or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread - Page 40

post #1171 of 3008
Very nice indeed Mario. Sorry I haven't read the whole thread, but are you really going to put in a star ceiling? That big? That's one of my dreams..one day! Paul
post #1172 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterm3732 View Post

Very nice indeed Mario. Sorry I haven't read the whole thread, but are you really going to put in a star ceiling? That big? That's one of my dreams..one day! Paul

Hi Paul. Thanks. I'm planning on doing a painted star ceiling down the road from Night Sky Murals. I just don't have the patience or time to do the fiber optic star ceiling and I think the Night Sky Murals look fantastic because you can do so many more stars than you could do with fiber optic. In a perfect world I would have done both.
post #1173 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Got a late start tonight but did accomplish some things.

I was impressed on how well the kreg screws and glue held the three large pieces of oak for the front step together. I didn't get too bold, but I was able to lift, flip and position it without creating any cross braces for it. Once in position, I routed out the top and sanded.







I then finished making and sizing all my oak pieces for the top of the stage.

Ready for assembly with the Kreg jig again.



Glued and screwed upside down on the stage.


I'm hoping I'll have some time tomorrow night to sand the front and put on the bottom lip.

I'm holding off on doing the bull nose areas for now since I'll be constantly walking by them to construct the front stage. I'll wait until the front is closer to completion.
post #1174 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Hi Paul. Thanks. I'm planning on doing a painted star ceiling down the road from Night Sky Murals.

A super low cost projector of some type projecting the Northern Lights on that night sky, would really be wild.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Got a late start tonight but did accomplish some things.

I was impressed on how well the kreg screws and glue held the three large pieces of oak for the front step together. I didn't get too bold, but I was able to lift, flip and position it without creating any cross braces for it.


We were told in HS wood shop many moons ago, and in every woodworking magazine I've ever read since then. Both always have said if you use the correct type of glue for the application, that a good properly done glue joint in wood, is stronger than the wood itself. And in many tests done by woodworking magazine, the wood itself fails before the glue joint does. Because the tests are done to stress the joint, and because the glue soaks into the wood to a certain degree, the wood usually rips apart somewhere next to the glue joint.
post #1175 of 3008
Mario - Nice woodworking job on those stairs and stage. How do you plan to finish them? In your renderings they are black, do plan on using an ebony stain and poly, or are you applying a dye and lacquer?
post #1176 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnla View Post

A super low cost projector of some type projecting the Northern Lights on that night sky, would really be wild.

We were told in HS wood shop many moons ago, and in every woodworking magazine I've ever read since then. Both always have said if you use the correct type of glue for the application, that a good properly done glue joint in wood, is stronger than the wood itself. And in many tests done by woodworking magazine, the wood itself fails before the glue joint does. Because the tests are done to stress the joint, and because the glue soaks into the wood to a certain degree, the wood usually rips apart somewhere next to the glue joint.

Johnla,
I had thought about that a while back. But given where the projector would need to be mounted (in the tray), you'd probably end up needing multiple to cover the area. Lots of other technical issues but a cool idea.

Not sure if mine wood joint was properly done, but that's good to know. Kind of wish I would have taken woodshop back in high school now too.
post #1177 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phisch View Post

Mario - Nice woodworking job on those stairs and stage. How do you plan to finish them? In your renderings they are black, do plan on using an ebony stain and poly, or are you applying a dye and lacquer?


That's a good question. I hadn't really figured this out yet. As usual, I'm open to suggestions and do's and dont's.
post #1178 of 3008
Just wanted to chime in and say that I admire your woodworking skills. Looks like you will have a great stage, congrats and good luck on your project.
post #1179 of 3008
Looking very nice Mario! Keep up the AWESOME job!
post #1180 of 3008
Mario, admirable work! Just finished going through this thread, and looking forward to the finished results. A question regarding your light tray/soffit. There appears to be a "notch" between the layer of plywood that the lights sit in and the second layer of drywall. Are you planning on doing something with that? are you staining the plywood tray?

I would like to do something similar...essentially extend the soffit 6 inches to put the cans in, but have the extended portion go all the way up the the ceiling. Does that sound feasible and/or make sense?
post #1181 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys for the compliments.

rs691919,

Here's a pic I posted a while back on how the tray was constructed. I didn't need L brackets, but I did use 2x4's (instead of the 2x2 pictured) to help straighten out and unify the plywood.



Initally I was going to sand and paint black. But as of right now, the plan is to put red GOM fabric on it and cut around the cans. Then use base board and crown to decorate it.

I don't see why you couldn't do what you are suggesting. Just make sure everything remains decoupled if you are tackling sound proofing as well.
post #1182 of 3008
Thanks for the info! I am planning on building the soffit (or rather having it built) within the isolation shell, so anything attached soffit is technically decoupled I *thinnk*.
post #1183 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I need to set some 3/4" material on the top of the stage (2nd layer) to level it out and meet up with the 3/4" Oak that is showing. Is it a bad idea to use 1" pine that I have laying around? It seems much lighter than if I were to use say MDF or OSB. Keep in mind subs will be on that stage.

I'm thinking Green Glue may be the best way to attach then 2nd layer on the top of the stage along with some screws in the hidden areas. Then I could shoot some finish nails through the Oak on the visible areas.
post #1184 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Recap from last nights work.


Added 1/2" base shoe to the oak top for the stage.



