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The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread - Page 47

post #1381 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedTopDown View Post

It will come together for sure. I remember picking up 40 pieces of 16' molding and thinking, "Holy Crap!" I think you've seen my crazy side walls and the multiple layers of trim. So I feel for you on all the ins-and-outs to come. I think you have the same miter saw as I do, which was a God-send in the end. My old single-tilt, non-slide Dewalt would have never cut it (no pun intended).

It is amazing to see it when it's all up though.

Yeah the Dewalt double compound sliding miter saw is bauce

I took this piece of crap


to this


Picture is terrible but it came out pretty awesome for my first job. There is tons of detail in that I never uploaded the close ups photos but it came out great and I am very happy. I think I used something like 17 different pieces of trim

Sorry to hi jack Mario
post #1382 of 3008
GREAT WORK mcascio. The pictorial is SUPERB !!!! As a woodwork hobbyist, I'm really enjoying your build. Keep the pics coming........... Bravo Dude.
post #1383 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I noticed after completion there's still a little skewing to the large cabinet door. Is there anyway to retrain the door if I compress it for a few days or will it always return? My thought was to use a top magnet to pull it in flush with the frame. The moulding will hopefully have a positive effect on the doors when I glue them on.

The only "fix" I know of would involve cutting the door apart. If you know which part of the frame is causing the problem, you could cut it out and insert a new piece.

If the high corner of the door isn't sticking out too much, you might very well be able to pull it in with a magnet.

You might also think about whether you really need to worry about this, especially if the defect is not very big. All-black cabinets and black shadow lines could let the eye slide right past without the brain really registering a defect.
post #1384 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by btinindy View Post

I had the same problem with a 96" door that I built. After cutting, and painting it it developed a warp of about 1/2"/foot. Luckily the concave portion was on the inside. I used my circular saw set very shallow and made kerf cuts about a quarter inch apart. I then filled theses kerfs with epoxy and sandwiched the door with wax paper and one side on my bench and the other with a dead flat piece of plywood and added weight to cure. Since I painted ht doors it was easy to conceal, but it did fix the warp. We will see when the humid summer comes if it has any signs again.

Mine isn't that bad. I think if I just put a magnet at the top of the cabinet I can just push it towards it. Stil waiting for delivery of those. That's a pretty neat technique though.
post #1385 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

Yeah the Dewalt double compound sliding miter saw is bauce

I took this piece of crap


to this


Picture is terrible but it came out pretty awesome for my first job. There is tons of detail in that I never uploaded the close ups photos but it came out great and I am very happy. I think I used something like 17 different pieces of trim

Sorry to hi jack Mario

Larry,

Nice work. A lot of detail in that mantle! I'm looking forward to your build.
post #1386 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nosdude View Post

GREAT WORK mcascio. The pictorial is SUPERB !!!! As a woodwork hobbyist, I'm really enjoying your build. Keep the pics coming........... Bravo Dude.

Thamks for the compliments nosdude. I'll definitely keep the pics coming.
post #1387 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp View Post

The only "fix" I know of would involve cutting the door apart. If you know which part of the frame is causing the problem, you could cut it out and insert a new piece.

If the high corner of the door isn't sticking out too much, you might very well be able to pull it in with a magnet.

You might also think about whether you really need to worry about this, especially if the defect is not very big. All-black cabinets and black shadow lines could let the eye slide right past without the brain really registering a defect.

I have a tendency to over think things. I think the magnets going to work...plus like you said, once everything is painted black...even shadow lines start to disappear.

I was having a heck of time finding any maple that didn't have some bowing to it (aside from other issues like cupping and warping). So working with what I had, I thought I would counter the bowing with another adjoining board.

So I found the natural bowing of the board and placed the perpendicular adjoing board with the bowing in the other direction. Hoping the two would counter-act each other and meet somewhere in the middle. That seemed to give me good results on the second large door I built.

Here's an illustration that will hopefully make some sense. This may be common knowledge or maybe I just got lucky, but I did have good results.
post #1388 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Here's a shot of the right front corner cabinet door installed. Bottom is built but just waiting on hinges.


I also cut the lower wall MDF by the steps. A little tricky with all the steps to workaournd but it turned out good. Does anyone know if it's critical for me to leave a half inch gap where it will meet with carpeting? I still am going to put up baseboard.





I just need to finish the lower mdf wall next to the front stage and then I can make final cuts on the bull nose and stair tread before attaching.
post #1389 of 3008
I wouldn't worry about the gap with the MDF since you are going to put up baseboard. Leaving a 3/8" gap to tuck the carpeting is standard. 1/4" is usually too tight and 1/2" will still leave a gap and appear loose.

