Personally I saw part 1 at the movies with eager anticipation and gave up.

I'm just commenting on the storyline so people don't think Chinese classics are a joke
post #119 of 126
Fair enough.

But RED CLIFF is still a supremely entertaining picture.
post #120 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash Bailey View Post

I think Tony Leung's synching is way out which leads me to believe that he was speaking Cantonese during filming.

But the Mandarin dubbing sounds like his voice so maybe he just wasn't comfortable enough with the language on set and worked on his dialect later.

Even Takeshi Kaneshiro appears to be speaking Mandarin based on his nouth synching.

I think it is T Leung's voice and accent too. He doesn't have a long dialogue part so he should be able to manage it and there could be some post-production re-dubbing.

I'm sure TK spoke Mandarin (he is half Taiwanese and it sounds like his voice) but I was referring to another Japanese actor who played a general and would have been dubbed. He spoke very little in any case.

Don't want to go into details but part I is fairly close to the original classical text in broad sense but a substantial part of part II is not.
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