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Jet Family Theater build is about to begin - Page 20

post #571 of 589
Thread Starter 
Now my next task is installing theater door. My rough opening height is just 81.5", I got an 80" solid core slab, door header board takes 3/4", so just about 1/2" gap left between the bottom of the door and unfinished concrete floor, that seems to be not enough, plus, I want to install a door threshold to seal the door when it is closed.

Here is the jamb and header board I installed:
From outside looking in:


From inside looking out:


This is the slabs, I got two, one from HD, 36"x80", one old slab, has some damage on corner, 35 3/4"x79 1/2", both solid core heave slabs, about 50lbs maybe:


The door threshold, as you can see, it is for exterior door, and it is about 1.5" tall profile, so if I install the threshold, means that I need to cut slab short about 2":




Threshold placed in the door opening:


Another question, do you install slab directly on concrete floor? If so, the one I have has no hole, it was originally stapled on to the two side door jamb. So I need to drill 3 holes on the aluminum and screw down to concrete floor that way? I need some advices here.

About cutting slab door, after cut, the bottom will be unfinished, so what do you do?
post #572 of 589
After doing all those frames, would you recommend going with a track system?
post #573 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdika17 View Post

After doing all those frames, would you recommend going with a track system?

It depends, if you want to have the office cubical wall look with nice bevel edge, sure, fabricmate's track system is a easy way to go. For me, I personally do not like the commercial look. That is just my personal taste, but I have nothing to against track system, they are easy to use and you can install the wall rather quickly.
post #574 of 589
If you are talking trim carpentry, such as baseboard, etc. It is typically installed before the carpet but you must suspend the base molding 3/8" above the floor. You can easily do this just by setting some scrap 3/8" blocking on the floor to space your moulding at an even height around your room. Plus you can create the last of the sawdust, stain/paint and caulk before the carpet goes in.

Second, I would never frame a wall on top of a carpet, so build your walls first, even if the carpet must be trimmed around the wall.

Yes, you will need to install the threshold to the slab. I haven't personally seen an exterior threshold used in quite this way. To me the high side would appear to be a tripping hazard (especially in a dark room) and the low side would be difficult to match up with your flooring. They make perfectly flat thresholds that essentially form a " double T". I would then use a drop-down sweep to close off the underside of the door - or perhaps just a traditional under-door sweep. Contact Ted at the Soundproofing Company and talk to him about some of their Zero International products. The sweep is a bit pricey but worth every penny IMHO.

Typically the ends of the cut door are primed / sealed to prevent any moisture problems / potential future warping issues.

Nice call on the black - really makes things nicer than the blue in my opinion. Keep up the good work!
post #575 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

If you are talking trim carpentry, such as baseboard, etc. It is typically installed before the carpet but you must suspend the base molding 3/8" above the floor. You can easily do this just by setting some scrap 3/8" blocking on the floor to space your moulding at an even height around your room. Plus you can create the last of the sawdust, stain/paint and caulk before the carpet goes in.

Second, I would never frame a wall on top of a carpet, so build your walls first, even if the carpet must be trimmed around the wall.

Yes, you will need to install the threshold to the slab. I haven't personally seen an exterior threshold used in quite this way. To me the high side would appear to be a tripping hazard (especially in a dark room) and the low side would be difficult to match up with your flooring. They make perfectly flat thresholds that essentially form a " double T". I would then use a drop-down sweep to close off the underside of the door - or perhaps just a traditional under-door sweep. Contact Ted at the Soundproofing Company and talk to him about some of their Zero International products. The sweep is a bit pricey but worth every penny IMHO.

Typically the ends of the cut door are primed / sealed to prevent any moisture problems / potential future warping issues.

Nice call on the black - really makes things nicer than the blue in my opinion. Keep up the good work!

Thanks TMcG for your advices, I am thinking doing the trim pieces after installing carpet only because the weather is still cold and I don't want do the staining/painting the trim piece inside, last time I did my columns, the smell was horrible, especially when the gas heater was running, sucking all the molecules and burned them, creating a such strong smell that I had to open all the windows to flush them out. But it looks like this year it won't get any colder, usually day temperature is around mid 40s to low 50s, I think I can stain/paint in garage.

OK, I will probably build false wall first.

I might consider acoustic threshold that Ted is selling, but I will stop by HD to check out what other threshold they have first instead the exterior aluminum one. But even I go with the door sweep type of threshold, I still need to cut 1/2" off the slab door, do you know how thick is the fame on the bottom of the slab?

Columns, I still have not installed the columns, thinking the carpet installers would hate to see those column installed because they then have to slide the carpet under the columns.
post #576 of 589
Talk with John or Ted at the Soundproofing Company before you install your threshold. I was just talking to them today about this exact topic since I just ordered my door today. From what I understand, there are two issues with the threshold you show in your picture:

  1. The hollow, lightweight aluminum doesn't provide any mass and can resonate causing sound leaks.
  2. The grooves in the top of the threshold will not provide a good seal. You want something smooth and flat like hardwood or marble. Try looking for a flooring transition piece that is a few inches wide.
Nick
post #577 of 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

...I might consider acoustic threshold that Ted is selling, but I will stop by HD to check out what other threshold they have first instead the exterior aluminum one. But even I go with the door sweep type of threshold, I still need to cut 1/2" off the slab door, do you know how thick is the fame on the bottom of the slab?...

Here is a data point, my door sat about 1 3/4" from the floor prior to installing the threshold. I used a 3/4" piece of granite back splash as my threshold gluing it directly to the concrete. This then gave me about a 3/4" space under the door. I then installed the door seal from The Soundproofing Company.
post #578 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas View Post

Talk with John or Ted at the Soundproofing Company before you install your threshold. I was just talking to them today about this exact topic since I just ordered my door today. From what I understand, there are two issues with the threshold you show in your picture:

  1. The hollow, lightweight aluminum doesn't provide any mass and can resonate causing sound leaks.
  2. The grooves in the top of the threshold will not provide a good seal. You want something smooth and flat like hardwood or marble. Try looking for a flooring transition piece that is a few inches wide.
Nick

The threshold is not hollow, it has hardwood inserts in the aluminum frame. The top sill of the threshold is hard wood and smooth surface. But like TMcG said, its 1 1/2" high could be a tripping hazards. I think I still need a threshold as the transition from carpet in the theater room to hardwood floor outside. Acoustic threshold from Ted is a good option if carpet all around. But again, even with a threshold, Ted's product is still a good addition with or without threshold so I might consider that. Thanks for the advice.
post #579 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZGAMD View Post

Here is a data point, my door sat about 1 3/4" from the floor prior to installing the threshold. I used a 3/4" piece of granite back splash as my threshold gluing it directly to the concrete. This then gave me about a 3/4" space under the door. I then installed the door seal from The Soundproofing Company.

That's interesting idea. Do you have a picture of it?
post #580 of 589
One thing I noticed that you might want to look into are the door mounting clips you used to install your door jamb. I used those in my basement and had very good luck with them, but I plan on hanging my theater door the traditional way...mostly because of the additional weight compared to the normal doors.

Maybe you were planning to do that all along, I just wanted to mention it to help prevent any movement problems in the future.
post #581 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brausch View Post

One thing I noticed that you might want to look into are the door mounting clips you used to install your door jamb. I used those in my basement and had very good luck with them, but I plan on hanging my theater door the traditional way...mostly because of the additional weight compared to the normal doors.

Maybe you were planning to do that all along, I just wanted to mention it to help prevent any movement problems in the future.

Thank you, yes, I will do shims and nailing/screwing through the jamb into the king studs. Mounting clips just give me a easier way of perfectly aligning the door horizontally.
post #582 of 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

Thank you, yes, I will do shims and nailing/screwing through the jamb into the king studs. Mounting clips just give me a easier way of perfectly aligning the door horizontally.


I agree, I will likely do the same thing.
post #583 of 589
Hey Walkinator. This is the door sweep from the soundproofing company that I was talking about: http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...c-door-bottom/

You can either route a channel in the bottom of the door to accommodate this item or it can also be surface mounted. I would also recommend the soundproof door jambs: http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...oor-jamb-stop/

As for the "plate" at the bottom on the floor. If you have hardwoods running up to the theater, just use that. Otherwise you will need a smooth transition piece to get the best seal.

I also wouldn't bother putting carpet underneath your columns. I would highly recommend completing all the construction aspects of your theater first - installing columns, installing front screen wall, installing your moldings - because working around finish materials (such as installed carpet) is a total pain in the butt.

Good luck!
post #584 of 589
Thread Starter 
I got a nasty cold in past few days so not much get done, but I do get screen false wall installed today, Quick question about screen aspect ratio, it should be 1:2.35, 1:2.37 or 1:2.4?
post #585 of 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

I got a nasty cold in past few days so not much get done, but I do get screen false wall installed today, Quick question about screen aspect ratio, it should be 1:2.35, 1:2.37 or 1:2.4?

Hello,

Good to see someone from philly suburb building a HT. I am also in the same process, but never started a thread yet. Myn is only about 13' x 18' for the theater, and i am currently working on the false wall and stage.

Did you get the FR701 for your wall panels, if so, did you get it local.
Hopefully, i'll start my own thread soon. But, anyway, i am taking pictures as i progress.

TQ
post #586 of 589
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdeepak View Post

Hello,

Good to see someone from philly suburb building a HT. I am also in the same process, but never started a thread yet. Myn is only about 13' x 18' for the theater, and i am currently working on the false wall and stage.

Did you get the FR701 for your wall panels, if so, did you get it local.
Hopefully, i'll start my own thread soon. But, anyway, i am taking pictures as i progress.

TQ

Well, if you are talking about wall fabric, the red one I got from JoMar, the black fabric is not FR701, but it is acoustic fabric, I ordered from http://www.acoustimac.com/index.php/...-the-yard.html. I am not sure where you live, but JoMar has 5 stores around the area so there maybe one that is close to you. If you can find the fabric there, usually is dirty cheap, $2 a yard. Last time I checked, they still have some darker red acoustic fabric exactly like FR701, but I cannot find any similar black there. That being said, they do have a lot of black fabric could be used as acoustic fabric, if either you see lights through the fabric, or blow air and can feel on your hand on the other side, then it is acoustic and should be fine. Couple of things, weave pattern might be different, if that is not an issue to you, then make sure you break couple of threads and burn it, if it just melts, then it is polyester type material so it is fire retardant.
post #587 of 589
Hello??? Anyone alive?
post #588 of 589
Hi Walkinator - we haven't heard from you in quite some time. Are you still working away on the theater?
post #589 of 589
We need updates!!!!!!!!!!!
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