Theater is looking great and you are making fantastic progress. I feel so lazy when I read your thread!
post #1390 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

I wouldn't worry about the gap with the MDF since you are going to put up baseboard. Leaving a 3/8" gap to tuck the carpeting is standard. 1/4" is usually too tight and 1/2" will still leave a gap and appear loose.

Theater is looking great and you are making fantastic progress. I feel so lazy when I read your thread!

Thanks. I won't worry about making it perfect then.
post #1391 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I finished cutting the MDF for the lower front walls. If I'm right, I may only need to rip one more sheet of MDF down for the rear of the room. Woohoo!

I also started removing the cabinet doors and sanding and routing the edges with a 1/8" round over bit. Then I applied some base cap moulding that I'm using throughout the room before running out of moulding.





post #1392 of 3008
Mario,

Your build is awesome and it has been a real treat following your progress along the way. Your theater is coming together nicely and the rest of your basement rocks. We all appreciate the time you take to post photos while recording your progress step-by-step; clearly, the AVS community benefits at large. So, thank you for your time. Now, can you slow down a bit so we can keep up with your posts
post #1393 of 3008
Seeing your woodworking skills I am surprised you didn't try tackling the bar cabinets. I'm contemplating building my own bar cabinets once the theater is done but we'll see what my confidence level is at that time.
post #1394 of 3008
Mario - props on the wood working to date. It will be worth it and will look great.
post #1395 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ModestHT View Post

Mario,

Your build is awesome and it has been a real treat following your progress along the way. Your theater is coming together nicely and the rest of your basement rocks. We all appreciate the time you take to post photos while recording your progress step-by-step; clearly, the AVS community benefits at large. So, thank you for your time. Now, can you slow down a bit so we can keep up with your posts

Thanks very much. I'm glad it's of use to others. I even find myself searching my own thread for answers to questions I may have asked months ago.
post #1396 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

Seeing your woodworking skills I am surprised you didn't try tackling the bar cabinets. I'm contemplating building my own bar cabinets once the theater is done but we'll see what my confidence level is at that time.

Hi Larry. I really didn't start doing anything in the theater or basement that was "out of my comfort zone" until the bar was almost complete. I ended up buying the Porter Cable brad nailer package because I knew I could use it to do the fabric frames in the theater. I bought it earlier since I thought I would try tackling putting up some of the moulding around the bar myself. This led me to trying some other things such as the theater columns, which led me to doing more and more construction. I was actually trying to find someone to do the bull nose and stair treads but my old neighbor had surgery. So I decided I'd give it a try.

Even knowing what I know now, I don't think I would tackle doing the bar cabinets. I think I would need more tools to do a "finished" cabinet like the ones I have in my bar. Just getting straight wood was a challenge and time consuming. I probably should have checked out the stock at a lumber yard to see if the quality was any better, but the closest one I know of is a good 45 minutes away. I would have had to deal with finishing the insides, staining, sliding drawers, pull out bins, etc. If I was retired and had plenty of time and room to put all the equipment I'd need...maybe.

I definitely could have used the money I put into the cabinets to purchase the equipment and do it myself, but chances are I'd still be working on the bar right now instead of the theater.
post #1397 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by misugrad View Post

Mario - props on the wood working to date. It will be worth it and will look great.

Thanks Mike!
post #1398 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I experienced a lull due to being sick and jambing my finger.

I managed to finish all the mouldings on the front cabinets. I also finished adding the 3/4" mdf supports in the front center cabinet. I can now sit or stand on it without worry. The temporary 4x4 supports have now been removed.

I also mounted all the magnetic touch latches.

I ran into a bit of a snag where ther chair rail I was planning on wasn't in stock at the lumber yard. I'm hoping they'll be restocking since I centered everything around the 3" chair rail. Going to a 2 5/8" will get me off center a bit.

Here are the photos from the progress.

















post #1399 of 3008
Absolutely incredible!! AMAZING craftsmanship! Congrats on an amazing build!!
Any chance you have a link to a full photo gallery of the build?
post #1400 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FRCan View Post

Absolutely incredible!! AMAZING craftsmanship! Congrats on an amazing build!!
Any chance you have a link to a full photo gallery of the build?

Hi FRCan. Thanks for reserving your first post for this thread

I appreciate your kind words.

