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The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread - Page 87

post #2581 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

1. Yeah - I went through all this trouble of trying to add supports to the bar...must have made half a dozen trips to a variety of stores and hours trying to hide them in the design. Then the counter guy shows up and says I don't even need them. smile.gif So I took them out.

That's what I'm trying to figure out. In trying to determine the maximum amount of allowable overhang, according to the Marble Institute of America you can safely overhang granite that is 3cm thick up to 10" without supports. However, the cantilevered portion cannot be more than 1/3 the total width of the countertop.

Hmmm. I might just continue with a design similar to yours, with the fallback that I could add some of those "mini" supports if the counter installer insists on it.

Thanks again, Mario.
post #2582 of 3008
What color red is the wall color?
post #2583 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynfan View Post

Mario,
How much space do you have behind that for the 703? I have some good ideas to create a trap the provides good results and if you want to share Height, Width, and Depth dimensions I can tell you what I am thinking.

I used a similar space to do an Ethan Winer design bass trap that works quite well that doubles as the back of my equipment rack.

Hey Wes,

I have roughly a 3" depth, by 31" wide by 48" tall behind all the wiring.

Are you thinking of using a thin 1/4" board, oc703 and then an air gap?

The challenge would be that unless I want to pull everything out, I may need to assemble it in sections behind the rack. I'll have to see how much work it would be though.

Maybe we can get together next week sometime. I've got a pretty full weekend though.
Edited by mcascio - 1/11/13 at 3:38pm
post #2584 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roknrol View Post

That's what I'm trying to figure out. In trying to determine the maximum amount of allowable overhang, according to the Marble Institute of America you can safely overhang granite that is 3cm thick up to 10" without supports. However, the cantilevered portion cannot be more than 1/3 the total width of the countertop.

Hmmm. I might just continue with a design similar to yours, with the fallback that I could add some of those "mini" supports if the counter installer insists on it.

Thanks again, Mario.

I think that's the information I was using but it's been a while. I remember the 1/3 rule though.

I think by me adding the extra 2x4's to create that lip, it bought me that extra 3" plus the 3/4" plywood face. The one thing I would have done differently though is put a more polished looking black backer board that the cabinet doors on the face sit on. While there isn't much showing, I should have at least sanded the face of it smooth. You can see the roughness during the day. At night, it's no biggie though.
post #2585 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattymelt3605 View Post

What color red is the wall color?

The red is FR701 GOM Fabric - Claret Accent.
post #2586 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Hey Wes,

I have roughly a 3" depth, by 31" wide by 48" tall behind all the wiring.

Are you thinking of using a thin 1/4" board, oc703 and then an air gap?

The challenge would be that unless I want to pull everything out, I may need to assemble it in sections behind the rack. I'll have to see how much work it would be though.

Maybe we can get together next week sometime. I've got a pretty full weekend though.

Thats the thought. The only issue is with that design I believe they call for the inside to be sealed. If not then you could do 2" OC703 with a 1" airgap.

I have a flexible schedule from a work perspective so I can move things around myself.

I will be working on my room this weekend myself...
post #2587 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post


They are friction fit at this point but I still need to brad nail them to suck them into the wall in places where the wood is bowed. It was challenging to get the large one out after it went in. I had to use a putty knife.

Hey Mario, I'm going through the part of your build when you were doing your fabric frames. I'm still a little way off from doing my frames but it won't be too long. I have two that will need to be removeable which I'm going to try and friction fit with velcro to help hold them (If that doesn't work I'm going to try ball and socket speaker grill parts).

Anyway for the rest I wasn't sure what to do and I noticed in the quote above you brad nailed yours. Do you see any holes from the nails or do they appear to be minor? I assume you nailed through the GOM and frame into the drywall?
post #2588 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynfan View Post

Thats the thought. The only issue is with that design I believe they call for the inside to be sealed. If not then you could do 2" OC703 with a 1" airgap.

I have a flexible schedule from a work perspective so I can move things around myself.

I will be working on my room this weekend myself...

Cool. I've been slammed this week but may try to get ahold of you before it's over if I can.

I'd have to come up with a way to air seal it if that's required.
post #2589 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by design1stcode2nd View Post

Hey Mario, I'm going through the part of your build when you were doing your fabric frames. I'm still a little way off from doing my frames but it won't be too long. I have two that will need to be removeable which I'm going to try and friction fit with velcro to help hold them (If that doesn't work I'm going to try ball and socket speaker grill parts).

Anyway for the rest I wasn't sure what to do and I noticed in the quote above you brad nailed yours. Do you see any holes from the nails or do they appear to be minor? I assume you nailed through the GOM and frame into the drywall?

