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The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread - Page 41

post #1201 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktm250rider View Post

Poplar may be a better choice if your gonna paint it. You won't have to deal with knots.

Most of the "select" pine (at my Menards store anyway)does not have knots.
post #1202 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys for chiming in.

I think I'm opting for the Select Pine. It looks straight and comes in a variety of widths/lengths which will make it much easier to build the front wall sections. MDF would be a pain to rip to all the sizes I need and then I'd still have to treat all the edges.

Given my application, the front wall is mostly GOM fabric with the Select Pine being the frame around it. I know it's softer, but it won't be touched too much once installed and the speakers are in.

I was considering Aspen, but they just didn't have as many width options as the pine. And with everything being painted black, I don't think it will matter too much in the end.
post #1203 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Thanks guys for chiming in.

I think I'm opting for the Select Pine. It looks straight and comes in a variety of widths/lengths which will make it much easier to build the front wall sections. MDF would be a pain to rip to all the sizes I need and then I'd still have to treat all the edges.

Given my application, the front wall is mostly GOM fabric with the Select Pine being the frame around it. I know it's softer, but it won't be touched too much once installed and the speakers are in.

I was considering Aspen, but they just didn't have as many width options as the pine. And with everything being painted black, I don't think it will matter too much in the end.

I agree with you. Being painted black will cover any and all flaws.
post #1204 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I made some more progress last night. As I worked on my plans for the front wall, I needed to verify that my chair rail on the front wall landed in the same spot as what was in 3D since a cabinet door was falling just below the chair rail. I noticed it was about a 1/2" off. Which lead me to breaking out a laser level to see why.

Turns out there is a little pitch to the room. I opted to adjust a couple of the columns down in the back of the room to compensate. Because the chair rail runs in between two pieces of moulding and I have it centered within that space I didn't want to take the chance of it being noticed. I'm also putting the lower MDF wall at the exact height of the top of the chair rail. It's challenging to get tight moulding joints let alone without having to cheat things at an angle.

Once I had the laser level set I just decided to start putting up the lower wall MDF since I had the pieces already ripped.

I'll be building fabric panels for the upper portion of the wall. I'm still debating if I should just install the crown moulding first and then fit the fabric panels below or install the fabric panels and then the crown moulding directly on top of the fabric panels. Installing the crown first would give me an option to replace the fabric in the event it were damaged. Installing on top of the fabric panel requires less work and accuracy when building the panels and I don't have to worry about a clean finished edge where the crown meets the fabric panel. Any thoughts / ideas?










post #1205 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I'll be building fabric panels for the upper portion of the wall. I'm still debating if I should just install the crown moulding first and then fit the fabric panels below or install the fabric panels and then the crown moulding directly on top of the fabric panels. Installing the crown first would give me an option to replace the fabric in the event it were damaged. Installing on top of the fabric panel requires less work and accuracy when building the panels and I don't have to worry about a clean finished edge where the crown meets the fabric panel. Any thoughts / ideas?

Looking good. Took a break from trim work myself this morning. On your crown I would suggest ripping down a spacer board the thickness of your finished fabric panel. This would be positioned just above your panel with a small gap. You would then mount your crown on that spacer board and let the bottom edge of the crown fall below the the bottom edge of the spacer board. Then the fabric panel would "tuck" in behind the crown and the crown's bottom edge would provide a clean line.
post #1206 of 3008
Put a quick diagram together if my words didn't make any sense!



This way you can have a nice clean line, hide the top of the panel, and still be able to remove them.
post #1207 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedTopDown View Post

Put a quick diagram together if my words didn't make any sense!

This way you can have a nice clean line, hide the top of the panel, and still be able to remove them.

Great idea.. Might be stealing this one myself.
post #1208 of 3008
Beautiful work! I wish I had the space you have. I'm jealous. I really like your design as well, I'm thinking of something similar on a smaller scale. I haven't gone through your whole thread yet. Were you planing on staining all your trim or painting it black like your vendors?

Bud
post #1209 of 3008
Your attention to detail is stunning! Beautiful work!

