or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Tech Talk › NEW RPX (Regal Premium Experience) Theaters
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

NEW RPX (Regal Premium Experience) Theaters

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I did not know where to post this, but thought it was a neat article that some of you may enjoy from our local news. Regal Entertainment is a Knoxville based company.

Source:http://www.volunteertv.com/home/headlines/90333319.html

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) - A Knoxville-based company announced its latest project to improve your movie-going experience on Thursday.

Regal Entertainment owns the largest theater chain in the nation.

The company's latest innovation is called the Regal Premium Experience or RPX.

RPX involves converting individual screens into premium environments. The upgraded theaters will feature luxurious seats that have high-back head rests. The theaters will also have large 60 foot wide immersive screens and dual 30,000 lumen digital projectors capable of showing Real 3D and 2D movies. They will also be equipped with state-of-the-art 100,000 watt 9.1 digital audio speaker systems with 273 loudspeaker components including eight 21 inch subwoofers.

"Regal patrons have shown a strong preference for viewing films in premium environments," said Greg Dunn, President and Chief Operating Officer for Regal Entertainment Group in a news release. "Each RPX location will be individually designed and tailored by our technicians and will feature high-quality digital projectors and screens complemented by a custom surround sound system. The addition of the RPX locations to Regal's already successful IMAX strategy will complement and extend the number of Regal theaters featuring premium movie-going experiences."

The first RPX theater will open May 7th at Regal Cinemas E-Walk Stadium 13 on 42nd Street in New York.

The company has not said if it plans to build RPX screens at any of its East Tennessee Theaters.
post #2 of 20
There is no such thing as a 30,000 lumen digital projector. The only projectors that come anywhere close to that are IMAX film projectors.

I don't understand why they are putting in two projectors since Regal and AMC only use RealD except for the LieMAX systems.
post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter0328 View Post

There is no such thing as a 30,000 lumen digital projector. The only projectors that come anywhere close to that are IMAX film projectors.

I don't understand why they are putting in two projectors since Regal and AMC only use RealD except for the LieMAX systems.

2 projectors produce a brighter image than just one projector.

And RealD has a "super 3D system" already . . . RealD XL

And yes - there is a 30,000 Lumen digital projector - 33,000 to be exact - from Barco:

http://www.barco.com/en/digitalcinem...uct/2218/specs
post #4 of 20
The quote did say dual 30,000 lumen projos though. hard to say, but dang it does sound real nice to me.
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNnDENVER View Post

The quote did say dual 30,00 lumen projos though. hard to say, but dang it does sound real nice to me.

Twin Barco's using the 7KW xenon bulb = 66,000 lumens. See my link above.
post #6 of 20
I stand corrected. Thanks for the info Lee! Wouldn't 30,000 lumens kinda hurt? haha
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter0328 View Post

I stand corrected. Thanks for the info Lee! Wouldn't 30,000 lumens kinda hurt? haha

An IMAX 15/70 projector = The bulb for the projector is a 15,000-watt, water-cooled xenon unit.

So if 7KW = 33,000 lumens then 15KW = 70,715 lumens

Years ago Barco had a series of projectors called; "Light Cannons"

What would you call an IMAX PJ? A Mini Sun?
post #8 of 20
Quote:


"The 100,000 watt digital audio system will surround moviegoers in a specially designed 9.1 speaker array providing pinpoint sound. This powerful sound system incorporates 273 loudspeaker components including eight 21″ subwoofers for deep resonating bass."

It would be interesting to know which audio codec and post processing is used to deliver the 9.1 sound . . . and the 'closest' processor available in the consumer marketplace [but it needs to function with fewer than "273 loudspeaker components including eight 21″ subwoofers" to be of any use to me! ]
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

It would be interesting to know which audio codec and post processing is used to deliver the 9.1 sound . . . and the 'closest' processor available in the consumer marketplace [but it needs to function with fewer than "273 loudspeaker components including eight 21″ subwoofers" to be of any use to me! ]

If you are thinking Dolby or DTS, neither have a 9.1 audio codec. The presser said "custom sound system."
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

An IMAX 15/70 projector = The bulb for the projector is a 15,000-watt, water-cooled xenon unit.

So if 7KW = 33,000 lumens then 15KW = 70,715 lumens

Years ago Barco had a series of projectors called; "Light Cannons"

What would you call an IMAX PJ? A Mini Sun?

