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Blu-Ray Recorders?

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
I am interested: if anybody has bought the new JVC SR-HD1500us Blu-ray Recorder or the JVC SR-HD1250us?
If so, what can the machine do and what features does it have?
Since jvc has introduced the new Blu-ray Recorders, does anyone expect panasonic to do the same and when?
Thanks for any information.
post #2 of 40
Are these even released in the US?
post #3 of 40
post #4 of 40
post #5 of 40
Hoo, that price is a little bit of a heartstopper.
post #6 of 40
My response is simple. Hauppauge HD PVR. Around $200. Works great.
post #7 of 40
And no inputs other than DV(from camcorders) and S-video/composite Well I guess the SD card slot could be considered a input but nothing to record from say a HD tuner etc. Hollywood must be very happy
Just about what we all expected from a BR recorder
A BR burner in a PC along with a tuner would be cheaper and much more flexible.
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVMARTY View Post

Since jvc has introduced the new Blu-ray Recorders, does anyone expect panasonic to do the same and when?

Panasonic has already produced BD/HDD recorders with tuners, but only for the Australian market so far. The JVCs announced for North America are the typical useless fart-in-the-dark overpriced "prosumer" nonsense, with DRM galore and camcorders as the only possible hi def source material. Perhaps handy for wealthy dilletantes who simply must have their camcorder footage burned to BD, and maybe a few event videographers, but pointless as general-purpose home recorders. Any television/broadcast/cable/satellite input would be standard-def only, not much to be gained burning that on expensive BD media.

Regular ole DVD/HDD recorders may be boring and old hat nowadays, but they're a hell of a lot cheaper and way more suitable for consumer program sources. If you really need high def capability, a home theater PC or a TiVO networked to your PC is miles ahead of any expensive standalone BD recorder. Mfrs are in no hurry to repeat the mistakes they made trying to push DVD recorders at consumers: they've had ample evidence there's no market for a disc recorder in US/Canada at any price, so don't expect affordable BD recorders with tuners anytime soon. HDTV recording is almost certainly going to be limited to cable/satellite PVRs, TiVO and PCs here, while PAL countries may eventually get a few more standalone options.
post #9 of 40
I've been using my Dvico HDTV card for several years now in my PC with many DVD burners and a Blu Ray and it works great.
I usually burn the keepers to AVCHD DVD disks as the blanks are dirt cheap and will hold about 43 minutes of full 1080i/5.1 sound goodness.
I've also added a Western Digital HDTV live media player so I don't have to burn every capture to disk just to watch it.
Now I can hardly wait for the new crop of Cable card PC and settop media boxes so I can continue capturing the TV I'm paying for if I want.
I'd say only people with more money then they know what to do with and no concept of what can be done now would want that thing without any kind of HD tuner in it for that kind of money.
post #10 of 40
Dartman since you burn AVCHD to a standard DVD and get ~43 min.(I've heard than number before) have you ever burned that format to a BR disc? If I do my math correct I figure you should get ~3hrs 50 minutes of the same format on a 25GB SL BR blank. How much time can one record on a standard 25GB SL BR blank using the standard BR format(what's used on a commercial disc)? I assume less(because many commercial discs <2hrs in length are put on 50GB DL discs) but then again maybe not
With the cost of BR discs coming down and 8.5 GB DVD DL discs staying about the same >$1 it might be cheaper to burn on BR vs DVD DL.
post #11 of 40
My Hauppauge HD PVR records in h.264. This is an extremely efficient codec that produces excellent quality with relatively small file sizes.

I can get 2+ hours of HD video and 5.1 AC3 audio on a DL DVD. The recording is indistinguishable from the original.
post #12 of 40
I only have one disk here that came with the burner and I think I did try it and was able to get about 4 1 hour shows on it. Each one is about 4 gig give or take of course and I usually use VideoRedo to edit the down, then MultiAVCHD with Image burn to burn the disks.
I think sometimes my player didn't like the BD-RE disk I made but happily played the single DVD copies of one edited show I made. I have done them to cheap DL disk as well and those also play great.
IF you have the burner and things I'd try a RE disk to make sure your doing it right and your player works with them then you can burn all the native BD disks you want after that but for me DVD blanks are still way cheaper for now, plus I haven't really burned any caps to disk since I got the media player and a 1.5 Terabyte USB external drive
I got tired of all these damned disks laying around and trying to figure out where to store them and whats on them.
post #13 of 40
Thread Starter 
Could someone explain more about the Hauppauge 1212 HD PVR. I understand that it has component inputs to it.
I have some questions about this machine.
1) Can I hook this up directly to my satellite receiver and get High Definition recordings?
2) What are the features and fuctions of what this machine can do?
3) Do I need a computer to use this machine?
4) What can I expect for this machine?