I especially like your CAD drawings. I showed them to my classmates and teacher in an Engineering Design and Development class and we were all very impressed. They are some of the best and most detailed I have ever seen.
post #1210 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedTopDown View Post

Put a quick diagram together if my words didn't make any sense!



This way you can have a nice clean line, hide the top of the panel, and still be able to remove them.

This should work. Everything is coming 3/4" off the wall and the material will push it out a bit as well. So maybe if I put a slight bevel on the fabric frame, it will compensate for the depth of the fabric on both sides.

I'm dealing with the same issue at the chair rail. I originally was planning on doing something similar with the chair rail, but I can't do it with both the crown and the chair rail with out me pinning the fabric frame in there. Perhaps the crown will hold the fabric frame in and it can just rest on the chair rail assuming I make a nice tight fit.
post #1211 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinadog View Post

Beautiful work! I wish I had the space you have. I'm jealous. I really like your design as well, I'm thinking of something similar on a smaller scale. I haven't gone through your whole thread yet. Were you planing on staining all your trim or painting it black like your vendors?

Bud

It's been discussed briefly but I still need to research the best method. My goal is to make the oak black though in the end like the renders. I thought it would have been neat to have it stained with a dark red, but I don't think it will look right with the black cabinets on the dark red oak stage.
post #1212 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaustin View Post

Your attention to detail is stunning! Beautiful work!

I especially like your CAD drawings. I showed them to my classmates and teacher in an Engineering Design and Development class and we were all very impressed. They are some of the best and most detailed I have ever seen.

Wow. Thanks aaustin. I appreciate the kind words.
post #1213 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I made a nice dent in the theater yesterday.

I finished leveling and mounting all the in-room columns and installing some more of the lower 3rd MDF on the wall. I also ended up putting another gang box in the front column where I put in a cat5 cable. That will allow IR control of any LED step lighting.







post #1214 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I also discovered that I should be able to use my 16 ga finish nailer to secure the backside of the bull nosing (along with glue). I know Moggie screwed his down, but the finish nailer will take all the guess work out of it and shoot it in at the perfect angle each time.
post #1215 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post


This should work. Everything is coming 3/4" off the wall and the material will push it out a bit as well. So maybe if I put a slight bevel on the fabric frame, it will compensate for the depth of the fabric on both sides.

I'm dealing with the same issue at the chair rail. I originally was planning on doing something similar with the chair rail, but I can't do it with both the crown and the chair rail with out me pinning the fabric frame in there. Perhaps the crown will hold the fabric frame in and it can just rest on the chair rail assuming I make a nice tight fit.

Not sure how much space you will have, but you could do the same thing with the chair rail. If you can leave more space above the fabric panel with the spacer board, you can push the fabric panel up enough to clear the char rail, push it against the wall, then let it drop down into the space behind the chair rail. You might need to just make your top rail of the panel a little thinner than the rest of the frame to allow for the angle when you insert.
post #1216 of 3008
Thread Starter 
RedTopDown,

I don't think there's much surface area on the crown to move the spacer board too far up...maybe a 1/4" or so. But I think I just need a little bit of a lip. I'll play with the idea as it gets closer to that time. I'm still trying to see if there are any other options too.

So I'm still trying to nail down the front and make sure I can get the subs in/out.

I'm leaning towards removing the chair rail from the front in order to make the cabinet door 3" bigger to about a 2'3" tall opening. That should get me a 2' sub in the door.

Otherwise it'll be too hard to maneuver a 130 lb 2' sub in and out.

Here are some original vs new concept renders. I think I'm liking the cleaner look anyways.

Original with Chair Rail on Front Columns


New Concept without Chair Rail and Larger Cabinet Door



Original with Chair Rail on Front Columns


New Concept without Chair Rail and Larger Cabinet Door
post #1217 of 3008
I like the chair rail, but hear you on your reasoning
post #1218 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

I like the chair rail, but hear you on your reasoning

Both ways look awesome to me...
post #1219 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

I like the chair rail, but hear you on your reasoning

I agree with Larry.
post #1220 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys for the feedback.

