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New Casio projectors: LED/Laser, 720p, compact

post #1 of 876
Thread Starter 
I just saw this and I didn't find any topics here:

Specs: http://www.casio.com/news/content/B8...-9D996571F28B/





CASIO RELEASES WORLD'S FIRST* MERCURY-FREE HIGH-BRIGHTNESS PROJECTORS
New SuperSlim Projectors Feature Newly Developed Laser & LED Hybrid Light Source

LAS VEGAS, NV, January 6, 2010 - Casio America, Inc., and its parent company, Casio Computer Co., Ltd., today announced that it has created a mercury-free laser & LED hybrid light source, capable of high-brightness projection for use in the next-generation projectors the company has developed under its "clean & green" concept. Casio is releasing a line of GREEN SLIM projectors with the new light source, introducing the world's first* mercury-free high-brightness data projectors.

Currently, high-pressure mercury lamps are used as the light source for data projectors capable of producing 2,000 or more lumens. Semiconductor light sources that do not contain environmentally harmful mercury such as Laser and LED offer promising light sources for next-generation DLP® projectors. Until now, however, they were only usable as light sources for small, low-lumen projectors because high-output sources capable of producing green light have not been possible for mass production.

Casio has changed all this by creating an original mercury-free hybrid light source capable of generating high brightness by combining a laser, a fluorescent element and an LED. Casio has achieved high output of green light, which has been considered difficult with conventional semiconductor light sources, by very efficiently converting blue laser light into green light, using the fluorescent element. The high-brightness light of 2,000 or more lumens was then attained by projecting blue laser light, green light converted from blue laser light with the fluorescent element, and light emitted by a red LED through a DLP® chip onto the screen.

Use of the laser & LED hybrid light source makes Casio's GREEN SLIM projectors the world's first data projectors bright enough (2,000-3,000 lumens) for projection in a well lit room without using a high-pressure mercury lamp. Usability features have also been greatly improved: the

* As of January 7, 2010, for high-brightness data projectors with at least 2,000 lumens. According to a Casio survey.

body, no bigger than the size of a standard 8 ½ x 11 piece of paper, is slim (1.7 inches) and lightweight (5 lbs). Additional qualities include: the projector produces bright colors through upgraded color purity, the light source has a life of approximately 20,000 hours, projection at maximum brightness is possible in a minimum of eight seconds and no cool down is needed when turning the projectors off.

"Casio is thrilled to introduce this entirely new lineup of eco-friendly Super Slim projectors," said Toshiharu Okimuro, Chairman of Casio America, Inc. "The advances we have made to provide superior brightness and energy-saving features make it the perfect tool for the road warrior, instructor, gamer and general consumer for home entertainment."

GREEN SLIM Projectors will be available in a diverse lineup, including a model that can accommodate WXGA Real display at 1280 × 800 dots (16:10) and a model that can project without a PC and can communicate wirelessly with PCs. These projectors will greatly broaden the possibilities for visual communication thanks to Casio's advanced laser & LED hybrid light source, which will fundamentally change the status quo in projectors and provide enhanced features that make the projectors usable in diverse situations.

■ Laser & LED hybrid light source that enables mercury-free high-brightness projectors with high picture quality, long light source life, and quick powering on and off
■ Slim (1.7 inches) and light (5 lbs) highly portable 8 ½ x 11 inch body
■ Wide-angle 2X optical zoom for use in diverse settings, ranging from small meeting spaces to large conference rooms
■ USB host function for projection without a PC and capability for wireless communication with PCs (XJ-A255/A245/155/145)

Casio will continue expanding its lineup by aggressively developing more products with the new laser & LED hybrid light source, including smaller projectors for individual use.

Main Features of Casio's GREEN SLIM Projectors

■ Laser & LED hybrid light source that enables mercury-free, high-brightness projection
High-brightness projection is achieved without using a high-pressure mercury lamp by using blue light emitted by a blue laser, green light converted from blue laser light with a fluorescent element, and light emitted by a high-lumen red LED through a DLP® chip onto the screen.

■ Standard paper-size, high-brightness projectors
High-brightness projection is achieved at a maximum of 3,000 ANSI lumens (XJ-A255/A250/A155/A150) with a laser & LED hybrid light source in a slim (43 mm) and lightweight (2.3 kg) standard paper-size body. These projectors can be carried together with documents without being bulky and can project clear images even in brightly lit rooms.

■ Superior color reproducibility increases presentation impact
The laser & LED hybrid light source greatly improves color purity compared to high-pressure mercury lamps. It enables the production of beautifully vivid colors and projects clear, powerful images with visual effects of high color purity.

■ Longer light source life
Use of the laser & LED hybrid light source increases the light source life to approximately 20,000 hours-nearly 10 times that of Casio's conventional products (XJ-S58, etc.) with a high-pressure mercury lamp-which means less maintenance and lower operating costs. Moreover, brightness deteriorates more slowly than with mercury lamps, so clear image quality can be maintained for a long time.