I do not have any other full photo gallery...although this thread is pretty comprehensive if you look back.
post #1401 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post


You know its funny because I wanted to build a screen wall similiar to what you're almost complete with but never thought I could...but following you step by step I think I am going to give it a shot

Great work!
post #1402 of 3008
I know you haven't mounted the screen yet, but do you have any tricks up your sleeve for giving you the ability to take the screen on and off?
post #1403 of 3008
I read page 1 to see all the renderings of the theater and the last page to see where you've come and I just wanted to say that your theater's plans are absolutely stunning... one of the nicest I have ever seen, and that your craftsmanship seems top notch!

I wish you continued good luck on this monster project!
post #1404 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

You know its funny because I wanted to build a screen wall similiar to what you're almost complete with but never thought I could...but following you step by step I think I am going to give it a shot

Great work!

Larry,

It's really not that bad once you break it down into smaller tasks. You get a lot of practice along the way. Starting with the columns was a good primer.
post #1405 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

I know you haven't mounted the screen yet, but do you have any tricks up your sleeve for giving you the ability to take the screen on and off?

I'm still not sure yet. I haven't done much research or given too much thought to it. My first idea though is to mount a board on a piano hinge. Then mount the screen to that board.

I'm open to other suggestions.


I still need to figure out how I'm going to mount the speakers behind the screen as well.
post #1406 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveklein View Post

I read page 1 to see all the renderings of the theater and the last page to see where you've come and I just wanted to say that your theater's plans are absolutely stunning... one of the nicest I have ever seen, and that your craftsmanship seems top notch!

I wish you continued good luck on this monster project!

Thanks so much. It finally feels like I'm turning the corner and finish line in sight.
post #1407 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Big,

I saw in another thread that you had pointed to the Cut-N-Crown system for doing Crown moulding. Is that what you use on all your projects?

http://www.cutncrown.com/all_products.php

It seems like it would be quicker and accurate than some of the other options and much less work than coping.
post #1408 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Paint questions.

So I need to dig back into the paint questions again.

I'm planning on doing Benjamin Moore F215 80 Flat black on the ceiling. But any recommendations for the trim, columns, maple cabinetry and oak steps/bullnose?

Does anyone know if BM has a matching black that isn't Flat? I'm assuming I'd want a satin on everything else?
post #1409 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Paint questions.

So I need to dig back into the paint questions again.

I'm planning on doing Benjamin Moore F215 80 Flat black on the ceiling. But any recommendations for the trim, columns, maple cabinetry and oak steps/bullnose?

Does anyone know if BM has a matching black that isn't Flat? I'm assuming I'd want a satin on everything else?

Well since you brought it up. Benjamin Moore F215 80 Flat Black is BM's Canada's line of paint under the Collection name. A similar paint would be what you might find in your local store as Regal N215. Below are some codes that might help you look in the store

Regal Flat Finish = N215
Regal Primer = N216
Regal Matte Finish = N221
Regal Pearl Finish = N310
Regal Eggshell Finish = N319
Regal Semi-Gloss Finish = N333

The Satin sheen you mentioned above is between Pearl and Semi-Gloss; looking at my sheen chart it is closer to Pearl.

If you decide you want to try Regal Select which has a lower VOC than Regal as well as a few other attributes here are the product #s

Regal Select Flat Finish = 547
Regal Select Matte Finish = 548
Regal Select Eggshell Finish = 549
Regal Select Pearl Finish = 550
Regal Select Semi-Gloss Finish = 551

post #1410 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Paint questions.

So I need to dig back into the paint questions again.

I'm planning on doing Benjamin Moore F215 80 Flat black on the ceiling. But any recommendations for the trim, columns, maple cabinetry and oak steps/bullnose?

Does anyone know if BM has a matching black that isn't Flat? I'm assuming I'd want a satin on everything else?

Are you wanting to use paint, stain or a combination of both? The MDF would obviously be painted, but do you want the front cabinetry / moldings to have the same finished look or to highlight the real wood grain by using a black stain? If you want the absolute best, most consistent finish then I would hire it out to a professional who will spray the cabinetry in place with an enamel primer and finish coat in whatever color and gloss you would like. This is how any high-end custom built-ins are finished.

But if you want to do it yourself (which I definitely don't blame you with all of the hard work you put into the cabinetry), then I would probably stain all the wood details and paint the engineered wood products (such as the MDF). Minwax makes a very nice line of wipe-on products with built-in poly coating in the satin finish you are looking for.

Two words of caution - first, staining will take MUCH longer than simply painting everything. Second, different woods will take stain differently, so use test pieces to experiment with different grits of sandpaper and different lengths of time in letting the stain sit before wiping off. As a novice woodworker I personally found this part the biggest PITA. Hopefully there are some more knowledgeable woodworking folks here on the forum who can add their input to this step.

Theater is looking great! Doesn't seem like you are too far off from carpet, screen and electronics.
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