I might play with the idea of using a smaller moulding as an accent to separate the two speaker grills.

I'm out of my league trying to design a flush cabinet door since I've never done it. I may have to do a little online digging to find out tips and tricks. I'm also deciding whether to make the entire roughly 7' door swing open or just the bottom half.


To give my mind a break yesterday, I wanted to at least get something done that didn't require thinking. So I installed the 1/4" oak along the front of first row riser. Some areas are a little higher than the riser so I'll use a dremel to sand it flush.
post #1221 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I also placed an order for this Hi-tack flocked light trap material:
http://www.protostar.biz/hitack.htm

I plan to adhere it to the front wood work surrounding the screen. So the top of the front cabinets and the side walls.

This is supposed to be really black. It's typically used for telescopes. Other's on the forum seem to have raved about it as well.
post #1222 of 3008
Mcascio,

I am a noob to all of this, but have been following your thread. Could you go through your wiring? I see multiple wires coming out each hole out of the columns, front wall, and for the projector. Just trying to learn what they all are. Thanks
post #1223 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Hi cobra4v,

Welcome to the AVS. Exciting to know I encouraged your very first post here.

Here's an illustration of how I wired the room:
post #1224 of 3008
Thank you for posting that. Great thread. I will most likely have more questions in the future.
post #1225 of 3008
Mcascio,

Let me be the next person to compliment you on the awesome theather design you have. I am getting closer to actually starting my build and I hope you don't mind me borrowing from your thread. Keep the details coming!
post #1226 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I'm out of my league trying to design a flush cabinet door since I've never done it. I may have to do a little online digging to find out tips and tricks. I'm also deciding whether to make the entire roughly 7' door swing open or just the bottom half.

Building a 7' door that fits flush into an opening would be a challenge. How many 7' boards have you seen that are straight and flat? Smaller doors are much easier. If it were me, I would do each side as two doors (one on top and one on bottom).

When I have a project that uses inset doors, I usually build the doors a little oversize and then trim them to fit the opening. How you go about trimming the door to fit depends to an extent on what tools you have. One method is to make a template of the door out of strips of 1/8" plywood, hot-melt glued together. Lay the template on your oversized door and trace around it with a pencil, marking where you need to trim. Clamp a straight edge on the pencil line and use a flush-trim bit in your router to make the cut. You can get pretty good results this way if you take your time.
post #1227 of 3008
Why did you use 12/4 wire for front L&R and high, but then used 12/2 for the rest of the speakers? Also, how are you going to run all of the subs and shakers? Do you use a separate amp for all the subs then connect that to your receiver? thanks
post #1228 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by awilcox View Post

Mcascio,

Let me be the next person to compliment you on the awesome theather design you have. I am getting closer to actually starting my build and I hope you don't mind me borrowing from your thread. Keep the details coming!

Thanks awilcox. Feel free to borrow away. I'll continue to post as much detail as I can to hopefully save the next member some time.
post #1229 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp View Post


Building a 7' door that fits flush into an opening would be a challenge. How many 7' boards have you seen that are straight and flat? Smaller doors are much easier. If it were me, I would do each side as two doors (one on top and one on bottom).

When I have a project that uses inset doors, I usually build the doors a little oversize and then trim them to fit the opening. How you go about trimming the door to fit depends to an extent on what tools you have. One method is to make a template of the door out of strips of 1/8" plywood, hot-melt glued together. Lay the template on your oversized door and trace around it with a pencil, marking where you need to trim. Clamp a straight edge on the pencil line and use a flush-trim bit in your router to make the cut. You can get pretty good results this way if you take your time.

Great info. I thought the 7' door would be more challenging. Thanks to this thread I did buy a flush trim bit. I've found myself using it quite a bit for various things. Awesome tool!
post #1230 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobra4v View Post

Why did you use 12/4 wire for front L&R and high, but then used 12/2 for the rest of the speakers? Also, how are you going to run all of the subs and shakers? Do you use a separate amp for all the subs then connect that to your receiver? thanks

It was easier to pull a 12/4 to the same location. 2 pair can go to the front and the other 2 pair can go to the front high. Make sense?
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