Thanks in advance for any information
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

Dartman since you burn AVCHD to a standard DVD and get ~43 min.(I've heard than number before) have you ever burned that format to a BR disc? If I do my math correct I figure you should get ~3hrs 50 minutes of the same format on a 25GB SL BR blank. How much time can one record on a standard 25GB SL BR blank using the standard BR format(what's used on a commercial disc)? I assume less(because many commercial discs <2hrs in length are put on 50GB DL discs) but then again maybe not
With the cost of BR discs coming down and 8.5 GB DVD DL discs staying about the same >$1 it might be cheaper to burn on BR vs DVD DL.

jjeff, it's the same concept as with DVD-R -- bitrate rules as far as how much you can put on a given disk. AVCHD is a format which has a similar but different file structure compared to BD. It was originally designed for HD camcorders and uses the MPEG-4/ H264 codec, the same as most BluRay movies. It's the file structure that is the difference. Most BD players will play AVCHD on DVD or SD memory card, but expect to see BD format when a BD-R is put in.

Putting ~40 min of HD/5.1 on a DVD-R pretty much applies when you leave the bitrate the same as what comes over the air (or cable, etc.). If you ever get your TiVo connected to your PC you'll see a 1 hr OTA HD show has a file size of 4.5-6.5 GB. Original file size depends a lot on the network -- i.e. ABC and FOX broadcast in 720p with subchannels, so their filesize is generally <5GB with commercials. CBS is a stretch -- they broadcast in 1080i with no subchannels so the filesizes are generally > 6GB with commercials.

Bottom line is you can always use a program like video ReDo to transcode and lower the bitrate to fit however much you want on whatever media you want. The same concerns of bitrate vs. quality apply as they always have. People who recode BluRay movies generally say they don't see much difference when they take a 35GB BD movie and recode to fit on a $3 BD-R (25GB). Eventually I'll find out for myself.
post #15 of 40
Back in 2004 when I shelled out $650 for my first Panny HDD DVDR, the media capabilities of PCs were (to my informed but non-poweruser mind) questionable. Now, I stick with the "old" DVDR technology because I'm comfortable with it, I know how to get exactly what I want from it, the financial investment is already made etc. But ~$1,500-1,800 for an HDD Blu-Ray recorder?? NO WAY! You can get a *really* nice Media PC for that.....and with later-generation software, not to mention support from a place like AVS Forum, taking the Media/HTPC dive makes sense now.

A friend of mine is considering just such a move. He's thinking of investing in a dedicated laptop for his A/V needs. I encouraged him to go for it: think of it as a dedicated music source that can also be used for e-mail, word processing, and surfing the web on the side.
post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by doswonk1 View Post

Back in 2004 when I shelled out $650 for my first Panny HDD DVDR, the media capabilities of PCs were (to my informed but non-poweruser mind) questionable. Now, I stick with the "old" DVDR technology because I'm comfortable with it, I know how to get exactly what I want from it, the financial investment is already made etc.

You may not have to put out too much investment to move to HD. I have the same computer now that I had back in 2004-5 when I bought my Panasonic E-85. It's been fine all these years for editing and burning DVD Video. Now I have a TiVo HD and transfer HD recordings over my network to the same PC. Doing HD editing will tax it quite a bit more, but I have never had a problem letting it run all night and all day, while I'm at work, to do it's thing. There was this one time where I had 7 copies of DVD Shrink simultaneously running, compressing an entire season of a TV series. I started it at 8:00pm and it ran for 22 hr straight. The only investment I really need to make at this point is for a BluRay player and a BD burner. Maybe soon, like this summer.
post #17 of 40
Well just about ANY quad core CPU will half your decoding and crunching time.
I'm using my old AMD 7600 quad and it halved the time it took with my old 4600 dual core, plus it doesn't tax the machine as hard to do it and things just work better and smoother.
If you just don't have the budget but it works slowly and your fine with that more power to you but I think you can find combo mother board and CPU deals pretty cheap and build a new dedicated home theater box.
I usually stay a generation behind the latest cutting edge stuff and get good deals on upgrades that still work great that way.

post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVMARTY View Post

Could someone explain more about the Hauppauge 1212 HD PVR. I understand that it has component inputs to it.
I have some questions about this machine.
1) Can I hook this up directly to my satellite receiver and get High Definition recordings?
2) What are the features and fuctions of what this machine can do?
3) Do I need a computer to use this machine?
4) What can I expect for this machine?

Thanks in advance for any information

There are a couple threads about the HDPVR in the HTPC section.
I'll try to answer your questions:

1. Yes, but you need to use a PC. It's just a video capture device, it does not have a tuner.
2. Hauppauge isn't the best company in the world for driver support/buggy free software, but it does work(I use Win7 x64). Basically you can capture 720p or 1080i video via component video output and 5.1/AC3 audio via optical. It converts the analog HD video(after all, component is analog) to digital, in the H.264 format. There are considerable space savings with H.264/MPEG4 over MPEG2. However there is a little quality loss from the analog to digital conversion. The quality that you capture in is adjustable in the software, the highest quality is pretty close to original, usually it looks a little bit soft. For what it does and it's price point, I find it to be acceptable.
3. See answers to above. Yes you do need a computer.
4. It's one of(if not the only) consumer level/priced devices that can capture 720p/1080i HD(along with the 6 channel audio) via component INPUT. It does have software, you cannot WRITE to Blu-Ray discs without purchasing the full version(Arcsoft Total Media). You can write to regular DVDs and make discs that are compadible with XBOX360 or PS3, or just plain AVCHD discs that play in most BluRay players.

This devices exploits what is called the "analog hole" in that current cable companies/sat providers do not have to encrypt analog outputs on customer devices. HD component output is analog, thus it does not have to be protected, like DVI/HDMI which is protected and cannot be recorded. Hollywood wants nothing more than to shut this hole, and has offered cable companies access to new releases nearly a week after being put in theaters, in exchange for them enabling copy protection on analog outputs of set top boxes. This would render every single HDTV without an HDMI input obsolete, and cause a HUGE uproar.
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ak3883 View Post

There are a couple threads about the HDPVR in the HTPC section.
I'll try to answer your questions:

1. Yes, but you need to use a PC. It's just a video capture device, it does not have a tuner.
2. Hauppauge isn't the best company in the world for driver support/buggy free software, but it does work(I use Win7 x64). Basically you can capture 720p or 1080i video via component video output and 5.1/AC3 audio via optical. It converts the analog HD video(after all, component is analog) to digital, in the H.264 format. There are considerable space savings with H.264/MPEG4 over MPEG2. However there is a little quality loss from the analog to digital conversion. The quality that you capture in is adjustable in the software, the highest quality is pretty close to original, usually it looks a little bit soft. For what it does and it's price point, I find it to be acceptable.
3. See answers to above. Yes you do need a computer.
4. It's one of(if not the only) consumer level/priced devices that can capture 720p/1080i HD(along with the 6 channel audio) via component INPUT. It does have software, you cannot WRITE to Blu-Ray discs without purchasing the full version(Arcsoft Total Media). You can write to regular DVDs and make discs that are compadible with XBOX360 or PS3, or just plain AVCHD discs that play in most BluRay players.

This devices exploits what is called the "analog hole" in that current cable companies/sat providers do not have to encrypt analog outputs on customer devices. HD component output is analog, thus it does not have to be protected, like DVI/HDMI which is protected and cannot be recorded. Hollywood wants nothing more than to shut this hole, and has offered cable companies access to new releases nearly a week after being put in theaters, in exchange for them enabling copy protection on analog outputs of set top boxes. This would render every single HDTV without an HDMI input obsolete, and cause a HUGE uproar.

Good explanation. But allow me to expand a bit.

The Hauppauge HD PVR records to mp4, .ts, or .m2ts files using the h.264 codec. These files can be authored as Blu-ray without purchasing the commercial version of the TME included software. There are a couple of ways to do this. One is to simply use TSmuxer to author. TSmuxer is freeware for non-commercial purposes. You can also use the included TME software and save the project to your hard drive and then use IMGburn to burn to a Blu-ray disc. IMGburn is also freeware. These are just a couple of ways.

In my opinion using a DL DVD works fine. I use my HD PVR to offload HD movies from my satco DVR in real time - there is no subsequent post process timely encoding - it's real time. Most of the files that are saved to my satco DVR are less in file size that what a DL DVD offers. So it is a good fit. Recording at around 8mps constant bit rate produces high quality recordings that at least in my mind are indistinguishable from the original. And they include 5.1 AC3 audio if the source is 5.1 with 2 hours HD video and 5.1 surround fitting fine on a DL DVD.

I use my HD PVR in a very limited way. Simply to record content and I don't use the PVR features. So my approach is very simple and works fine. The threads here on AVS that discuss the HD PVR can be found here:

HD PVR link 1

HD PVR link 2
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dartman View Post

I've been using my Dvico HDTV card for several years now in my PC with many DVD burners and a Blu Ray and it works great.
I usually burn the keepers to AVCHD DVD disks as the blanks are dirt cheap and will hold about 43 minutes of full 1080i/5.1 sound goodness.
I've also added a Western Digital HDTV live media player so I don't have to burn every capture to disk just to watch it.
Now I can hardly wait for the new crop of Cable card PC and settop media boxes so I can continue capturing the TV I'm paying for if I want.
I'd say only people with more money then they know what to do with and no concept of what can be done now would want that thing without any kind of HD tuner in it for that kind of money.

This grabbed my attention. I too have tons of recorded 720p/1080i TS files (via HTPC), and also have some D/L'd 1080p M2TS trailers and clips (M2TS clips contain muxed H264 video and 640kbps Dolby Digital 5.1). I want to be able to play these on my standalone Blu-ray player (Panny DMP-BD35) for viewing on a 50-inch Kuro Elite, but thought I'd have to get a Blu-ray burner to get it done.

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but Dartman, since your AVCHD DVD burns play on your standalone player, I'd like to try this myself. Could you elaborate a bit more on your workflow? I too have Videoredo and Imgburn, but will have to acquire and learn MultiAVCHD. Also, does it matter if you use DVD+R versus DVD-R? Thanks in advance for any additional insight!
post #21 of 40
I was reading an article "Best HDTV's of 2010" here and saw something interesting:

Quote:


Toshiba Regza ZX900 Series Cell TV, $TBA

Technically, Toshiba's Regza Cell TVs haven't hit stores yet, but after previewing them at CES 2010, we think Toshiba has some of the most promising HDTV technology to look forward to this year. Using a Cell processor the same brawny CPU under the hood of Sony's PlayStation 3 the ZX900 can upscale DVD video to HD resolution with better quality, individually lighten and dim 512 LED backlighting zones, and even convert 2D television content to 3D. That's not to mention the built-in 1TB hard drive, Blu-ray recorder, or Net TV for access to Web content like Netflix and Pandora. After watching it side-by-side with last year's superb SV670, there's no question quality has improved, as well. We'll just have to wait and see what Toshiba wants to charge for this beast.
post #22 of 40
Lots of new articles announcing this Toshiba HDTV and all mention the 1TB HDD and a Bluray PLAYER.

Here's one of those articles...

but here's one that mentions its potential price of $11,000 (below the pic).
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlad Theimpaler View Post

This grabbed my attention. I too have tons of recorded 720p/1080i TS files (via HTPC), and also have some D/L'd 1080p M2TS trailers and clips (M2TS clips contain muxed H264 video and 640kbps Dolby Digital 5.1). I want to be able to play these on my standalone Blu-ray player (Panny DMP-BD35) for viewing on a 50-inch Kuro Elite, but thought I'd have to get a Blu-ray burner to get it done.

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but Dartman, since your AVCHD DVD burns play on your standalone player, I'd like to try this myself. Could you elaborate a bit more on your workflow? I too have Videoredo and Imgburn, but will have to acquire and learn MultiAVCHD. Also, does it matter if you use DVD+R versus DVD-R? Thanks in advance for any additional insight!

I use a first gen Panasonic BRD-10a Blu Ray player and it supports AVCHD disks on DVD and I believe Blu ray blanks, many of the newer players also support it now as well but best to double check or do a test disk to make sure as not all do.
1 I edit down my TP captures to MPG with video redo, take out the commercials and whatever else I don't want then rename if needed and save the edits to the hard drive. It will also save them to many other formats but that one seems to be the easiest to deal with for most other programs so depends on what you want to do or which one you think saves the most space.
2 Use MultiAVCHD (Free) to recode if needed, it will recode a bigger file to fit any size of dvd blank you choose and also supports BD and HD-DVD as well if you want to try any of those formats or at least get a BD burner later.
3 when it's done it will automatically fire up image burn and burn the results to a DVD blank for you of whatever size you have chosen.
I have used plus and minus media, and Dual layer and so far if I've set my options properly the results play just like the original file did. I don't think you'll have to redo the bit-setting or anything, just burn as it sets and it should work, though you may have to play around with that if your burns have issues.
For a while I was also burning HD-DVD to regular DVD blanks and it also worked very well, BUT you had to leave the bit-setting to whatever the blanks was, not reset plus media to DVD-ROM, as the Toshiba players were smart enough to recognize the difference and reset the playback pickup properly to play them, if you did reset plus media to DVD-ROM it would skip and have other playback issues.
I have so many disks stuffed everywhere and in boxes that the media player has been very handy to cut down on clutter and I can still burn anything I have to any format I want later if needed.
I know that there is a thread to show you how to do HD-DVD to regular disks, and also BD to regular DVD's on here somewhere and I also believe CD Freaks has one about Blu Ray as well that I looked over and it seems MultiAVCHD is now the easiest and fastest way to get the disks done seeing how you all ready have the other two programs.
There probably are other ways to do it by now but this has worked well and pretty quickly for me so far.
post #24 of 40
are they(Blu Ray recorders) available in Canada yet?
post #25 of 40
Not in Canada yet, and not likely anytime soon.

There has been a lot of forum chat about how Canada still had good DVD/HDD recorders for years after they were pulled from the USA market, but some misunderstand what was behind that or whats going on now. Higher-end recorders were pulled from the States because they were perceived as too expensive, too complex, and didn't sell in enough numbers for mfrs to break even. A few years ago when our brilliant gov't was at the peak of its ATSC misadventure, it insisted all recorders sold from 2006 forward must have ATSC-capable tuners, despite our ATSC transition having been munged, bungled and postponed repeatedly. Recorder mfrs took this as a cue to abandon the US market at the high end, because adding ATSC was going to slap another $100 on top of already-pricey DVD/HDD models.

These recorders were continued in Canada only because Canada's DTV transition was much further off and there was no legislation demanding the ATSC tuners be added years ahead of time. The actual demand for DVD/HDD recorders in Canada was not appreciably higher than in the US, which is why Panasonic walked away only a year after dropping the USA. Pioneer and Sony hung in but were very slow sellers until Pioneer died a painful death in spring 2009- then suddenly there was a run on the final Pioneers and the Pio-derivative Sony 780.

The combined USA/Canada North American market is hopelessly addicted to simplified cable/satellite PVRs and web viewing, whatever remains of the consumer off-air recording market got wiped out when ATSC killed reception for most people- further driving cable/satellite penetration. After seeing what a profitless disaster advanced DVD recorders became, mfrs are in no hurry to devalue BluRay recorders in a doomed effort to sell them here: standalone BD/HDD recorders will likely remain limited to the smaller but profitable Asian, Australian, New Zealand and possibly EU markets which can support an $800+ unit that requires reading an instruction book to operate.
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dartman View Post

I use a first gen Panasonic BRD-10a Blu Ray player and it supports AVCHD disks on DVD and I believe Blu ray blanks, many of the newer players also support it now as well but best to double check or do a test disk to make sure as not all do.
1 I edit down my TP captures to MPG with video redo, take out the commercials and whatever else I don't want then rename if needed and save the edits to the hard drive. It will also save them to many other formats but that one seems to be the easiest to deal with for most other programs so depends on what you want to do or which one you think saves the most space.
2 Use MultiAVCHD (Free) to recode if needed, it will recode a bigger file to fit any size of dvd blank you choose and also supports BD and HD-DVD as well if you want to try any of those formats or at least get a BD burner later.
3 when it's done it will automatically fire up image burn and burn the results to a DVD blank for you of whatever size you have chosen.
I have used plus and minus media, and Dual layer and so far if I've set my options properly the results play just like the original file did. I don't think you'll have to redo the bit-setting or anything, just burn as it sets and it should work, though you may have to play around with that if your burns have issues.
For a while I was also burning HD-DVD to regular DVD blanks and it also worked very well, BUT you had to leave the bit-setting to whatever the blanks was, not reset plus media to DVD-ROM, as the Toshiba players were smart enough to recognize the difference and reset the playback pickup properly to play them, if you did reset plus media to DVD-ROM it would skip and have other playback issues.
I have so many disks stuffed everywhere and in boxes that the media player has been very handy to cut down on clutter and I can still burn anything I have to any format I want later if needed.
I know that there is a thread to show you how to do HD-DVD to regular disks, and also BD to regular DVD's on here somewhere and I also believe CD Freaks has one about Blu Ray as well that I looked over and it seems MultiAVCHD is now the easiest and fastest way to get the disks done seeing how you all ready have the other two programs.
There probably are other ways to do it by now but this has worked well and pretty quickly for me so far.

Thanks, Dartman. Did LOTS of reading about AVCHD, and I will have a problem with the 1080p H.264 trailers, because AVCHD on DVD+/-R is limited to 18Mbps bitrate. The 1080i/720p OTA TS recordings (HD MPEG2) via ATSC tuners will fall within that limit, however.

I'm now experimenting with MultiAVCHD to create a AVCHD compliant authoring structure of the 1080p H.264 trailers, to write to a SDHC memory card. AVCHD on SD media can have 24Mbps bitrate, so I think the trailers will be fine without transcoding (which I want to avoid).

Thanks for the feedback. I'll definitely be trying out AVCHD on DVDR for archiving recorded 1080i/720p HD TS files, so I do appreciate your response!
post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ak3883 View Post

There are a couple threads about the HDPVR in the HTPC section.
I'll try to answer your questions:

1. Yes, but you need to use a PC. It's just a video capture device, it does not have a tuner.
2. Hauppauge isn't the best company in the world for driver support/buggy free software, but it does work(I use Win7 x64). Basically you can capture 720p or 1080i video via component video output and 5.1/AC3 audio via optical. It converts the analog HD video(after all, component is analog) to digital, in the H.264 format. There are considerable space savings with H.264/MPEG4 over MPEG2. However there is a little quality loss from the analog to digital conversion. The quality that you capture in is adjustable in the software, the highest quality is pretty close to original, usually it looks a little bit soft. For what it does and it's price point, I find it to be acceptable.
3. See answers to above. Yes you do need a computer.
4. It's one of(if not the only) consumer level/priced devices that can capture 720p/1080i HD(along with the 6 channel audio) via component INPUT. It does have software, you cannot WRITE to Blu-Ray discs without purchasing the full version(Arcsoft Total Media). You can write to regular DVDs and make discs that are compadible with XBOX360 or PS3, or just plain AVCHD discs that play in most BluRay players.

This devices exploits what is called the "analog hole" in that current cable companies/sat providers do not have to encrypt analog outputs on customer devices. HD component output is analog, thus it does not have to be protected, like DVI/HDMI which is protected and cannot be recorded. Hollywood wants nothing more than to shut this hole, and has offered cable companies access to new releases nearly a week after being put in theaters, in exchange for them enabling copy protection on analog outputs of set top boxes. This would render every single HDTV without an HDMI input obsolete, and cause a HUGE uproar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nextoo View Post

Good explanation. But allow me to expand a bit.

The Hauppauge HD PVR records to mp4, .ts, or .m2ts files using the h.264 codec. These files can be authored as Blu-ray without purchasing the commercial version of the TME included software. There are a couple of ways to do this. One is to simply use TSmuxer to author. TSmuxer is freeware for non-commercial purposes. You can also use the included TME software and save the project to your hard drive and then use IMGburn to burn to a Blu-ray disc. IMGburn is also freeware. These are just a couple of ways.

In my opinion using a DL DVD works fine. I use my HD PVR to offload HD movies from my satco DVR in real time - there is no subsequent post process timely encoding - it's real time. Most of the files that are saved to my satco DVR are less in file size that what a DL DVD offers. So it is a good fit. Recording at around 8mps constant bit rate produces high quality recordings that at least in my mind are indistinguishable from the original. And they include 5.1 AC3 audio if the source is 5.1 with 2 hours HD video and 5.1 surround fitting fine on a DL DVD.

I use my HD PVR in a very limited way. Simply to record content and I don't use the PVR features. So my approach is very simple and works fine. The threads here on AVS that discuss the HD PVR can be found here:

HD PVR link 1

HD PVR link 2

Questions for all.......

I've owned a Panasonic DMR-EH75V DVD Recorder/80 GB Hard Drive for the last 3 years & does exactly what I need it to do, which is recording, editing & burning SD DVDs, but I'm ready to move up to recording HD, editing & burning on to Blu-Ray DVDs.

A slight quirk in what & how I record however...I record my team's college football games, BUT I use my Onkyo receiver's RCA Audio Outputs (set on FM Tuner of course) as my audio source. I prefer my team's announcers as opposed to the TV Network's. In-line, I also use an audio delay device to sync the audio with the video. So my audio MUST come via RCA Outputs & MUST be separate from my video source. I'm only using my video source for video.

I use a Dish Network 722 HD DVR as my video source. Of course, most of my feeds will come from ESPN & CBS.

So my questions are...what devices & software do I need?

1. Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR?
2. TV Tuner card (brand & model)? Appears to not be necessary using the Hauppauge since it uses its USB output.
3. Blu-Ray burner (brand & model)? Can the format that the Hauppauge produces be used to burn to a Blu-Ray DVD?
4. Editing software (brand & model)? TSmuxer seem to be the best?
5. Blu-Ray burning software (brand & model)? IMGburn seem to be the best? Or is only standard DVD-R discs recommended?


As for my current PC, it's an Intel 2.0G dual core with a 160G hard drive...running XP 64-bit. Will my current PC + a 2.0 USB 1-2 Terabyte Hard Drive suffice? Or should I purchase a new PC with beefier components & an internal hard drive for better speed (vs. a USB hard drive)?

Ultimately, my biggest question is...will I be able to mix & record a HD video signal with an external audio source? It appears the Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR can achieve this since it has separate video & audio inputs. Is this accurate?
post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringmaster316 View Post

are they(Blu Ray recorders) available in Canada yet?

Yes, you can purchase the two JVC Blu-ray recorders mentioned in this thread SR-HD1250US and SR-HD1500US from a Canadian JVC-Professional authorized dealer. Consumer Electronic stores do not carry the units but professional-gear dealers do.
post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by rscotta831 View Post

Questions for all.......


So my questions are...what devices & software do I need?

1. Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR?
2. TV Tuner card (brand & model)? Appears to not be necessary using the Hauppauge since it uses its USB output.
3. Blu-Ray burner (brand & model)? Can the format that the Hauppauge produces be used to burn to a Blu-Ray DVD?
4. Editing software (brand & model)? TSmuxer seem to be the best?
5. Blu-Ray burning software (brand & model)? IMGburn seem to be the best? Or is only standard DVD-R discs recommended?


As for my current PC, it's an Intel 2.0G dual core with a 160G hard drive...running XP 64-bit. Will my current PC + a 2.0 USB 1-2 Terabyte Hard Drive suffice? Or should I purchase a new PC with beefier components & an internal hard drive for better speed (vs. a USB hard drive)?

Ultimately, my biggest question is...will I be able to mix & record a HD video signal with an external audio source? It appears the Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR can achieve this since it has separate video & audio inputs. Is this accurate?

To answer your big question: YES. In the capture software that comes with the HD-PVR, you can select analog audio inputs or optical audio input to the box, with the component video input.

I don't use IMGBurn or TSMuxer so others would have to answer your questions about those, but I believe you can burn BluRay discs with IMGBurn.

To answer question 2, you do NOT need a TV tuner card. The HD-PVR just records what it is fed, from your audio and video source(s), and of course sends it to the computer via USB.

You don't need that powerful of a PC to capture. Playback of the .TS files requires a bit more powerful PC. Your CPU sounds fine, so long as you have 1GB of memory to be safe.
post #30 of 40
Thanks for the help!

Another question...I want to be able to burn both DVDs for Blu-Ray players AND standard DVD players as I'll want to share my football games with friends & family, but not everyone will have Blu-Ray players. Will I be able to use the same .TS file to burn for both types of DVD players? If so, how do I accomplish this? If not, what's the solution?
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