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Zoom vs Lens and Projector Zoom Questions

post #1 of 127
Thread Starter 
I'm trying to decide between zooming vs using an anamorhic lens. I can't afford a good lens (maybe the DIY would be acceptable) and I will be using a motorized screen, so a curved screen is not an option. I am aware that the zooming method would not be using the full panel in non 16x9 images, therefore reducing resolution and brightness. I will be using a CIH of 49", therefore a 1.78 image would be 89" wide and a 2.35 image would be 115" wide. Eye to screen distance will be 13.5'.

ZOOMING
I read a review of the AE4000 on Projector Central and I pasted an excerpt from that review, below in bold. This projector has to two presets for 1.78 and 2.40.

Are there any projectors that offer more zoom and vertical lens shift presets than the AE4000?

A related question: why is the vertical lens shift needed when zooming (I assume the image shifts, but why)?

If you don't want to use an A-lens, but would rather use the zoom capabilities of the projector, the AE4000 has a powered zoom/focus with a Lens Memory feature that will automatically reset the lens and the vertical picture position for the display of either 2.40 movies or 16:9 material at the touch of a button. You can even set it to detect whether the material is 2.40 or 16:9 format, and have it automatically reconfigure the lens without even touching the button.

USING AN ANAMORPHIC LENS
A question realting to an anamorphic lens. As I can't use a curved screen, what would the best method be to eliminate, reduce or hide the pincushion distortion? Would zooming the image out so that the top and bottom center of the image would just meet the borders and causing the corners of the image to spill onto the black velvet masking work? Would the light spillage be sucked up by the masking? The only down side that I see is loosing a bit of picture at the corners. The screen would have to be a touch wider because of the zooming to hide the pincushioning.

If you have any other ideas or comments please let me know.

Thanks,
Greg
post #2 of 127
You lose no resolution when zooming. The black bars in material over 16:9 are hard encoded. An anamorphic lens will give you a little extra brightness but will also introduce aberrations of its own and will rob some light as it passes through the extra lenses.

The lens shifting is needed as projectors are setup to project from the bottom or top of the screen not the center. This is a mechanical not software adjustment like keystone so you're not degrading the picture as a result.

You will need some masking above and below the screen to hide the black bars since LCD/DLP etc projectors cannot do pure black. But once done you will not notice the black bars. I have a AE4000 and have masked off the area above the screen but not below yet. I can certainly see the light spill below but not above the screen.

The zoom on the AE4000 is sufficient for 99% of movies depending on your throw distance, worst case scenario would be very small black bars for something like Ben Hur @ 2.76:1
post #3 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post


A related question: why is the vertical lens shift needed when zooming (I assume the image shifts, but why)?

Most HT projectors have a biased lens system. This means that if the unit is table top mounted and you zoom, the image expands up and not equally up and down. Therefore as the image gets larger, the letterboxed image will shift up. You therefore need lens hsift to keep the letterboxed image in the same vertical position when zooming.


Quote:


USING AN ANAMORPHIC LENS
A question realting to an anamorphic lens. As I can't use a curved screen, what would the best method be to eliminate, reduce or hide the pincushion distortion? Would zooming the image out so that the top and bottom center of the image would just meet the borders and causing the corners of the image to spill onto the black velvet masking work? Would the light spillage be sucked up by the masking? The only down side that I see is loosing a bit of picture at the corners. The screen would have to be a touch wider because of the zooming to hide the pincushioning.

If you have any other ideas or comments please let me know.

Most lens users will apply a small amount of zoom to overscan the projected image onto the boarder of the screen. In most cases, this small amount of light spill is not visible.

















Thanks,
Greg[/quote]
post #4 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

I read a review of the AE4000 on Projector Central and I pasted an excerpt from that review, below in bold. This projector has to two presets for 1.78 and 2.40.

The AE4000 has 6 Lens Memory presets, however it will only switch automatically between two of them; you can manually select any of the 6 memory presets via the remote (albeit not directly).

I think you will be very happy with the PQ on a 115” scope screen. I’m running the AE4000 on a 122” wide Da-mat screen with a viewing distance of 14’ and it looks fantastic.

Also note that the AE4000 has both a manual and electronic lens (image) shift. The manual shift is a physical lens shift, moving the entire image up or down (or side to side) via dials located on the top of the projector (or bottom if inverted for ceiling mount) and has a large range of movement.

The electronic shift moves the 'image' within the LCD panel and will crop 16x9 images if moved up or down. The electronic shift is what is used in the lens memory presets and has “limited” up or down movement for 2.35 images.

