or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › sharp quattron is it marketing gimmick? I think so
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

sharp quattron is it marketing gimmick? I think so

post #1 of 199
Thread Starter 
ok so the colorspace of the quattron is rgby well what good is that if movies and games are all made with rgb?
post #2 of 199
The color spectrum is far more than RGB just study the print and publishing industry where it's capability is expanded through 4-6 color print or open your eyes and view a color wheel and it's vast shades. This isn't the first time it's been used with TV and it's not the end as Sharp has hinted at expanding it even further in the future. Mits RPTV's went past RGB.

It takes the processing from Billions to Trillions and the processing expands that not just the color source. Now, I agree we must await the results for some professional ISF calibration testing and real feedback to determine if it's the real deal or Fluff. The concept is widely used successfully in the print and publishing industry and so who's to say it won't work with HDTV. I have a color laser printer outside my office that is Magenta, Cyan, Yellow, and Kuro "CMYK" and many print shops and higher end Inkjets are doing 6 color blends RGB is one shade of each otherwise how can processing expand to the Billions/Trillions of variations?

The color spectrum results should be excellent based upon past tests with the XS1 Sharp which easily exceeded 100%. I'll reserve judgement until witnessing the real deal since I've seen it work successfully in print and publishing and other technical mediums. If we had no room for improvement of RGB then how could one explain the striking eye popping Samsungs which dominate - they all start with RGB but it's how it's processed and packaged that counts - perfect example was a mid range Samsung C6500 next to an LG LH40 at BB and the Samsung destroyed the LG in every respect yet they both use RGB.

Also, this isn't the first time Sharp has done something like this --- my 57" and 65" high end Sharps debuted with a five wave color filter to improve RED's and Green's and I can attest that the first thing I noticed when upgrading to this model were how outstanding the REDS were and without any PUSH whatsoever and the greens are great and natural but damn the REDS were a striking improvement with the Five Wave Color Filters implemented 3.5 yrs ago and which none of the current budget Sharps have as it's cost is higher. To me this is just another way to provide wider color spectrum without the higher costs and they need something to compete with Samsung eye popping panels. They succeeded with that Technology so I'll give them the benefit of the doubt with Quattron until I can do a personal audition to decide between the 68" Sharp or the 65" Samsung C8000.

Our visible Spectrum includes these even though Yellow and Purple is not in RGB without blending it's a blend that we see - Sharp is manipulating subpixels to add Yellow to the mix.

RGB Colors - When converted to HDTV and processing it doesn't mean your simply stuck on RGB as your colors - Sharp is doing a blend by manipulating the subpixels and we'll see if it truly works soon.

Color Gamut Chart
post #3 of 199
Thread Starter 
yeah all the other companys manipulate rgb pixels to make all the colors i dont see how you can just add yellow when yellow can easily be made from rgb I dont know just doesnt add up to me.
post #4 of 199
#1. There is no content available that supports Quatron period.
#2. No one can distinguish between a standard LCD TV or a Quatron TV
#3. One of the main functions of an LCD Display is to be used for PS3 and Xbox 360 Gaming, who knows what Input Lag this Quatron hype will add to that.
#4. How does Quatron help Black levels?
#5. One of the Biggest problems with LCD's is Fast Moving Objects and Motion.So how does Quatron help that?? Are they using IPS Panels??
#6. I am just gonna wait for OLED HDTV's then 3D OLED TV having seen the 11 inch Sony OLED in stores, that is image perfection. And they use like no power.

And plus giving how expensive its been, Its very unlikely SHARP is using individually colored LED lights everyone has switched back to just White LED's and given up on Red Green and Blue colored LED's. I wonder are the SHARP Quatrons' Edge Lite or LED Back Lit with Local Dimming???

Given how expensive a SHARP Quatron is expected to be, why not invest in a 3D HDTV??

- problem is none of the 3D TV's come equipped with the 2D to 3D broadcast tuners to convert 2D to 3D, and are only "3D Ready" remember the whole "HD Ready" scam vs HD Built in its back now with 3D.
post #5 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post

The color spectrum is far more than RGB just study the print and publishing industry where it's capability is expanded through 4-6 color print or open your eyes and view a color wheel and it's vast shades. This isn't the first time it's been used with TV and it's not the end as Sharp has hinted at expanding it even further in the future. Mits RPTV's went past RGB.