I ended up not doing any brad nails to attach the frames..

I did use velcro in some places where needed. Mostly at the tops. I found rather than putting the velcro on the wall (my first attempt), it worked better by cutting a 3/4" strip x 2" long and putting it on the columns. So it grabbed the sides of the frame and keeps them from pulling out, rather than trying to grab the back of the frame.
post #2590 of 3008
So you don't get any bowing out in the middle of your frames where it connects to the crown or chair rail only? Mine should fully rest on my wainscot which ends up being 1-1/8" thick. Planning on having my frames be 1-1/4" so the Linacoustic can be just a bit off the fabric.
post #2591 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by design1stcode2nd View Post

So you don't get any bowing out in the middle of your frames where it connects to the crown or chair rail only? Mine should fully rest on my wainscot which ends up being 1-1/8" thick. Planning on having my frames be 1-1/4" so the Linacoustic can be just a bit off the fabric.

I was pretty thorough when I picked through the lumber to find the straightest I could. And I used the "select" wood. There were still some scenarios where it seemed the top would push out just a little. I didn't see any problems on the sides or bottom after a quick pass through the room. (been a while).
So I only really needed the velcro on the tops of mostly the larger pieces or wherever I noticed it pulling off the wall. It most likely happened there since it was a little tighter on the sides and the top was where there would be a little more space since gravity kicked in.

I think you'll be OK without the brad nails if you do it like mine.

I remember going through all sorts of strategies on the frames. The only downside of my install was that I have to remove some of the moulding on the sides of one column in order to take the frames out in some areas.
post #2592 of 3008
Well I’ll go with friction fit and see where the trouble is and add Velcro as needed. I am going for one 9’x4’ panel (it will have 2-3 support members) so that will be the tough one, the rest are closer to 4.5’x3.5’.
post #2593 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by design1stcode2nd View Post

Well I’ll go with friction fit and see where the trouble is and add Velcro as needed. I am going for one 9’x4’ panel (it will have 2-3 support members) so that will be the tough one, the rest are closer to 4.5’x3.5’.

Sounds good. That is one large fabric panel. 3 supporting members might help to keep it straight over time too. The other obstacle is the walls...they can move in/out too. smile.gif
post #2594 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I needed an easy way to charge, store and keep safe all the 3D glasses at once.

So I used a rackmount cable management D-ring from Monoprice. I had plenty of space left over in my Patch Panel cabinet in the theater so it worked out great.

I used this 10 port USB hub and a power supply.
IMG_2160_small.jpg

Just an update for others that are considering this 10 port USB hub.

I haven't been able to charge my Harmony and PS3 remote using it. It does work for the 3D glasses though.

I guess I may need something with a little more power?
post #2595 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I woke up at 5am to the pleasant sound of our sump pump alarm going off.

Turns out that a piece of hardened spray foam had fallen into the sump tank and lodged it's way underneath the float so it couldn't go all the way to the top and turn on the main sump.

I have the alarm set to go off when the first sump fails...which was a good thing. I immediately mannually tripped the 2nd backup sump - but that wasn't pumping water out either. I had just layed down some black plastic flexible sump hose and layed it on the ground outside extending it past the house...but apparently it was clogged or frozen. Which is odd since that sump never runs.

My plan was to route some PVC underground next year to hide the pipe, but it would be a bigger pain if it's frozen underground rather than above. What's the recommended approach? I need to route it about 30 feet away from the house.

The 2nd sump outlet sits about 2' above the ground. So one theory is just to use a stiff PVC pipe and keep it angled to prevent any sitting water. But this would keep it above ground and kind of an eye sore.

All in all, I was happy to have avoided potentially flooding the theater.
post #2596 of 3008
Yikes! That would NOT be good. My sump pvc line exits the side of the house about 2' above ground, takes an immediate down turn and goes underground. It then connects to a 3" drain tile that runs under our driveway and connects directly to the storm sewer. Meets code for new construction around here. Happily, it hasn't run yet, and was bone dry last time I checked it. My last house had water issues, so when we built, I made sure the contractors did everything possible to avoid any water issues. 3 years, and so far so good (knocking on giant piles of wood right now).
post #2597 of 3008
Always good to know those rarely used alarm systems work. I also have 2 pumps and a sensor in my pit. My main pump goes outside to a buried pipe with a continuous slope but that pipe somehow got crushed underground. I left the underground pipe and now have a flex above ground that I only use in the spring/summer months. In the winter months I remove the flex and unplug the main pump. This allows the 2nd pump to now kick in during the winter (float set higher than main pump) months. My floor drain is right next to my sump pit so I ran a short piece of rigid ABS from my secondary pump directly to the drain for use during the winter. Having both pumps plugged in during the summer allows my secondary pump to kick in if the primary ever fails.
post #2598 of 3008
My sump is covered for Radon but I am going to pick up a couple of those leak alert alarms you listed a while back Mario. That would have helped when my basement flooded during Sandy.

Now every time it rains and I hear the sump under my addition run I'm off to the basement with a flashlight looking for leaks; it has me paranoid now.
post #2599 of 3008
About 3 years after we moved in to our house I woke up to find an inch of water covering our entire basement. Luckily it was unfinished at the time and easy to clean up but after that vowed to never let that happen again so I feel your "fear". On the outside of our house I routed the discharge to a T fitting with a ballcock valve. The end of the T is capped and with the valve open it feeds the bottom of the Tee and that terminates just at ground level in to a 4" PVC pipe that I buried and routes away from the house. I did not hard pipe it all the way for the reasons you mentioned with freezing and back up. SO if something does happen it just bubbles back up and out of the pipe in the ground and runs over the lawn at a slow state. If there is a sever issue I just close the valve and remove the cap and I have an alternative outlet that can just spew out or I can run a piece of black tile off of it in a pinch.

It was a cheap yet effective way to not have any discharge issues! I DID initially bury corrugated drain tile and that froze and clogged and I re-did it with smooth walled PVC.

I just realized my description sucks so I will snap a pic. and share it...

Here it is in all of it's winter ugliness!


Edited by dynfan - 1/19/13 at 9:48am
post #2600 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynfan View Post

About 3 years after we moved in to our house I woke up to find an inch of water covering our entire basement. Luckily it was unfinished at the time and easy to clean up but after that vowed to never let that happen again so I feel your "fear". On the outside of our house I routed the discharge to a T fitting with a ballcock valve. The end of the T is capped and with the valve open it feeds the bottom of the Tee and that terminates just at ground level in to a 4" PVC pipe that I buried and routes away from the house. I did not hard pipe it all the way for the reasons you mentioned with freezing and back up. SO if something does happen it just bubbles back up and out of the pipe in the ground and runs over the lawn at a slow state. If there is a sever issue I just close the valve and remove the cap and I have an alternative outlet that can just spew out or I can run a piece of black tile off of it in a pinch.

It was a cheap yet effective way to not have any discharge issues! I DID initially bury corrugated drain tile and that froze and clogged and I re-did it with smooth walled PVC.

I just realized my description sucks so I will snap a pic. and share it...

Here it is in all of it's winter ugliness!


Hey Wes,

Yeah - I've been in similar situations. I think in our sunken part of the theater before we even started on it, we had about 6" of water in there. So I know it will flood and that's why I'm taking so many measures to prevent it again now that the theater is done.

Thanks for the information and especially the photo. I like your idea of not completely closing the connection and having the blow-out option with the T.

How deep did you go with your 4" that's sitting below the ground? Is that a 4" Elbow right at the top of the dirt?

I'll have to do some testing, but I would think if I put a 45 degree elbow right there that the force of the sump pump pushing it out so fast may end up spraying a lot of it back up. But I'm not positive on that one.

I may just come up with a temporary solution for now....just letting the water on the back up sump push out and remove any extra attachments that can freeze. That's better than having the backup sump plugged up.
Then when summer rolls around tackle the 30' of trenching out a 4" pipe.
post #2601 of 3008
This is how I did mine:

IMG_1596.JPG

Tim
post #2602 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by W00lly View Post

Thank goodness for the alarm. I myself dont get alot of water in my sump pits but think I will look into a alarm and battery back up for my sump.

Mario can you post what Alarm your using

I'd definitely look into at least an inexpensive battery alarm. For the few bucks they could really save you in an extreme case.
Here's the one's I bought and placed around the house:
http://www.smarthome.com/71631/Smarthome-MT400-Water-Leak-Detection-Alarm/p.aspx

Ideally it would be just a bit smaller. I found it just a wee bit big to be completely hidden behind our toilets.

For the sump pit, I'm using these Sump Pump Alarm Bobbers:
http://www.absoluteautomation.com/sump-pump-alarm-high-water-switch/

These are then wired back into my Elk Security panel.

I have one that sits at the level of when the main sump pump is triggered. This one is strictly used as a counter for my own purposes. Since you don't always hear the sump running, I just wanted to calculate how often it does. So the Elk then triggers a Macro in MLserver to add 1 each time it gets triggered. I reset the counter at Midnight each day, and then store the total for that day in another variable. From any touch screen I can see where the counter is at.

I then have another one tied to just above the main sump pump...so as soon as it rises above...meaning the main sump didn't trigger or isn't working, it will sound the alarm. I just added this week for it also to send me an email through MLServer. So if I'm out and about, I can take necessary steps to get back or have someone check it out for me.

There's also one of these Sump Pump Alarm Bobbers in my ejection pit for the sewer. That would be an even worse problem when that pump fails!


These pumps do fail or just the switch fails on them. I think I've gone through two already in 10 years. Better safe than sorry.
post #2603 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Tim View Post

This is how I did mine:

IMG_1596.JPG

Tim

Thanks for posting Tim. Another great example.
post #2604 of 3008
One more example:



Due to the size of our basement, we have two sump pits. Each pit has a primary pump, a backup pump, and an additional battery powered pump in case of power outage.

They all pump out through these discharge lines with IceGuard protection.
post #2605 of 3008
Mario,
I have a 4" 90 right there and get almost zero splash out. In the warm months I have a stainless screen that I install in the 4" pipe and it keeps too much debris from lodging in the pipe, I remove it for the winter months so it doesn't freeze. My setup works well and was inexpensive. My PVC is maybe 6-8" below the surface and increases in depth as it slopes away from the house. Been that way for about 4 years now and no problems. Not the prettiest during the winter but I clean it up in spring and will repaint the PVC to match the house.
post #2606 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jchasen View Post

One more example:



Due to the size of our basement, we have two sump pits. Each pit has a primary pump, a backup pump, and an additional battery powered pump in case of power outage.

They all pump out through these discharge lines with IceGuard protection.

Thanks jchasen.

It's to tell, but do those cone shaped PVC's that you have pictured allow the water to flow out of the vents in case it did freeze?
post #2607 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynfan View Post

Mario,
I have a 4" 90 right there and get almost zero splash out. In the warm months I have a stainless screen that I install in the 4" pipe and it keeps too much debris from lodging in the pipe, I remove it for the winter months so it doesn't freeze. My setup works well and was inexpensive. My PVC is maybe 6-8" below the surface and increases in depth as it slopes away from the house. Been that way for about 4 years now and no problems. Not the prettiest during the winter but I clean it up in spring and will repaint the PVC to match the house.


Thanks Wes.

That's good to know. I'll probably adopt something very similar to yours. I may add a cover that can freely slide up and down the 1 1/2" PVC to cover the 4". That way I can avoid the screen and still have an overflow option.
post #2608 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I picked up the Darbee Darblet DVP 5000 a couple weeks ago. I wanted to play around with it a bit before giving some thoughts on it.

I must say, it does a great job of adding sharpness to the projected image on my Panasonic AE8000U that I hadn't seen before. You can see this especially with things like hair, the strands become much more visible and defined.

It also appears to affect the contrast of images. This is especially true with the animated movies out there. They really seem to pop now. The ability to dial it in is also nice.

The only downside I've really seen is that you want to play around with it before each movie to see which settings work the best.

I'm definitely keeping the Darbee Darblet and making it a permanent link in the chain.

Just curious if anyone else around here is using a Darbee Darblet and what their impressions were.

I was going to post some screenshots, but the DarbeeVision website does a much better job and has lots of images that you can see how it affects the images.

I also watched Polar Express in 3D with my daughter. I finally got around to getting my PS3 hooked up into the D-Box too. So we were able to experience 3D plus the motion platform. It really brought us into the movie. The only thing we were missing was smellavision.
Edited by mcascio - 1/21/13 at 12:04pm
post #2609 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jchasen View Post

One more example:



Due to the size of our basement, we have two sump pits. Each pit has a primary pump, a backup pump, and an additional battery powered pump in case of power outage.

They all pump out through these discharge lines with IceGuard protection.

Thanks jchasen.

It's to tell, but do those cone shaped PVC's that you have pictured allow the water to flow out of the vents in case it did freeze?

Yes, the water can flow out the vents in case the pipes freeze.
It doesn't show well in the picture since the part of the pipe closest to the house foundation is solid (so the water splashing out won't be directed at the house).

It works like this:

post #2610 of 3008
I also had the Darbee on my radar, good to know there's another +1 for it. Here are my 2 cent N.O. water alarm sensors. I have these in various places (under dishwasher, jacuzzi, hanging in sump pit....etc) around the house all hooked up to a single zone on my HAI alarm panel. I find using an aspirin holds up nicely but also dissolves quickly when in the presence of water. The 2 cables are held in place with thumb tacks.

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