You need to keep in mind that if you want the AE4000 to automatically switch between 16x9 and 2.35, you must have the projector positioned within the 16x9 screen area of your 2.35 screen.

If it is mounted higher (or lower for table top placement) than the active 16x9 screen area, you will have to use the manual vertical lens shift to align the image with your 2.35 screen when changing between 16x9 and 2.35 as the electronic vertical shift has insufficient range.

This is the case in my setup because I have my projector mounted tight to the ceiling and that puts the lens center about 5” above the top of my screen, hence my setup is not fully automatic when switching between 16x9 and scope. However, since my AE4000 is mounted on an 8’ ceiling and above my second row riser, it’s really no big deal to reach up and manually adjust the vertical lens shift when needed. YMMV.
post #5 of 127
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses........sounding good so far!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ziptiecowboy View Post

The AE4000 has 6 Lens Memory presets, however it will only switch automatically between two of them; you can manually select any of the 6 memory presets via the remote (albeit not directly).

So, what you are saying is that for say 1.85 or 1.33, etc. I could program the presets (both zoom and shift can be programmed), but I would first, through trial and error, determine what values need to be programmed in. Once this is done then I could just select that preset and it should set everything up for that particular AR. How difficult or time consuming is it to select these other presets......have to drill down a couple of layers in the remote to get to them?

Is this correct?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ziptiecowboy View Post

The electronic shift moves the 'image' within the LCD panel and will crop 16x9 images if moved up or down. The electronic shift is what is used in the lens memory presets and has limited up or down movement for 2.35 images.

You need to keep in mind that if you want the AE4000 to automatically switch between 16x9 and 2.35, you must have the projector positioned within the 16x9 screen area of your 2.35 screen.

If it is mounted higher (or lower for table top placement) than the active 16x9 screen area, you will have to use the manual vertical lens shift to align the image with your 2.35 screen when changing between 16x9 and 2.35 as the electronic vertical shift has insufficient range.

I just want to make sure that I understand what you are saying.

For the auto switching to work with the electronic image shift the lens must fall within the picture area of the 16x9 image............in other words for my case, the 16x9 image will be 49"x87" and the lens must be positioned within this rectangle.

Is this correct?

What if I program other AR's (using the remaining presets, which do not auto select), will the electronic image shift work with AR's, such as 1.85 and 1.33?

Thanks for the detailed answer to how the the AE4000 works.

Greg
post #6 of 127
The electronic shift will work with those other ARs (though likely that 1.33:1 will be the same settings as for 1.78:1, just with bigger side bars as it is the same height). The AE4000 is just memorising what zoom, focus and shift settings you have applied to get the image to fit the screen...nothing more. In other words it's no different, result wise, to manually adjusting all those controls on any other projector (assuming enough range of adjustment in the first place). It's just that with the AE4000 it is more convienient as this can be done automatically (for two memories) or buy selecting one of the six presets.

You are correct regarding the positioning of your 49" x 87" rectangle, otherwise you may well 'run out' of electronic shift when changing ARs.

I think that the AE3000/4000 marketing has caused much confusion with buyers thinking that the projector can do things it can't...it's simply a convienient way to zoom and nothing more (though that wouldn't sound as good in the marketing blurb of course ).
post #7 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVX View Post

Most HT projectors have a biased lens system. This means that if the unit is table top mounted and you zoom, the image expands up and not equally up and down. Therefore as the image gets larger, the letterboxed image will shift up. You therefore need lens hsift to keep the letterboxed image in the same vertical position when zooming.

Actually, if you can shelf mount the projector so that the lens is pointed directly at the screen instead of at an angle up or down, by positioning the projector using a combination of projector tilt with lens shift, you can set up the image so that you can easily zoom from 1.78:1 to 2.35:1 and back without having to touch the lens shift at all. I've been doing this for a couple of years now and all I ever need do now is adjust the zoom ring. It works beautifully.
post #8 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

So, what you are saying is that for say 1.85 or 1.33, etc. I could program the presets (both zoom and shift can be programmed), but I would first, through trial and error, determine what values need to be programmed in. Once this is done then I could just select that preset and it should set everything up for that particular AR. How difficult or time consuming is it to select these other presets......have to drill down a couple of layers in the remote to get to them?

Is this correct?