The color spectrum is more than RGB, but your eyes only have red, green, and blue receptors to perceive it, and the signal being decoded by the television only contains red, green, and blue components.

Printer technology is very different than video technology because printers mix basic colors with dithering. The larger the color palette available for dithering the better the result at any given resolution.

I haven't seen it yet. It would be hard to believe they would develop the technology and spend so much money urging people to go see it if it didn't produce a better image. But the ads are definitely misleading when they imply that there are colors which can't be reproduced with only RGB pixels.
post #6 of 199
"Features" allow sets to be sold at a premium. Sharp is marketing here, same as Mitsubishi did with their 6 color wheel in their DLP sets. No visual difference in picture.

Others have done this and continue to do so. 720 to 1080 sets - in a blind test nobody could pick the 1080 set. 120 to 240 hz sets - again, no visual difference except on your credit card statement from buying one.
post #7 of 199
The only thing I could think of this benefiting is overall brightness after calibration. I'm not even sure this would work using yellow, but it sounds like a possibility. In stores, the TV sets are usually set to brightest mode which ends up making the picture very bluish. If you look at the sharp set, the color temperature could be much closer to 6500K at the same brightness. In a side-by-side comparison in the store, a 6500K set of the same brightness would definitely stand out as more natural colors next to the way-too-blue sets.

So sharp says in their commercial, you have to see it, and when people go to the store the set colors look a lot better next to the worse-calibrated sets, and people think 'wow, I must buy this one.'
post #8 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbillen View Post

Printer technology is very different than video technology because printers mix basic colors with dithering.

Print color output is different than screen color output because of one huge reason: print is subtractive output, while a light source like a monitor or the sun is additive output.

http://www.sparklenet.com/1_Main_Str...ubtractive.htm

In print, the color mixtures are what you would expect: Yellow and red make orange (although printers generally use cyan, magenta and K "black", the idea and graphics illustrate the point good enough). On the screen, it's quite different: red + green = yellow. If you add all the colors together in RGB, you get white. You can see this when sunlight hits a prism.

Subtractive (print):




Additive (screens and white light sources):




The idea, and I hope this turns out to be the breakthrough I want it to be, is that each r, g, b, and y pixel can can play more to its individual strength. Red and green no longer have to combine at less than 100% brightness to make yellow - the yellow pixel just turns on instead! This could, theoretically, create much more vivid colors.

Although the print process is subtractive, there is a basis for comparison purposes in the print world. While CMYK is a basic 4 color process, there are also 6 color processes (CMYK, plus orange and green), and even an 8 color process! The office I work in has a full time print designer, and she was always trying to go beyond the 4 color print process if the budget allowed. And believe me, when she got her way, things REALLY popped.

I hope - I really, really hope - that these TVs produce a color effect that is noticeably better - similar to the visible increase in quality in the print world when adding more colors and inks. Combined with the new, higher contrast screen, these Sharps could be really sweet.

Or it could be yet another good looking TV.

I really want to see one in person and read some reviews. I'm ready to upgrade if it's a nice enough screen!
post #9 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by aydu View Post

... - again, no visual difference except on your credit card statement from buying one.

l o fricken" l
post #10 of 199
Westa and Venkman, thank you for your beautiful diagrams. Except maybe Venkman's subtractive chart which looks like it came straight from Sir Isaac Newton in the 1700s. Hey, I love ROY G. BIV too...but ever since the discovery was made that humans are trichromatic, the standard has been a subtractive CMY combination...not RBY.

However, the simple fact remains that our eyes are only capable of seeing 3 colors; red, green and blue. To be clear, that means that our eyes cannot see 'cyan'. 'Cyan' is only our brains interpretation of getting signals from both the 'green' color receptors and the 'blue' color receptors at the same time. Unless human genetics change giving us 4 dimensional color vision, there will never be a benefit to adding a fourth color to the additive primary colors.

There was another comment regarding additional colors (6 colors) being used for print. Print unfortunately lacks from the color depth ability of an LCD monitor. While a pixel on a computer monitor can be variably adjusted in brightness to give up to 256 gradients, a dot of ink on page only has 2 levels; off and on. This lack of color depth can frequently be enhanced by dithering(thank you dbillen for pointing this out). Unfortunately, a CMY system only has three options when laying down a dot of ink; subtract all green, subtract all blue, or subtract all red. Adding additional colors to the print process, specifically red (subtracting green/blue), green (subtracting red/blue), and blue (subtracting red/green) can be the very effective when distributed through an image to add depth to color (dithering).
post #11 of 199
Black performance and Contrast Ratio is more important as a Image Quality factor than a hyped quad subpixels.

