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Wireless Router

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm being sure I understand this corretly. If I read correctly on IGN the wii wi-fi will only work with up to G speeds? So since this is the only thing I will use wirelessly I might as well get a cheap G router instead of an N? I really can't afford much lately to begin with so I don't want to get an N for some potential future use and just want to make do with whatever is the best I can get for the wii alone at a low price.
post #2 of 28
Yup, a $35-40 G router will be as good as the Wii will ever need.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
But you were having a lot of pros and went to wired, didn't you? I sure hope somehow this ends up being manageable wirelessly. Like I said nothing else will be on the router, but I have a feeling it will still suck. It sure didn't do good at my parents' house with their router.
post #4 of 28
Oh yeah, wireless on the Wii sucks. I was just answering your original question of whether getting anything better than G would be advantageous. If you can stay hard-wired, then do it, but I recall you stating that that will not be an option sometime soon.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Yeah the computer is nowhere near the tv now wheras I used to have them within like 2 feet of each other for all these years since the wii release. I can't think of much else to do. A few days ago I wanted to DL some songs on GH5 so I unplugged everything from the computer and took it and the modem in the other room (without bothering with the monitor) and did it wired. It only takes like 5 minutes to do that, but sure not ideal to have to move a computer back and forth so I was only doing it when I badly need to use the connection.

Hmm if there's a way to get long cables though I guess I could do it. If the ethernet cable going into the modem and the cable that goes between modem and router were like maybe 24-30 feet I could just simply use those when necessary which is at least better than moving a computer.

edit: I see there are a ton of 25 and 50 foot ethernet cables, but do you happen to know what category they need to say when I'm using it with a cable modem? Also is the cable that goes from modem to router also simply an ethernet cable also? It looks about the same. If this is the case I could buy 2 ethernet cables for like $20-$30 and boom keep my wired connection and simply have the cable unhooked most of the time to avoid it looking bad... or else figure a way to have it not noticable.
post #6 of 28
Monoprice.com should have 25-50ft ethernet for really cheap. Cat 5, Cat 5e, or Cat 6 would all be just fine for use with the Wii. 5e and 6 are for gigabit and higher, though they work with 100mbps just fine. Cat 5 was designed for 100mbps ethernet, before gigabit ethernet existed.

I personally have a hardwired cable going from my living room to my computer room, hiding the cable under the baseboard, and then another hardwire cable running in to the bedroom from the living room, staple gunned up into the ceiling corner for the most part.
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
If I buy long ethernet cables, though, I need to not only be sure it's good enough for the wii, but one that won't lower my internet speeds on my computer. I'm not sure there's a way for me to know what class ethernet cable was provided by Comcast.

Also isn't the cable that comes with the wired router also an ethernet? I'm just being sure I need two ethernet rather than one of something else.
post #8 of 28
Yes, the cable from the modem to the router is ethernet.
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
ok, thanks very much.

You not sure about classes as far as them being able to handle cable internet? I guess I need to look at specs. I remember the connection can handle up to 12MB down, but not sure up. I guess I just be sure it handles the 12? Or will most any do that?

edit: on monoprice I only see it say "network cables". Is that just another name for the same thing? It doesn't technically say ethernet aywhere and also I wonder if class 6 is incompatible for some reason.

edit2: well yeah it appears network cable and ethernet are the same thing... although some say "patch" cable and some don't. So I'm confused about that and also if cat6 works with everything.
post #10 of 28
To make your network a little more futureproof for when you move to gigabit connection everywhere, just get Cat 6 ethernet cables.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/su...02&cp_id=10232

Anything labeled as "straight" in this range will work for you, just pick the length and color that you want. Avoid the "crossover" cables, as they are intended more for direct PC-to-PC connections without the use of a router/hub.

As an example:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2
post #11 of 28
Oh, and yes, "network cables" is the same thing as "ethernet cables".
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Your example is one that is NOT a crossover, right? I'm being sure I'm not missing something and that you were giving an example of one, as I haven't seen any say crossover.

Anyway the one I almost ordered earlier was apparently ok. The first one in the 50 foot category. I better measure and be sure if I could get by with 30 first though. I also wonder why it says patch cable. It makes it sound like it's not a full ethernet cable, but an extender. But it looks to be a full one.
post #13 of 28
ah, they are "patch" in that they patch a connection between two devices.
post #14 of 28
I don't think you can buy anything other than category 6 any more. Also you should definitely get the longer cable unless you are a measuring champion.
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Well it seems like 30 feet will be barely enough. I hate to go up to the 50 and have 20 feet of cable wasted. So hopefully I did measure properly.
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
For some reason having issues with the wired connection. The cat6 straight from modem to computer works. Yet if I involve the router it no longer works. I've even switched the cables back and forth between the two places on teh back of my router. This all worked with the other cables.
post #17 of 28
If the cable works from the modem to the computer, then the cable is probably good. At this point you would be looking at router configuration issues.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
Well so far I can't figure it out. I went into my router via the ip address to it and i tried a couple of automatic setups and couldn't get it to work.

edit: I guess I got it working, but it was an annoyingly long hassle and now really all I can do is have cables in the middle of the floor and so I'll have to have it either look bad or not have it hooked up this way when people are here. lol
post #19 of 28
Please help. I'm going to purchase my first router and need a recommendation. I plan to hard wire to my computer and sony bluray player with cat 6 for streaming netflix, but thought I might go ahead a get a router that also has wireless capabilities for the future (ie laptop and/or wii). I'm hoping to come in around $60 or less. Is this possible? Any help would be appreciated.
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
Someone on another site told me "b" routers are very slow, "g" are decent, and "n" are the ones to get. That's about all I personally know still. And they said be sure to read security instructions. Otherwise I just go on Amazon and read average ratings for the various brands.
post #21 of 28
Do you know exactly what a gigabit router is and is it worth spending the extra money?
post #22 of 28
Wow, I wanted to avoid hard wiring anything since my DSL modem is on the upper level and the Wii and Oppo BDP-83SE are on the lower level, with the main floor in between. That'd be two floors to run cable down, with no attractive way to do it.

Despite my concern about a good signal, the Wii locked onto my wi-fi signal and has never dropped it. Same for the Oppo, which I connected to an Airport Express I had lying around. I'm able to do upgrades without a hitch, and I can access the Web content for both quite painlessly.

I'm running an Apple Airport Extreme, and it seems to cover the whole house and yard with ease. I worry about my little soldiers, though...
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Other people say they've had big trouble with wireless connections for the wii though, as i also did. Me personally I don't like using a lot of wireless things anyway since they always end up saying everything causes cancer eventually.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by BASHERS33 View Post

Other people say they've had big trouble with wireless connections for the wii though, as i also did. Me personally I don't like using a lot of wireless things anyway since they always end up saying everything causes cancer eventually.

Better get out the Aluminum foil then, since we're all bombarded with invisible waves daily. TV, radio, cell phone, laptop, garage door, car keyless remote, GPS, radar, microwave, satellite, OMG!

Your eggs are cooking, but the stove isn't even turned on. Wrap your boys in foil, and your head while you're at it.

That might make Wii Fit Plus uncomfortable to use though...

I'm just funnin' a bit. Good luck with getting a solid connection. If my Wii didn't have a stable feed, I'd be cabling, too. It really is an enhancement to the system to have the connection.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by filecat13 View Post

Wow, I wanted to avoid hard wiring anything since my DSL modem is on the upper level and the Wii and Oppo BDP-83SE are on the lower level, with the main floor in between. That'd be two floors to run cable down, with no attractive way to do it.

Despite my concern about a good signal, the Wii locked onto my wi-fi signal and has never dropped it. Same for the Oppo, which I connected to an Airport Express I had lying around. I'm able to do upgrades without a hitch, and I can access the Web content for both quite painlessly.

I'm running an Apple Airport Extreme, and it seems to cover the whole house and yard with ease. I worry about my little soldiers, though...

Yep - have also considered going wired for the Wii, but considering the rock solid Wi-Fi signal it's getting, I have yet to do so.

Picked up a new Mac over the weekend which has it's WiFi built in - altough it's currently connected to the net via a Powerline connection now (as my old PC was). Considered swapping the Powerline adaptor & moving to close to the Wii, but on the Mac the wired connection is just a hair more reliable (so far).

Have yet to have any real issues w/ Wi-Fi on the Wii, at least since having some phone line/AT&T issues dealt with (I use AT&T DSL service). Games connect quickly & rarely see game killing lag (even on Tatsunoko Vs Capcom), so I will stick w/ WiFi-ing the Wii for now.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
I used AT&T DSL and had constant issues. Then I moved and got comcast and now pretty much same issues.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by BASHERS33 View Post

Someone on another site told me "b" routers are very slow, "g" are decent, and "n" are the ones to get. That's about all I personally know still. And they said be sure to read security instructions. Otherwise I just go on Amazon and read average ratings for the various brands.

Did you folks get all your questions answered related to this already or not?

There are different versions or flavors of 802.11 wireless networking, including 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n. The different flavors are not directly compatible with each other, although many devices support more than one (with "b" and "g" together being a common combination). The most important difference between these technologies is the maximum speed, with 802.11n having the greatest theoretical and practical speed of those listed above.

However, note that both ends of a connection must support the same air interface. The wireless hardware built into the Wii is an 802.11b/g device. As such, it will not run at 802.11n speeds. If one has a dual 802.11n/g router or access point, the Wii will be acting as an 802.11g device. If one has other devices which will make use of an 802.11n network, then by all means, this is the way to go (or if one is looking for "future-proofing"), but it won't make the Wii itself go faster.
post #28 of 28
The built in wifi adpater in the Wii seems to be fairly weak. I usually only get a downstream rate of around 2 mbps from it. The PS3 right next to it is slightly bettter and gets around 3.5 mpbs but is still weak.

My laptop with an n spec wifi adpater can get almost 20 mpbs in the same location. Of course it all depends on the conditions in your home.
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