Yes, that is correct, however you are not really programming' anythingyou simply set the Zoom, Focus, and Electronic Shift where you want them via the remote and then select LENS MEMORY SAVE from the main menu under POSTION settings, name your settings (I use 2.35,2.40,1.85,1.78,1.33) and save to one of the six memory locations.

To recall a Lens Memory preset, you have to press the LENS button on the remote twice to access LENS MEMORY LOAD and arrow down to the preset you want and press Enter (it takes a few seconds of processing for the Zoom, Focus and Shift to adjust) and then Exit to escape the menu.

If you feel ambitious, member VirTERM did an excellent How-to on accessing the Lens Memory presets directly via RS-232 in the following thread:

AE4000 RS-232 Lens control


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

For the auto switching to work with the electronic image shift the lens must fall within the picture area of the 16x9 image............in other words for my case, the 16x9 image will be 49"x87" and the lens must be positioned within this rectangle.

Is this correct?

You got it...in simplest terms, the center of the Lens has to be at or below the top of your scope screen (at or above the bottom for table top mount) in order for the auto AR switching to work.

I chose not to use the auto AR switching because of the above limitation; I just don't want my projector hanging 12 from the ceiling or compromise the viewing height of my screen. I still use the Lens Memory presets; however I have to make a slight adjustment to the manual vertical Lens shift when I switch from 16x9 to scope' or vice versa.
post #9 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S View Post

The electronic shift will work with those other ARs (though likely that 1.33:1 will be the same settings as for 1.78:1, just with bigger side bars as it is the same height). The AE4000 is just memorising what zoom, focus and shift settings you have applied to get the image to fit the screen...nothing more.


Makes sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S View Post

It's just that with the AE4000 it is more convienient as this can be done automatically (for two memories) or buy selecting one of the six presets.

Can these 6 presets be programmed as direct access buttons on another remote? Could this be set-up to switch presets (AR's) based on auto detection of the AR?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilgore View Post

Actually, if you can shelf mount the projector so that the lens is pointed directly at the screen instead of at an angle up or down, by positioning the projector using a combination of projector tilt with lens shift, you can set up the image so that you can easily zoom from 1.78:1 to 2.35:1 and back without having to touch the lens shift at all. I've been doing this for a couple of years now and all I ever need do now is adjust the zoom ring. It works beautifully.

Very good! I had planned on shelf mounting. I wouldn't want to direct the lens at the screen on an angle anyway, as you would then have to use the keystone correction, most likely in addition to the lens shift.

Do you have the lens physically centered in the screen or are you vertically shifted up or down from center?

I've seen others here where they have the projector positioned so that the lens is either at the top or the bottom of the screen, while others are located outside of the screen area. It is these later situations that appear to have to use the manual (mechanical) lens shift feature.

Thanks for the responses,
Greg
post #10 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziptiecowboy View Post

Yes, that is correct, however you are not really programming' anythingyou simply set the Zoom, Focus, and Electronic Shift where you want them via the remote and then select LENS MEMORY SAVE from the main menu under POSTION settings, name your settings (I use 2.35,2.40,1.85,1.78,1.33) and save to one of the six memory locations.

To recall a Lens Memory preset, you have to press the LENS button on the remote twice to access LENS MEMORY LOAD and arrow down to the preset you want and press Enter (it takes a few seconds of processing for the Zoom, Focus and Shift to adjust) and then Exit to escape the menu.

If you feel ambitious, member VirTERM did an excellent How-to on accessing the Lens Memory presets directly via RS-232 in the following thread:

AE4000 RS-232 Lens control




You got it...in simplest terms, the center of the Lens has to be at or below the top of your scope screen (at or above the bottom for table top mount) in order for the auto AR switching to work.

I chose not to use the auto AR switching because of the above limitation; I just don't want my projector hanging 12 from the ceiling or compromise the viewing height of my screen. I still use the Lens Memory presets; however I have to make a slight adjustment to the manual vertical Lens shift when I switch from 16x9 to scope' or vice versa.

Thank you for the clarification.

I'll check out the RS-232 link. This does seem like a decent alternative to the anamorphic lens approach.

Thanks again,
Greg
post #11 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

Can these 6 presets be programmed as direct access buttons on another remote?

No, not that I've been able to find.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

Could this be set-up to switch presets (AR's) based on auto detection of the AR?

Yes, the auto AR switch feature will detect 16x9 or scope' AR and automatically switch between any two Lens Memory presets that you designate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

I wouldn't want to direct the lens at the screen on an angle anyway, as you would then have to use the keystone correction, most likely in addition to the lens shift.

Not necessary with the AE4000 unless you get extreme. I have my AE4000 mounted level to the ceiling, 5 above the top of my 2.35 screen and there's plenty of manual vertical Lens shift to place the 16x9 image within the screen area with absolutely no Keystone adjustment. You will be hard pressed to find another projector with the positioning versatility of the AE4000. It may not always be optimal, but Panasonic has designed this series for a WIDE array of projector positioning options.
post #12 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

Very good! I had planned on shelf mounting. I wouldn't want to direct the lens at the screen on an angle anyway, as you would then have to use the keystone correction, most likely in addition to the lens shift.

Do you have the lens physically centered in the screen or are you vertically shifted up or down from center?

I've seen others here where they have the projector positioned so that the lens is either at the top or the bottom of the screen, while others are located outside of the screen area. It is these later situations that appear to have to use the manual (mechanical) lens shift feature.

Thanks for the responses,
Greg


Center of screen. I used a level with a laser pointer to ensure that the image was centered and the PJ was perpendicular to the screen. I also made sure that the horizontal and vertical lens shift were at their midpoints before starting. I used the Constant Height 2.35:1 image on the AVSHD calibration disk to verify that zooming was working properly, and to make any necessary adjustments. Because the PJ was centered, level, and perpendicular, I was able to use lens shift to make sure both zoomed and unzoomed images were properly contained in my 2.35:1 screen. Once I had everything set up, I could use the zoom without having to adjust lens shift.
post #13 of 127
Would you zoom if you were given a isco IIIL lens still? Ihave a panny 4k and lens combo, so if you were me would you sell the lens and zoom?
post #14 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbase1 View Post

Would you zoom if you were given a isco IIIL lens still? Ihave a panny 4k and lens combo, so if you were me would you sell the lens and zoom?

Given the choice of Zoom or A-lens at no cost with the AE4000, I would still choose the simplicity of Zooming.

To me, the A-lens just puts another piece of gear into the video chain to fool with and I don't want any more complexity. There is nothing lacking in the Zoomed AE4000 image on my 122 wide scope screen IMO.

Of course, I have never seen an A-lens setup in operation, so perhaps ignorance is bliss.
post #15 of 127
It would be nice to see a panny 4k zoomed image and a 4k with isco IIIL image. I can supply the isco IIIL and 4k image, but not the zoomed because I set my projector up to go with my lens.
post #16 of 127
You could move your lens and adjust the zoom on your AE4000 so that it is zoomed. I did this recently (HD350 and Isco II setup) while I was half way through making a new mounting shelf for the Isco. I watched a film zoomed this way and missed the lensed image, so it was a noticable difference. Prior to that I'd been zooming for a couple of years, not knowing any different.

You could team up with Ziptiecowboy and have the two setup together and cover the projector lens on the unused AE4000 during testing.
post #17 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S View Post

You could move your lens and adjust the zoom on your AE4000 so that it is zoomed. I did this recently (HD350 and Isco II setup) while I was half way through making a new mounting shelf for the Isco. I watched a film zoomed this way and missed the lensed image, so it was a noticable difference. Prior to that I'd been zooming for a couple of years, not knowing any different.

You could team up with Ziptiecowboy and have the two setup together and cover the projector lens on the unused AE4000 during testing.


I just tried exactly what you did and came up with the same results, but I'm going to zoom for a couple of movies and lens for a couple of movies to at least give zooming a chance.
post #18 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S View Post

You could move your lens and adjust the zoom on your AE4000 so that it is zoomed. I did this recently (HD350 and Isco II setup) while I was half way through making a new mounting shelf for the Isco. I watched a film zoomed this way and missed the lensed image, so it was a noticable difference. Prior to that I'd been zooming for a couple of years, not knowing any different.

You could team up with Ziptiecowboy and have the two setup together and cover the projector lens on the unused AE4000 during testing.

Kelvin,

Can you describe what you liked about the lensed image, as compared to the zoomed image?

What would you say is the weak point of a lensed image, other than cost and complexity?

Thanks,
Greg
post #19 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziptiecowboy View Post

Of course, I have never seen an A-lens setup in operation, so perhaps ignorance is bliss.

I did.........and that experience is what got me excited about scope presentations! That image was drop-dead gorgeous and the scope presentation really makes it feel that much more theater-like. Now, I didn't compare lensed vs zoomed.

I saw it last week at ABT in Glenview, Illinois. I believe it was the Sony VPL-VW85 with a motorized anamorphic lens (Scheider, I think?) and a Stewart curved screen with masking panels............one expensive screen!