Pioneer Kuro or Elite Kuro, why do they look so good and punchy and pop? because they have awesome deep black with many black gradations.

without deep black no images will look good but washed out.

for example:

HDTV-A with 0.001cd/m2 black with RGB subpixels vs HDTV-B 0.5cd/m2 black with RGB+Y subpixels
HDTV-A will destroy HDTV-B easily and I doubt u can see any benefit from the additional Y subpixels.
post #12 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas78 View Post

...However, the simple fact remains that our eyes are only capable of seeing 3 colors; red, green and blue. To be clear, that means that our eyes cannot see 'cyan'. 'Cyan' is only our brains interpretation of getting signals from both the 'green' color receptors and the 'blue' color receptors at the same time. Unless human genetics change giving us 4 dimensional color vision, there will never be a benefit to adding a fourth color to the additive primary colors...

Veritas,

There is one slight flaw in your reasoning. You are looking at this solely from the input side. You aren't thinking about the output. If this new RGBY output can display a larger gamut of color (or if not larger, then at least more accurate), we will notice this even though we input in RGB. garbage in garbage out & whatnot

Look at the diagram on this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamut

The gamut of colors reproducible in RGB has a very small yellow pallet. Also notice the huge gray area of colors NOT reproducible using RGB. Adding yellow would include colors currently outside of the RGB gamut.

HOWEVER... it still remains to be seen whether or not it does improve the output for us to input Can our eyes detect this? I think so, but not as dramatically as George Takei would have you believe I think the difference would be so subtle that you would think the picture does look better but not be able to say exactly why know what I mean?
post #13 of 199
Billbo, thank you for the good point about gamut. However, in the link you provided, you might find some insightful information in the Comparison of various systems'. Technically speaking, a red pixel on an LCD panel does not emit' red light, but instead subtracts green and blue from the backlighting. That means that a screens gamut is limited to the gamut of the backlight. Most of the gamut increase with the quattron will be the use of LED backlighting instead of the common CCFL backlighting which provides a smaller gamut. Unless this new yellow pixel is not subtracting a part of the gamut orthogonal to what is subtracted from green or red, this would still be pointless. I have seen nothing yet to indicate that, but I will continue looking.
post #14 of 199
Wake me up when the 3D QUATTRON is released next year and all the buyers left feeling salty.

If SHARP is such a "leader" wheres the SHARP 3D HDTV?? why are they 1 year or generation behind some might says 2 years behind.
post #15 of 199
Unless the source is captured in "quattron" then it would seem it's all hype. Kinda like saying scaled SD-DVDs look like HD, i.e. if it's not in the source and you "make it up", how can you objectively say it's better? Give me a panel that looks the same in a dark room when it's powered off as it does when displaying "black".

larry
post #16 of 199
It is true that colors are mixtures of basic RGB colors and our visual system has receptors just for the RGB. However vision is quite complicated process. First, visual receptors have broad characteristics, they are not excited only by a narrow band of light wavelengths. Second, red and green receptor bands overlap quite much and to deal with this problem, visual system works by producing differences of signals from color receptors.

Where this leads us is the question: which color is most difficult to reproduce visually with RGB light sources? The answer is yellow because it is just between the red and green which overlap much. Add to this that it is easier to obtain pure high intensity colors by producing their specifiic wavelength of light. Look at the ilumination by a laser source to see this.

From these reasons Sharp Quattron is not a bad idea *for high-end color reproduction* even if the underlying colors are represented by RGB sources. BUT this makes really sense only if Sharp panels would be otherwise perfect and the price is right.
post #17 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

Unless the source is captured in "quattron" then it would seem it's all hype. Kinda like saying scaled SD-DVDs look like HD, i.e. if it's not in the source and you "make it up", how can you objectively say it's better? Give me a panel that looks the same in a dark room when it's powered off as it does when displaying "black".

larry


Exactly my thinking.


Which makes me think about $2,500 HP Dream Color 24 inch IPS LCD's which have 30-bit color panels etc or EIZO LCD's which costs $4,000 bucks and cover like 150% of the NTSC color gamut. And use RGB LED backlights.


Why isn't the SHARP Quattron then capable of such high NTSC Color Gamy coverage?

Why haven't they used Quattrons in high end "Medical Imaging LCD's" which cost $5,000 because the color accuracy must be so huge and perfect because its life and death.


Does Quattron even use Local dimming??

And Does Quattron even use RGB LED back lighting?


And processing for an extra "yellow" sub pixel That must add input lag for PS3 and Xbox 360 Gaming is my guess.

Lets wait and see


Who knows Quattrons may end up being proven to be vastly superior and a year from now we will all be Scrambling to find one. Like so many people are scrambling to find the Samsung B8500.

Quattrons may end up being some kind of rare highly saught after displays because of that extra yellow subpixel and instead of PIXAR and Disney Artists having to spend $2,500 on an HP Dream Color LCD , or Hospitals spending $5,000 on a NEC or EIZO Medical imaging LCD.

They can both drive down to the local Best Buy and get a 40 inch Quattron for $1,500.

I remain skeptical unitl Side by side test are done on equally well calibrated LED LCD's Plasmas vs equally well calibrated Quattrons.

My guess is there will be no difference to the human eye.
post #18 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold View Post

Which makes me think about $2,500 HP Dream Color 24 inch IPS LCD's which have 30-bit color panels etc or EIZO LCD's which costs $4,000 bucks and cover like 150% of the NTSC color gamut. And use RGB LED backlights. Why isn't the SHARP Quattron then capable of such high NTSC Color Gamy coverage?
Why haven't they used Quattrons in high end "Medical Imaging LCD's" which cost $5,000 because the color accuracy must be so huge and perfect because its life and death.

This is totally different market for professional applications, a niche market.
There is no evidence Sharp is targeting this market, they built new factory
for big displays. However, one can easily see they could license the technology to high-end monitor manufacturers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold View Post

And Does Quattron even use RGB LED back lighting?

Would not be more logical to talk about RGBY backlight for Quattron?
Yellow subppixel would get its own yellow backlight. RGB backlight went out of favor, apparently due to the fact is does not bring anything to attract consumers, except of small band of puritans

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold View Post

And processing for an extra "yellow" sub pixel That must add input lag for PS3 and Xbox 360 Gaming is my guess.

Definitely not, generating yellow is pixel-based operation, does not require storing pictures in memory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold View Post

I remain skeptical unitl Side by side test are done on equally well calibrated LED LCD's Plasmas vs equally well calibrated Quattrons.
My guess is there will be no difference to the human eye.

Scepticism is healthy here. There are many more issues in LCD panels to be solved before thinking about yellow. That includes clouding, black levels, flashlights, gamma curve, color calibration. Provided these things are perfected, the yellow subpixel could be a cream on the top. Otherwise a panel without yellow may show overall better colors. It will be interesting to see the performance of Quattron in the top 68" model from Sharp comparing to other high-end sets. If it is not positively distinct from them it will mean the concept is not worth attention.
post #19 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold View Post

#1. There is no content available that supports Quatron period.
#2. No one can distinguish between a standard LCD TV or a Quatron TV
#3. One of the main functions of an LCD Display is to be used for PS3 and Xbox 360 Gaming, who knows what Input Lag this Quatron hype will add to that.
#4. How does Quatron help Black levels?
#5. One of the Biggest problems with LCD's is Fast Moving Objects and Motion.So how does Quatron help that?? Are they using IPS Panels??
#6. I am just gonna wait for OLED HDTV's then 3D OLED TV having seen the 11 inch Sony OLED in stores, that is image perfection. And they use like no power.

And plus giving how expensive its been, Its very unlikely SHARP is using individually colored LED lights everyone has switched back to just White LED's and given up on Red Green and Blue colored LED's. I wonder are the SHARP Quatrons' Edge Lite or LED Back Lit with Local Dimming???

Given how expensive a SHARP Quatron is expected to be, why not invest in a 3D HDTV??

- problem is none of the 3D TV's come equipped with the 2D to 3D broadcast tuners to convert 2D to 3D, and are only "3D Ready" remember the whole "HD Ready" scam vs HD Built in its back now with 3D.