■ Quick powering on and off, an advantage for smooth presentations
Projection at maximum brightness is possible in a minimum of eight seconds, and no cool down is needed when turning the projectors off. Thus, limited presentation time can be utilized effectively by enabling a smooth presentation flow from set-up to clean-up.

■ Wide-angle 2X optical zoom gives users freedom of projector setup
These models come with a wide-angle 2X zoom lens (lens with a two times shorter focal distance) that provides the greatest magnification* of any data projector. They are also equipped with a feature that automatically corrects vertical distortion of the display due to projector position, enabling effective use in diverse settings ranging from small meeting spaces to large conference rooms and classrooms.

■ HDMI terminal
These models are equipped with an HDMI terminal that can transmit digital audio/video with only one cable. It enables AV devices and PCs also equipped with an HDMI terminal to be easily connected to the projectors, which can then project the contents with no loss of quality.

■ Wide picture in real display (XJ-A255/250/A245/A240)
Able to accommodate WXGA Real display at 1280 × 800 dots (16:10), these models can display wide presentation materials and images in real size.

■ Wireless communication with PCs (XJ-A255/A245/A155/A145)
These models can communicate wirelessly (IEEE 802.11b/g) with up to four Windows® PCs, enabling meetings in which multiple PCs are brought together and presentations that can be conducted easily and remotely from a location away from the projector.

* As of January 7, 2010. According to a Casio survey.

■ USB 2.0 host function enables presentations without a PC (XJ-A255/A245/A155/A145)
These models can project presentations, spreadsheets, word-processor documents, PDF files and other data* prepared on a PC, still images (JPEG/BMP), and moving images (AVI format: Motion JPEG) all without a PC just by using commercially available USB memory. They can also be connected directly to the Multiprojection Camera YC-430, which can project non-digitized information and even three-dimensional objects onto the screen.

■ The projectors can also be fixed to the ceiling with separately sold metal ceiling-mount fittings.

Source:
http://gizmodo.com/5441761/casios-gr...=Google+Reader
post #2 of 876
can't wait until this kind of thing makes its way into home theater use.
the idea of not having to worry about bulb life/wear would be amazing
post #3 of 876
Truly can't wait for this tech to become relatively cheap. I'll jump on the first high quality LED PJ @ 720p and above I can get for $2000 or less.
post #4 of 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by klas View Post

■ Laser & LED hybrid light source that enables mercury-free, high-brightness projection
High-brightness projection is achieved without using a high-pressure mercury lamp by using blue light emitted by a blue laser, green light converted from blue laser light with a fluorescent element, and light emitted by a high-lumen red LED through a DLP® chip onto the screen.

Looks like exciting stuff. I am unclear about one thing in the above sentence though. I'm assuming that it means that all 3 lights are going through the DLP chip and not that the lasers are scanning individual elements onto the screen without going through the DLP chip with only the red using the DLP chip to modulate, but seems like it could be read either way.

I also wonder why they chose LED for the red light instead of also using laser for it. Are red lasers expensive, more difficult to get brighter, or something like that?

--Darin
post #5 of 876
Thread Starter 
so any bets on the price, I really hope that 720p model (without wireless) will be below $1k

here are more specs:
http://www.casio.com/news/content/B8...-9D996571F28B/
post #6 of 876
It sounds like it would work fine for PC use (presentations, etc.), However, from the descriptions, it doesn't sound like it has the capability of showing high quality video (movie) images. Mixing light sources, usually is not compatible with the specifications for color balance and color temperature.

I hope they can prove me wrong, but don't hold you breath.
post #7 of 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by CT_Wiebe View Post

It sounds like it would work fine for PC use (presentations, etc.), However, from the descriptions, it doesn't sound like it has the capability of showing high quality video (movie) images. Mixing light sources, usually is not compatible with the specifications for color balance and color temperature.

I hope they can prove me wrong, but don't hold you breath.

I'm not sure about which color would be the brightest compared to D65, but if it were red then it seems that all they would have to do is let the red LED be turned down (either in time or intensity). That is one nice thing about LEDs versus light bulbs. If you turn gain down for one primary with the bulb the black level tends to stay the same and so on/off CR goes down. But with an LED they could turn both white level and black level for that color down together by dimming the LED itself to get to D65. The same seems like it would apply to the lasers, so getting the right color balance and color temperature may just be a matter of putting the right controls in.

These look like business projectors and so may not have those, but for home theater versions it doesn't seem like it would be that complicated to give the right controls. Although Casio may not have the IP in house since they don't seem to be big into home theater, but I'm guessing there are other companies willing to provide things for this.

--Darin
post #8 of 876
Thread Starter 
I don't understand why would you say it wouldn't it work for videos.
post #9 of 876
Maybe the color spectrum with this method of attaining a bright green isn't really true hue, and so it's not suitable for high-end video reproduction? I'd love to know more... sounds like it could be a great approach to LED/laser FP if this really did solve the brightness problem.
post #10 of 876
Wow, that came out of left field, exciting stuff.

1800:1 CR though; I wonder how much light needs to be sacrificed to increase that an order og magnitude or so.

"Mixing light sources, usually is not compatible with the specifications for color balance and color temperature."

I'm afraid there might be an impediment to getting this tech into HT pj's, as I don't believe Casio is interested in that market, and probably has a lot of the tech protected.

Why do you say that - what precedence is there for mixing light sources?

Not that it matters IMO; colored light is colored light, and I don't think it matters one iota what the source is.

They just have to be mixed in proper proportion, but that's true for a single light source.
post #11 of 876
I agree, this is a happy piece of news. Holding off on the question of if it works for HT or not. As most of you know, many folks started down the HT PJ path by bringing home a business projector from the office over the weekend. Who knows, perhaps we'll be surprised at how it works in the media room. At any rate, it's good to see this development.
post #12 of 876
Casio will continue expanding its lineup by aggressively developing more products with the new laser & LED hybrid light source, including smaller projectors for individual use.

OMG, Casio delivered the biggest news from CES so far for me. 3000 ANSI lumens, unbelievable.
post #13 of 876
OK, we need someone to get one of these in hand and review it.
Jason?
Art?
Bueller?
Anyone?
post #14 of 876
post #15 of 876
thanks for those links!

so ironic that with all the problem with LED Projectors being "dim", this one is so bright that it can be used for conference settings. Clearly they are on to something. I know that solid-state LED has a long life span and one with consistent output, I wonder what their hybrid-green element ages like... will it also be consistent with the red and blue as the PJ clocks in hours? If so, then some HT oriented manufacturer better take a look at this approach and fast. We want to get rid of bulbs!

BTW, I had heard Mitsu say that laser isn't appropriate for FP because of risk of eye injury. This PJ uses a blue laser though a red LED, and it's bright after all, so wonder why that isn't an issue here?
post #16 of 876
All the MFT want the Bulbs for replacement commissions.

1. Mits Laser GONE
2. Samsung LED GONE - I OWN

I want more that this tech refined. The DEATH with BULBs!
post #17 of 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaViD Boulet View Post

BTW, I had heard Mitsu say that laser isn't appropriate for FP because of risk of eye injury. This PJ uses a blue laser though a red LED, and it's bright after all, so wonder why that isn't an issue here?

I'm just guessing here but they must destroy laser coherence. Speckle would also be eliminated. Laser light then becomes just another incoherent light source (but with longer life and broader color space).
post #18 of 876
"All the MFT want the Bulbs for replacement commissions."

People often say that, but if it were true, instead of adding more cheaper, more reliable components over time, they would be adding unreliable profit-earning ones instead.

Lamps are a huge customer relations headache for mfgr's.
post #19 of 876
I disagree!

If commissions were off the table they would allow non-OEM black market bulbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by noah katz View Post

"All the MFT want the Bulbs for replacement commissions."

People often say that, but if it were true, instead of adding more cheaper, more reliable components over time, they would be adding unreliable profit-earning ones instead.

Lamps are a huge customer relations headache for mfgr's.
post #20 of 876
"If commissions were off the table they would allow non-OEM black market bulbs."

What black market bulbs? These things are really hard to make.
post #21 of 876
Thread Starter 

Ok, so it's safe to assume that higher end one with WXGA & 3000 lumens will be over $1k.
post #22 of 876
RED & GREEN is lasers, BLUE - LED ?
post #23 of 876
the lasers we know are harmful to the human eye,so this system has to be changing it somehow into normal light.
post #24 of 876
I see the price in a couple of UK stores as follows;


Casio XJ-A140
£742 + VAT
(£871.85 with VAT)

Casio XJ-A145
£887 + VAT
(£1,042.23 with VAT)
post #25 of 876
post #26 of 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsv View Post

RED & GREEN is lasers, BLUE - LED ?

I've found answer:

"It uses a Red LED and a blue laser. Green comes from a phosphor wheel, part of which is clear to transmit the blue laser light and part is covered with a green phosphor to convert the blue to green."

LED, Laser and color(phosphor) wheel in same projector!!!
post #27 of 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by darinp2 View Post

Looks like exciting stuff. I am unclear about one thing in the above sentence though. I'm assuming that it means that all 3 lights are going through the DLP chip and not that the lasers are scanning individual elements onto the screen without going through the DLP chip with only the red using the DLP chip to modulate, but seems like it could be read either way.

I also wonder why they chose LED for the red light instead of also using laser for it. Are red lasers expensive, more difficult to get brighter, or something like that?

--Darin

High power Red lasers are harder to make and have been the hang up for years.
post #28 of 876
you can preorder the xj-a240 (which is in my opinion the most interesting model of range) at german amazon for 1119 which is about 1613 usd.
the only thing i am asking about is the estimated lifetime. most of competitors have about 30-60k hours. why just 20k?
post #29 of 876
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by travis_bickle View Post

you can preorder the xj-a240 (which is in my opinion the most interesting model of range) at german amazon for 1119 which is about 1613 usd.
the only thing i am asking about is the estimated lifetime. most of competitors have about 30-60k hours. why just 20k?

Wouldn't extra 500 lumens make a difference on XJ-A250?
post #30 of 876
"why just 20k?"

Perhaps it's limited by the green phosphor.
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