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Need Subwoofer advice

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
First something about me and my system... I'm an organist and therefor I'm looking for a subwoofer which can deliver the bass freq. of the pipe organ very well. I'm also looking for subwoofer which is good for movies. I'm probably 70% music and 30% movie guy.

Now, I have been researching both online and also locally... what I can get locally is these sub brands:

JBL (thinking about L8400p)
Paradigm (thinking about DSP-3200/3400 or SUB12)
Jamo
Martin Logan

Has anyone owned or heared both JBL and Paradigm? There are very few reviews and comments about that JBL subwoofer and also rather little about the Paradigm DSP series also.

Online I have been in touch with SVS regarding their PB12-Plus and PB12-NSD, the PB10-NSD is probably to small?

My current room is about w3,5 (11,5') x l4,5 (15') x h2,6 (8,5') meters but I look at this as an long-term investment so it will need be able to go with me in larger room or smaller room. I'm renting.

My main speakers are Genelec 8040a

Thanks in advance for your help!
post #2 of 9
People in this forum like the Paradigms. The Hsu may be less expensive than some of the others you listed.

Review on JBL L8400p from several years ago.

http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/spe...er-system.html

The L8400P subwoofer's bass limits were measured with it set to maximum bandwidth and placed in the optimal corner of a 7,500-cubic-foot room. In a smaller room users can expect 2 to 3 Hz deeper extension and up to 3 dB higher sound-pressure level (SPL). The L8400P had 109 to 112 dB SPL capability from 50 to 62 Hz at 2 meters (the optimal seating distance from a subwoofer). But output fell at nearly 16 dB per octave below 50 Hz. And although it had useful response up to 145 Hz when the LFE input was used, upper-frequency bandwidth was more limited with the Normal inputs selected than the dial markings or specifications suggest. There was also a moderate (-4-dB) crossover/level-control interaction over the full range of the crossover control as the selected frequency was lowered.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
I actually just returned from a visit to one of my local audio shop and had some demo on the JBL sub and it sounded quite tight and went pretty low in my ears. However, I don't have experience from other subs than some cheap PC junk.

wwinkler, 16db per octave sounds like a lot drop.
post #4 of 9
For extension, you will have to buy internet direct subs. One exception is the Deftech Trinity, which was designed to reproduce deep organ tones. That is a fairly expensive sub though, but you can find used ones for $2k sometimes. If that is more than you are looking to spend, a good deal out there right now is the Outlaw Audio LFM-1 EX while it is on sale. Hsu is also good, they come with a demo disc with some deep organ music, and the sub does impressively with that material. Elemental Designs will also have some real low frequency beasts, they are definitely worth looking at.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
thanks shadyJ... unfortunatly it seems that Outlaw Audio doesn't ship internationally - I'm in Iceland.
post #6 of 9
That is unfortunate.

I've owned Paradigm, Hsu and definitive and currently own an outlaw audio. The outlaw audio is great sub and in my opinion better than the deftech super cubes.
post #7 of 9
Rythmik would be my first pick with HSU a close second. Rythmik subs are sealed, but dig pretty deep. It won't have the output of a ported design so it depends how loud you typically listen to material. It also may have more trouble than a ported design if you move to a larger room. Decisions, decisions...
post #8 of 9
To help evaluate subwoofers, it helps to have reasonably objective specifications. I found the Sound&Vision review quite useful (it was on the L-series JBLs). I have the same L-series regular speakers as in the review and seriously considered the L8400P. The predecessor JBL S120PII subwoofer was quite favorably reviewed in Sound&Vision.

The Polk 505 subwoofer is another that I considered purchasing. Individuals in this forum have given it quite favorable reviews but not based on head-to-head listening comparison with other subwoofers that are reasonably highly regarded by a substantial number of individuals in this forum.

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...er-4-2005.html

Subjective evaluations where an individual has one subwoofer (such as the BIC F12) and upgrades to the Hsu STF-2 or eD A2-300 can be helpful (particularly if several individuals have done similar upgrades).

If more individuals had test equipment (such as happens in the DIY forum), then it is relatively easy to get more objective reviews. Of course, subwoofer response is particularly dependent on the room and location in the room.

Objective measure measurements require a suitable soundcard in a PC (usually laptop) and can be external that connect via USB. The Radio Shack microphone is quite inexpensive (and widely used). The REW software for doing the curves, etc. is freely downloadable. If you already have a suitable soundcard, then the microphone is less than $100. Many suitable soundcards (even external USB) are under $50.
post #9 of 9
To help evaluate subwoofers, it helps to have reasonably objective specifications. I found the Sound&Vision review quite useful (it was on the L-series JBLs). I have the same L-series regular speakers as in the review and seriously considered the L8400P. The predecessor JBL S120PII subwoofer was quite favorably reviewed in Sound&Vision.

The Polk 505 subwoofer is another that I considered purchasing. Individuals in this forum have given it quite favorable reviews but not based on head-to-head listening comparison with other subwoofers that are reasonably highly regarded by a substantial number of individuals in this forum.

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...er-4-2005.html

Subjective evaluations where an individual has one subwoofer (such as the BIC F12) and upgrades to the Hsu STF-2 or eD A2-300 can be helpful (particularly if several individuals have done similar upgrades).

If more individuals had test equipment (such as happens in the DIY forum), then it is relatively easy to get more objective reviews. Of course, subwoofer response is particularly dependent on the room and location in the room.

Objective measure measurements require a suitable soundcard in a PC (usually laptop) and can be external that connect via USB. The Radio Shack microphone is quite inexpensive (and widely used). The REW software for doing the curves, etc. is freely downloadable. If you already have a suitable soundcard, then the microphone is less than $100. Many suitable soundcards (even external USB) are under $50.
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