#0 there is no such thing encoded in RGB, RGB is not a colorspace, people probably mean to say sRGB/REC.709

#1 well it is true that movies are encoded on disc (bluray) with REC 709/sRGB colorspace and they simply were not encoded in a larger space such as AdobeRGB, ProPhoto, etc. and if you simply transform the sRGB RGB primaries out the corners of say AdobeRGB you will end up something not right for sure.

BUT

1. if you use it to view photographs you took with you Canon 1D4 then that content might very well be able to make use of the Quatron and that is something that goes on all the time today

2. many current HDTV, even the best ones, still don't quite manage to match all of the ideal sRGB/REC.709 aspects and there may be finer irregularities and such, there is always some chance that this set might be able to really, really nail every last bit, although it is hard to say, and some sets already don't do too badly and it also may be very hard to calibrate, i[m almost certain my high-end calibration puck wouldn't even work with it all.

3. the visual system is complicated and it is always possible that this could make even the sRGB gamut look more like we'd ideally want to actually see it, i dont know the details but perhaps there are certain pure color holes in our ability to see it as generated by RGB only, i'd have to look into it more

#2 it's possible they might, although it might take looking at something the wrong way or a computer image, hard to say

#3 no idea

#4 they said something about the LCD crystal twist and so on and 20% more closed down, if not hype, that would help, but who knows what the starting point was

#5 no idea

#6 should be amazing if only they ever arrive at larger than 2nm screen size and last longer than 3 days

one day though, seemingly not quite as soon as I had originally thought, these beast should utterly blow any current set out of the water though




anyway one can't naively just write it off, that said there certain are plenty of things to question



and yeah contrast ratio is a truly key spec
post #20 of 199
How much of a visual difference from the LC60E77UM vs. the top notch Sharp model such as the XS1 in the 65" category or the above that you Quattron tech. you guys mention?

I know it's not a linear comparison, but for that extra 5", I'm seeing a price difference of a min. of $8K. between XS1 vs. LC60E77UM

So the question is, compares the LC60E77UN for $2K vs. the XS1 for $10K, is there such a noticeable visual difference? What do I really gain? and is the gain remotely worth $8K? I was thinking of saving money for the XS1, but if I can't really tell the difference, the 77UN is at a very attractive price pt. right now.

The other thing is, the warranty is only 1 yr. A friend of mine bought a Sony WEGA LCD TV, just a small 15" or so about 5 yr. ago. As of last year, there is no blue any more.

I bought 2 x 30" Samsung 305T, and in 1.5 yr., both 305T needs warranty replacement. And the replacement model that arrives is also toasted.

So for all the $$ put in to these high end models from various brand name, if I don't get at least 10 to 20 yr. out of it, then it's not worth the $$ spent. What if the XS1 or any Quattron model needs a $2K repair 2 yr. down the road?

By contrast, the TV I bought back in 1992 still works.
post #21 of 199
I am looking forward to seeing one of these new Sharp tv's in person. I am curious to find out if this quad color technology actually is noticable and worth the premium over a standard LCD.
post #22 of 199
post #23 of 199
Video is only following audio's lead. Audio marketing 5.1, 7.1, 9.1, and 11.1 So if that is making cash flow for audio. Sharp is doing the same their way. Overall its a step in the right direction. Do we really need it, vote with your check book.
post #24 of 199
I was not referring to industry's push to get more audio channels, more cabling, more speaker boxes - but increase in audio quality that becomes possible by higher sampling rates and bit depth.

Same applies to Sharp Quattron - they introduced yellow pixel only... (I think there's more to it than just yellow pixel, as per my previous post)

Boky
post #25 of 199
This TV is plainly a gimmick for a few reasons:

A) The primary colors for light are only red, green, and blue. For paint, ink, etc... the primary colors are red, blue, and yellow. I imagine that this is one of the ways this TV will confuse people.
B) HDTV is going to distribute digital signals quite simply in digital values for the intensity of red, green, and blue. The intensity is (2^8)(2^8)(2^8) (or #000000 - #FFFFFF, with the first two characters of that hexadecimal numeration representing the intensity of RGB, respectively). Throwing in a yellow pixel will do very little other than increase the potential for pixelation (normally a pixel contains three small LEDs or liquid crystals - in this TV it'll have four, increasing pixel size by 33% What do we have when the yellow pixel is not in use ? A black spot of course. The difference is [RGB] [RGBY].
- Let it be said that HD is in and of itself a gimmick unless you have a small screen. For example, my laptop with a 14" screen, is effectively 1080p (the p is for vertical pixels). If you have a 26" screen, you still have *only* 1080 pixels vertically (at least that's the max resolution of HDTV). If you have a 40" screen, regretfully you still have the same resolution, just larger pixels. To prove this, go to any electronics store and compare the small quality HDTV picture with those on the large units - the large units look horrible. One theoretical advantage of analog TV is that each pixel (still RGB) could represent more than one color. I.e. - a single HDTV pixel is exactly one color, the color value at the top of each pixel is exactly the same as the color at the bottom of the pixel. On an analog set, the top of a single pixel could be black, for example, while the bottom half was a different color. Analog will always have capabilities exceeding digital - the problem is the transmission medium.

I'm often discouraged to people stand next to their new $1200 40" HDTV's, which look like crap and have horrible pixelation, raving on how "detailed" it is. Pigs, sheep, and dogs - that's all we are.
post #26 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by happy hopping View Post

...for all the $$ put in to these high end models from various brand name, if I don't get at least 10 to 20 yr. out of it, then it's not worth the $$ spent. ...

Set longevity is off-topic to this thread, which is about color fidelity. It may be important to you but for video enthusiasts who are the backbone of this forum, most TVs are out of date in 3-5 years anyway, so longevity doesn't matter beyond that point. I just gave away a 4 1/2 year old projection set. It still worked like new but I just wanted to move on.
post #27 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by voook View Post

This TV is plainly a gimmick for a few reasons:

A) The primary colors for light are only red, green, and blue. For paint, ink, etc... the primary colors are red, blue, and yellow. I imagine that this is one of the ways this TV will confuse people.
B) HDTV is going to distribute digital signals quite simply in digital values for the intensity of red, green, and blue. The intensity is (2^8)(2^8)(2^8) (or #000000 - #FFFFFF, with the first two characters of that hexadecimal numeration representing the intensity of RGB, respectively). Throwing in a yellow pixel will do very little other than increase the potential for pixelation (normally a pixel contains three small LEDs or liquid crystals - in this TV it'll have four, increasing pixel size by 33% What do we have when the yellow pixel is not in use ? A black spot of course. The difference is [RGB] [RGBY].




- Let it be said that HD is in and of itself a gimmick unless you have a small screen. For example, my laptop with a 14" screen, is effectively 1080p (the p is for vertical pixels). If you have a 26" screen, you still have *only* 1080 pixels vertically (at least that's the max resolution of HDTV). If you have a 40" screen, regretfully you still have the same resolution, just larger pixels. To prove this, go to any electronics store and compare the small quality HDTV picture with those on the large units - the large units look horrible. One theoretical advantage of analog TV is that each pixel (still RGB) could represent more than one color. I.e. - a single HDTV pixel is exactly one color, the color value at the top of each pixel is exactly the same as the color at the bottom of the pixel. On an analog set, the top of a single pixel could be black, for example, while the bottom half was a different color. Analog will always have capabilities exceeding digital - the problem is the transmission medium.

it is possible that the yellow, since it is a secondary would junk make a kinked gamut extension which are hard to deal with but it is possible that it might also allow it to simply deliver the regular sRGB/REC709 more accurately too, remains to be seen




not really at all

first you are mixing up RGB with an encoding gamut such as AdobeRGB or sRGB

second, analog sets can't magically jump in resolution without fast, more precise electron gun control and tighter aperture masks, no different than how an LCD wont' deliver more than 1080p unless you add more elements to it

analog sets could, in a way, more transparently show resolutions lower then their top reosolution than an LCD set, but that is a different issue and they tend to be a bit fuzzier to begin with anyway
post #28 of 199
I find it hard to believe most people in this forum upgrade once every 4 yr.
post #29 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by happy hopping View Post

I find it hard to believe most people in this forum upgrade once every 4 yr.

Think it's more often?
post #30 of 199
If this is a response to my post, I didn't say "most people on this forum". I said "video enthusiasts who are the backbone of this forum". I don't have hard data but I'd bet that most such enthusiasts have no interest in keeping a set 10 years or more.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: LCD Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › sharp quattron is it marketing gimmick? I think so