Finished putting 1/4" oak plywod on fronts of stage. Little tricky given the one large piece with the cutout and three 45 degree angles. I used painters tape along the cut line and cut the oak plywood upside down to prevent fraying the edges. I also notched the front step a 1/4" to snugly fit in the oak plywod. I ended up just liquid nailing it and used some carpenters glue.



Turns out I missed a screw. Didn't realize this until going through these pictures.


Now I just need to assemble the one large piece with the two side wings. I'll probably go with the Kreg Jig again. Then finish adding the base shoe to the side wings.


As of now, I'm leaning towards OSB or MDF on the remaining areas of the stage. MDF might be a little easier to maneuver the subs in/out than the OSB.
post #1185 of 3008
Awesome job. You even put professional finish carpenters to shame!
post #1186 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Awesome job. You even put professional finish carpenters to shame!

Thanks so much. It's actually not too much different than building in 3D. It's all about finding the right tool for the job. Granted, there are tons of tricks of the trade. Also, it's a little less risky moving a mouse than a saw blade rotating at 6000 rpm.
post #1187 of 3008
Very nice. I love the woodworking and and looking forward to your progress and how you finish the wood.
post #1188 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCaboNow View Post

Very nice. I love the woodworking and and looking forward to your progress and how you finish the wood.

Thanks GoCaboNow.

Here's a quick update from yesterday.

I'll post more photos later when time permits.

But I finished assembling the top layer of the stage. I ended up using Green Glue and MDF. I broke out the biscuit joiner for the first time. Pretty cool little gadget.



I spent a couple hours just cleaning up the room and vacuuming.

Now I'm ready to start assembling the front wall on top of the stage.
post #1189 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Here are some more detailed pics of Saturday's work in the theater.

Notched the oak along the wall so it will be easier to put the 3/4" MDF on the lower wall.


Marked the center of the #20 biscuit joints:


Cut biscuit joints:


Dry fitted:


Serving up a dish of green glue. I didn't feel like cleaning out the gun for such a small section:









I used biscuits to join some of the MDF to the OAK.


Cleaned up the theater before starting the next phase.
post #1190 of 3008
WOW, just wow. I even learned a few things here

Love the woodwork !
post #1191 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I'm thinking Green Glue may be the best way to attach then 2nd layer on the top of the stage along with some screws in the hidden areas. Then I could shoot some finish nails through the Oak on the visible areas.

I am pretty sure you already know this mcascio, but just in case someone else reading this isn't aware...

Green Glue isn't a glue, you can't use it to attach two pieces of wood together. It is a sound deadening material; it is placed between two solid pieces of material to help dampen sound transmission. For mcascio's stage, after applying the green glue he attached the wood to the stage with nails. If you look closely you can see the nail holes in the picture from yesterday.
post #1192 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerParty View Post

Green Glue isn't a glue

No it isn't but its darn sticky stuff all the same
post #1193 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moggie View Post


No it isn't but its darn sticky stuff all the same

I stepped on a spot the other day that was over a week old. Stuck right to my shoe. It reminds me of flubber

But yeah it isn't glue.
post #1194 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerParty View Post

I am pretty sure you already know this mcascio, but just in case someone else reading this isn't aware...

Green Glue isn't a glue, you can't use it to attach two pieces of wood together. It is a sound deadening material; it is placed between two solid pieces of material to help dampen sound transmission. For mcascio's stage, after applying the green glue he attached the wood to the stage with nails. If you look closely you can see the nail holes in the picture from yesterday.

I guess I don't know how strong it is compared to other "glues". But when I cut through two layers of 3/4" osb with green glue in between that had been sitting for probably a month, the two pieces seemed fused together.

I'm glad you pointed that out though. I'd hate for others to use it inappropriately.

As you mentioned, I'd nailed and screwed the top layer to the bottom.
post #1195 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Anyone see any issues with me using select Pine for building the front corner columns and doors below the screen? It'll be lighter and easier to build than using MDF.
post #1196 of 3008
Doubtful if it would really be seen unless someone was specifically looking at the finishes . . . but even if you did a supreme sanding and painting job on the pine, the final finish will still look different from the painted MDF of the other columns. Like I said, doubtful it would ever be noticed by any visitor, but I would probably just stick with the same material for the rest of the finish carpentry IMHO.

I can't wait to see those renderings become reality! Keep up the great work!
post #1197 of 3008
pine usually doesnt show grain after a couple of coats so i think it would look fine.

todays pine is all very soft new growth though...can gouge it with a fingernail.
post #1198 of 3008
Poplar may be a better choice if your gonna paint it. You won't have to deal with knots.
post #1199 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktm250rider View Post

Poplar may be a better choice if your gonna paint it. You won't have to deal with knots.

I did the same in my home where I have painted trim. The little more it cost deff was worth it.

jim
post #1200 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Anyone see any issues with me using select Pine for building the front corner columns and doors below the screen? It'll be lighter and easier to build than using MDF.

Depending on how your finishing the columns I say yes. I built all 7 of mine out of select pine from Menards. I painted it all black then covered with black GOM and couldnt be happier. It's very easy to work with and a bit lighter than MDF. The select pine at Menards is about the straightest lumber they have next to the red oak, maple, aspen stuff that is much more pricey. If you plan to stain/paint it and that is your final product I would suggest something more along the lines of maple, oak or birch.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread