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The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread - Page 24

post #691 of 3008
Everything looks awesome as usual
post #692 of 3008
Thread Starter 
So my Panasonic AE-4000u has been sitting in a box for over 2 years now. The AE-7000u just came out. Decisions. I'm thinking I may just run with the AE-4000u since I'll take probably the same hit on it whether it is barely open or has <200 hours on it. I haven't read enough about the AE-7000u though to know if there's a big enough difference. I'm not a huge 3D fan.

My one thought though is moving to a curved screen. I'm just not knowledgable enough in this area. Would I just need an anamorphic lens added to the Panasonic projector in order to do this?
post #693 of 3008
Beautiful!
post #694 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

My one thought though is moving to a curved screen. I'm just not knowledgeable enough in this area. Would I just need an anamorphic lens added to the Panasonic projector in order to do this?

The major functional reason for the curve is to correct the pincushion distortion created by the lens. The curve creates its own barrel distortion, which when figured properly compensates for the pincushion (as they are opposite), resulting in a geometrically correct image.

At least in a perfect world, if you want a curved screen you'll want to choose a lens (and a support or slide for it), determine the pincushion distortion it will generate at your throw and zoom, then determine the curve radius needed to correct that; then you can build it - or maybe find the size and curve you want from a screen manufacturer.

The other thing that goes along with this is "What do you do when you're watching material that doesn't require a lens?" If you project it without the lens, the barrel distortion of the curved screen is unmitigated (because there is no lens) and your HDTV image doesn't reach the corners of the screen. Or, you can apply some kind of digital squeeze, either in your projector or in a video processor/scaler (the "opposite" of the digital manipulation applied to 235 content) and leave the lens in place, so the offsetting geometrical distortions are maintained. To some extent, this explanation seems to overstate the problem. Especially at longer throws, the distortions can be subtle.

By my figuring, it's a lot of extra cost and complexity; but, the look of a curved screen is unmatched with the lights on.

Fred
post #695 of 3008
You are doing some awesome work there! Keep it up.
post #696 of 3008
Excellent and informative explanation Fred!

Mario - I thought a lot about the curved screen as well. I think the determining factor is the throw. If your throw is on the longer side, it's most likely not necessary. Other factors are that it's an expensive option (assuming you're not planning to DIY it) and as Fred said, it can complicate the setup (at least for a novice like me). However, there is no denying the cool-factor of walking into a room with a big fat curved screen.

So to sum up, please do it because I'd really like to see someone put a big honkin' curved screen into their setup. Have a good weekend.
post #697 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by filetandrelease View Post

Beautiful!

Well - thank you very much.
post #698 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

My one thought though is moving to a curved screen. I'm just not knowledgable enough in this area. Would I just need an anamorphic lens added to the Panasonic projector in order to do this?

Mario, having built and installed a curve screen I can give you my perspective. My TR is over 2 so my calculated curve was around a 43' radius. This isn't a massive curve but it is definitely sufficient to create a serious wow factor. The majority of the movies I have watched (and are likely to watch) are 2.35:1 therefore it made sense to me to go with a curve and to make this format completely distortion free. The only side effect is that when watching 16:9 material you get some barrel distortion as a result of the curve.

Building the screen was more complex than a flat screen would have been but I don't see the setup as being any more difficult.

You can see some examples of the distortion in my Prismasonic lens review. Note the barrel distortion on the 16:9 (non anamorphic pic) whilst the 2.4:1 is distortion free.

I have no doubt that I would have been perfectly happy with a flat screen since at my TR the distortion is not excessive and can be masked. As the TR decreases the value of a curved screen goes up.

All in all I'm happy I went curved but could have lived with a flat. I am however very happy I went with an a-lens vs. zooming -- the added brightness is enough value by itself.

Good luck.
post #699 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

The major functional reason for the curve is to correct the pincushion distortion created by the lens. The curve creates its own barrel distortion, which when figured properly compensates for the pincushion (as they are opposite), resulting in a geometrically correct image.

At least in a perfect world, if you want a curved screen you'll want to choose a lens (and a support or slide for it), determine the pincushion distortion it will generate at your throw and zoom, then determine the curve radius needed to correct that; then you can build it - or maybe find the size and curve you want from a screen manufacturer.

The other thing that goes along with this is "What do you do when you're watching material that doesn't require a lens?" If you project it without the lens, the barrel distortion of the curved screen is unmitigated (because there is no lens) and your HDTV image doesn't reach the corners of the screen. Or, you can apply some kind of digital squeeze, either in your projector or in a video processor/scaler (the "opposite" of the digital manipulation applied to 235 content) and leave the lens in place, so the offsetting geometrical distortions are maintained. To some extent, this explanation seems to overstate the problem. Especially at longer throws, the distortions can be subtle.

By my figuring, it's a lot of extra cost and complexity; but, the look of a curved screen is unmatched with the lights on.

Fred

Fred,

Very informative! I appreciate you taking the time to explain.
post #700 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys for chiming in. Based upon the feedback and the added costs of going to the curved screen/anamorphic lens...I think I'm going to run with my original plan of the flat screen.

I think the funds may be better spent in other areas of the theater like adding more subs or upgrading the projector.
post #701 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdika17 View Post

What other systems besides MK did you look at, any major reasons why your going with them?

If you had the chance to listen to them you'd understand why haha. I own a set of LCR M&K S-150s and they are the most accurate and neutral speakers I've ever heard. Voice reproduction is the most impressive part of these speakers. On certain movies, especially during monologues, it sounds as though the person's head was inside the speaker and talking out of it. I've never heard another speaker do this, though I've read (but never auditioned) the JTR Triple 8's have the same kind of clarity to them.
post #702 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seegs108 View Post

If you had the chance to listen to them you'd understand why haha. I own a set of LCR M&K S-150s and they are the most accurate and neutral speakers I've ever heard. Voice reproduction is the most impressive part of these speakers. On certain movies, especially during monologues, it sounds as though the person's head was inside the speaker and talking out of it. I've never heard another speaker do this, though I've read (but never auditioned) the JTR Triple 8's have the same kind of clarity to them.

It's amazing how well the M&K's have stood the test of time.
post #703 of 3008
Thread Starter 
The first layer of 3/4" OSB was liquid nailed and then screwed to the first row platform. A layer of roofing felt was stapled to the top and ready for the next layer of 3/4" OSB.




I added a little signage outside the rec room/bar bathroom.
post #704 of 3008
nice touch!
post #705 of 3008
Awesome build mcascio..... I can say without shame that I am envious of your whole basement!

Just curious here, but how were you intending on finishing the sheetrock edge (red arrow) on the bottom of the soffits?

I may have missed it somewhere, but I thought you were extending the sheetrock all the way to the edge and covering it with the 1x3 and crown molding...

post #706 of 3008
Thread Starter 
W00lly,

I know someone had posted a video of their DBox in action on the AVS somewhere if you look around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemer533 View Post

Awesome build mcascio..... I can say without shame that I am envious of your whole basement!

Just curious here, but how were you intending on finishing the sheetrock edge (red arrow) on the bottom of the soffits?

I may have missed it somewhere, but I thought you were extending the sheetrock all the way to the edge and covering it with the 1x3 and crown molding...


Very kind of you Beemer533. We just got the faucet, dishwasher and insinkerator all working yesterday. Nice to have running water right behind the bar. The carpenters are coming tonight to hopefully finish up most of the trim work on the bar and continue in the theater.

Regarding the soffit. I had the drywallers give it finished look using corner bead. That gives me the option of putting some small cove molding on it if I want or just leaving it as is.
post #707 of 3008
Thread Starter 
The 2nd layer of 3/4" OSB was added to the stage. Next steps...stairs!




The panels and stained cherry wood was added to the front of the bar. I just need to order some more cherry moldings and wait for delivery then the bar will officially be done. I also played around with some under counter lighting using LED rope lights.





post #708 of 3008
Can you show some pictures on how you did the rope light on the bar face? Looks great!
post #709 of 3008
Looking awesome Mario!
post #710 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by misterkit View Post

Can you show some pictures on how you did the rope light on the bar face? Looks great!

misterkit,

Might be easier/better to show you a profile illustration of how I made the front of the bar.



You'll notice I extended the front of the bar out using 2x4's that were painted black on the under side. A cherry stained board was used to hide the 2x4's and provide a 1 1/2" lip to hide the led light strip. I planned ahead and had an electrical outlet put into the other side of the walls inside of the cabinet. Then drilled through the back and pulled the cable out just below the 2x4's. The cable won't be visible once I color it black. I had them drill a 1" hole through the corner post so we could use one strip all the way from end to end. As of now, the led light strip is just taped up using electrical tape. I'll figure out something to permanently mount it. Then I'll be controlling it through my automation system.

Hope that helps.
post #711 of 3008
Looks great !
post #712 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post



Very kind of you Beemer533. We just got the faucet, dishwasher and insinkerator all working yesterday. Nice to have running water right behind the bar. The carpenters are coming tonight to hopefully finish up most of the trim work on the bar and continue in the theater.

Regarding the soffit. I had the drywallers give it finished look using corner bead. That gives me the option of putting some small cove molding on it if I want or just leaving it as is.


Nice, I just couldn't see that in the pictures... It defintely adds some interest to the soffit.
post #713 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Placed my order for the sound treatments on the front screen wall last night.

I plan on putting 2" OC703 wedges in the front wall corners for bass traps. I'll need to start them about 30" high to allow space for future subs.

Then the remaining front wall will be covered with two layers of 1" EcoShield liner (made from recycled denim). Not sure how I plan to attach it to the front wall. If anyone else has experience with this material I'm open to suggestions.
post #714 of 3008
Did you already order your OC703? I bought mine from a local place for pretty cheap.
post #715 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I did actually. Got mine from ATS Acoustics. Ordered it last night and it came this morning. They weren't too far from me.
post #716 of 3008
If you need more, or any other insulation, the place I bought mine from is just south of Jelly Belly in Pleasant Prairie. They have good prices.
post #717 of 3008
Thread Starter 
Wow. That is really close. Shoot me a PM with the company name and pricing you got it for if you wouldn't mind. I may end up needing one more batch.
post #718 of 3008
What is the going price for OC703 now?
post #719 of 3008
Thread Starter 
I paid $12.16 per 2' x 4' board with shipping from ATS Acoustics.

I went with the generic ATS Acoustics Rigid Fiberglass Board.
post #720 of 3008
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I paid $12.16 per 2' x 4' board with shipping from ATS Acoustics.

I went with the generic ATS Acoustics Rigid Fiberglass Board.

I went with the John Mansville brand and I paid $7.20 per 2x4 board, plus no shipping. I'll PM you the name and address of the place when I'm on my home computer.
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