That presentation answered a key question for me.........screen size.

Prior to thinking about scope I decided that a 16x9 100" diag. (49"x87") was optimal for my set-up and seating distance (13.5').......I don't want too immersive of an experience. I typically sit 2/3 to 3/4 back from the screen at the theater.
Am I the only guy counting ceiling tiles to estimate the screen size and seating distance at the theater?

Then I started reading about scope screens with a lens........actually, on this site when it first got attention. The one question that I couldn't answer was if the 16x9 image was an ideal size for me what is a good 2.35 size? Well, at a 49" height that 2.35 width would be 115"............by eyeballing this on the wall it looked to large for me.

ABT just happened to be using the very same screen size that I envisioned. And I must say that it was perfect. I wouldn't want it any larger and I couldn't really go much larger anway.

I always thought that a 105" (52"x92") was too big for me.........to immersive. Based on what I just observed I think that the eyes can handle much more width, as compared to height.

Anyway..........just thought I'd share.

Greg
post #20 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregory View Post

Kelvin,

Can you describe what you liked about the lensed image, as compared to the zoomed image?

What would you say is the weak point of a lensed image, other than cost and complexity?

Thanks,
Greg

I found that the lensed image had better contrast (due to using much less zoom on the projector's own lens), brighter for the same iris position as using the whole panel on the projector (so I could close it one step and retain the same brightness, thus gaining further contrast as smaller iris on the HD350= best ON/OFF CR). Although I couldn't 'see' the pixels when zooming as I'm at approx 1.4 x width, the image did still seem more dense, or rather shots of the sky, for example, seemed to have real 'distance' to them that was missing when viewed when zooming. In a similar way to simply reducing the screen size gives a richer picture, but this way the image stays large. Of course there are no 'black' (dark grey) bars to shine on the screen wall beyond the screen edges (I have a dark matt brown painted screen wall rather than pure black as it's a living room). Granted this would be less noticable in a dedicated room with black cloth/velvet surrounding a screen. Also with the lens in place it blocks some light spill from my projector that previously would light up part of my ceiling above my seat (though this could be solve by placing some sort of mask in front of the projector to be fair).

Aside from cost (approx 1/3 the current list price as it was secondhand) and the initial setting up, the only issues I have are slight pincusion due to my screen being flat, so I slightly overscan the image. However, I'm at a very long throw so even this is minimal. I thought at first that the lens might be causing some fringing effect on a white crosshatch test pattern, but it is there without the lens in place, so that is just the slight missconvergance of my HD350 (need to be within a few feet of the screen to see, so not too bad anyway). My Isco II slightly enlarges the image when in place, so for 16:9 viewing without the lens I have to adjust the projector's zoom to compensate, so I don't have a true CIH setup if I just move the lens, but for all but the most critical of viewing I can leave the lens in place for 16:9 and use the squeeze mode on my VP.

I should add that around the time of getting my lens I moved my projector to a higher position, which means I have to apply some lens shift (it was dead centre before). This has a side benefit on the HD350 of improving ANSI contrast, so it is noticably better in this regard. It was apparent on certain end credits that I was seeing a 'ghost' image of the white titles, which must have been effecting the 'in scene' contrast, depending on where the 'ghost' landed it could have lightened supposedly dark areas. However, removing the lens doesn't seem to further increase ANSI (though I have no way to measure it) any noticable amount and others have reported that the Isco doesn't impact on ANSI contrast anyway.

I hope that helps, though to be fair, I was a disbeliever before the lens came up so I only bought it as a trial intending to sell it on once I'd 'proved' it was a waste of time...but I still have it.
post #21 of 127
Thread Starter 
Kelvin,

Very detailed comparison............thank you!

My first goal will be to determine if the AE4000 or any other contenders will work within the constraints of my room. When this is determined I will probably determine if an anamorphic lens will work...........just in case!

My family room will also be doing double duty as a theater. My goal is to make the family room look as much as possible like a family room when the screen is hidden (need a motorized screen) and too look as theater like as possible when it's movie time. I want vertical masking that will probably take the form of curtains.............black is not an option, however a dark maroon would work. I have some other hair-brained ideas, but they are more complex. Although, I am also entertaining the idea of stowable masking panels.......someone here is doing this.

Thanks again,
Greg
post #22 of 127
Glad it was useful Greg, mine is a living room too so not able to make it a complete batcave, though I use a 7' deep 'Bat Tent' when watching films, that stows away after use...makes all the difference to PQ.

I've been planing removable side masking panels made from 6mm MDF covered with stick on black velvet, with hooks at the top to hang from the screen pelmet. Due to the small amount of 16:9 viewing (and it I tend view these without the lens, so the side bars are 'non projected') I haven't rushed to do this yet.
post #23 of 127
I have question who own the panasonic4000u
As the avsfourms.tv says it this PJ can switch 16.9 to 2.35.1 screen that’s why I bought 138” 2.35.1 screen..
Problem is is not any DVDS or anything put out true 2.35.1 to fill my whole screen …so can stored it in my lens memory. Just mad because I bought screen like 2.35.1 and cant use that in full effect of it when I watch movies … when I watch movies.. Is 2 type of rations one is like HBO movies is higher in top and bottom and another is like 16.9 1.85 or so on put out by blu-rays player
So player putout a but wider on side ways and shorter on top or bottom…don’t matter says it back the DVD 2.35.1 ratio just plays like that is like 1.85.1 ratio looks. so cant get that 2.35.1 ratio again.
So any body can help me how can I get that 2.35.1 ratio so enjoy my cinemascope ratio to fill the whole screen?

Thanks
post #24 of 127
BenjaminK it sounds like you are viewing films that are possibly mastered in 2.40:1 format. This means that if you have a 2.35:1 screen (like me) then you will get very small black bars top and bottom for most films. It seems very few discs are actually in 2.35:1 format.

I slightly overzoom my image on 2.40:1 so it overspills the sides, then use my Lumagen video processor to electronically trim the sides to fit the screen (losing about 2" each side so not a major worry). I believe that the AE4000 has some kind of triming controls so this may help you achieve a similar effect. If you came across a 2.35:1 disc, then you could zoom back slightly and turn the triming off perhaps?

On the other hand, if you are trying to make your AE4000 fill your 2.35:1 screen for all aspect ratios then it can't be done (or even if it could everyone would look short and fat).
post #25 of 127
Thanks Kevin
This is my first PJ & that avsfoums.tv sold this pj and the screen ratio to buy..
Would u please tell me step by step with my PJ remote to do setting pleases?
Plus i didnt get what is u says "then use my Lumagen video processor to electronically trim the sides to fit the screen just cant get that" ..please break it down to me so just gonna do it with my PJ 4000u remote ..Thanks

P.S
i just trying to use much of my 2.35.1 screen to watch movies that all ,insted get wasted!
post #26 of 127
Hi Benjamin, my Lumagen Video processor is a separate piece of equipment that allows extra control of the image (greyscale, upscaling, size, position and cropping controls). Some of these controls might be in your AE4000 though you may not have such a range of controls to adjust your picture. I thought that I read the AE4000 could crop the image if required (perhaps an AE4000 owner might read this and confirm), I had the older AE3000 but I've sold it now.

Firstly, to get this really clear: You can't fill your screen 'so nothing is wasted' on every type of film or content. If you watch a TV show or game on your projector it will likely be 16:9 (1.78:1) format. If you have a 2.35:1 screen this will fill the screen's height, but leave black bars on the sides. Only when you watch a 2.35:1 film can your screen be perfectly filled.

I know this is your first projector, so I hope this isn't too dissapointing for you: There is nothing you can do that will fill your 2.35:1 screen if viewing 16:9 content without distorting the image (making people look short and fat) or cutting off parts of the image by overscaning.

The usual solution is to have black material 'masks' to cover the sides of the screen when viewing 16:9 content on 2.35:1 screens.
post #27 of 127
Ok thanks kevin..
Just those 2 VIDS about this PJ in AVSFOURMS.TV made it soo easy in great look & lens feather to selling this PJ to people like me & then most just B.S and cant get that way as they says, I guess is just marketing it for fresh headed people like me to buy it..
But thanks to clear that out for me

good week-end
post #28 of 127
No worries Benjamin. If it's any consellation plenty of other AE3000/4000 buyers have made the same mistake on believing that these projectors performed some kind of miracle to make 16:9 'fit' a 2.35:1 screen, but without distorting the image.
post #29 of 127
so if i have an epson 8100 and a 84" 2.35 screen can i position the image of my 2.35 blu-ray movie so just the film image falls on the screen and the top/bottom black bars fall off the screen? do i have to use zoom or what?
post #30 of 127
Yes, zoom and some lens shift. You throw the black bars off the top and bottom of the screen.
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