Damn those are some big numbers!

Wouldn't IMAX has a lower lumen output though since when the light goes through the film it stops some of the light from reaching the screen compared to DLP?

Also IMAX screens are a lot bigger compared to normal ones (smallest IMAX is 70ft wide but they get up to 100 something I think) and this is going to be 60ft wide with Regal. It's going to be interesting lol.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter0328 View Post

Damn those are some big numbers!

Wouldn't IMAX has a lower lumen output though since when the light goes through the film it stops some of the light from reaching the screen compared to DLP?

Also IMAX screens are a lot bigger compared to normal ones (smallest IMAX is 70ft wide but they get up to 100 something I think) and this is going to be 60ft wide with Regal. It's going to be interesting lol.

With DLP, the light has to go through a prism to break the white light down to it's component parts = RGB. Then each component is bounced off the mirrors of it's specific colored chip and out through the lens.

AFAIK, the proper way to measure a screen's brightness is by measuring the light going back to the view in Ft. Lamberts.

Lumens is primarily used for home theaters AFAIK.

the lamp

Quote:
The lamphouse on top of the IMAX projector utilizes two 15,000-watt liquid-cooled, short-arc xenon lamps. The lamps weigh 10 pounds each, and are nearly two feet in length. Costing more than $6,000 each, the lamps have a life expectancy of only about 1,200 hours of operation and are replaced 4 times per year. Because of the extreme high-pressure xenon gas inside the quartz glass envelope of the lamp, projectionists must wear ballistic safety gear when changing out a lamp. If dropped, the xenon lamp would explode with the destructive force of a hand grenade.

The average luminance of one of these xenon lamps is approximately 1.6 billion candles per square yard--about equal to that of the Sun as viewed from the Earth's surface! The lamp has a light output of approximately 600,000 lumens. NASA uses this same type of lamp at the Kennedy Space Center to illuminate the Space Shuttle at night on the launching pad.

During normal operation, the clear quartz glass envelope of the lamp has a surface temperature of about 1,300 degrees. To prevent the lamp from overheating, it has coolant "jackets" that allow cool distilled water to be pumped around the electrodes at the flow rate of 8 gallons per minute and a pressure rate of 100 psi. In addition, an exhaust fan removes 1,200 cubic feet of air per minute from the lamphouse. The xenon lamps operate at 37.5 volts DC, and 400 amperes of

http://www.thehenryford.org/imax/about.aspx

Oops! Guess my numbers were off a bit.

post #12 of 20
That's just ridiculous (in a good way)!
post #13 of 20
The sound system will probably be based around the QSC Basis unit which would allow 9.1 channels of sound. Whether all of the channels are discreet is the other question.

Channel configuration will probably include 4 surround zones and 5 stage channels. Plus the sub channel.

Left - Left Center - Center - Right Center - Right

Left Surr - Left Back Surr - Right back Surr - Right Surr

Subwoofer


The front stage set up is similar to SDDS's 7.1 channel system that was around for awhile.

The funny thing is Harkins and Krikorian Cinemas are already using the QSC Basis system and running 5 stage channels in several of there large auditoriums. However the left and right center are matrixed from the 3 stage channels.

Here is some info on the BASIS system and its flexibility.
http://qscaudio.com/products/network...lnet_basis.htm

Here is some info on the subwoofers that will be used.
http://qscaudio.com/products/speaker...cs_sb15121.htm

As far as what speakers will be used for the stage system. It will most likely be Klipsch as Regal uses them exclusively in all new theater builds. However they may go with QSC since they are using there subs. Plus QSC is the only cinema loudspeaker company making a 21" subs right now.

Another thing to keep in mind about this announcement. Cinemark has there own custom designed digital system similar to Regal's called the Cinemark XD auditoroiums and AMC will have there own system called ETX. All the systems will probably offer similar experiences.

All the companies are doing this because of IMAX's success with there digital based system. However the custom setups from the theatre chanins will not be locked into playing one movie for extended periods of time and will be able to change movies as they please. While offering an experience similar to IMAX Digital.
post #14 of 20
I'm assuming by this premium experience they mean that the projector will actually be focused, the film framed properly on the screen and the audio set correctly, all three that were messed up and took 10 minutes for them to fix at a "normal" Regal theater I was at just yesterday to see Clash of the Titans in 2D. Most of the high school kids they hire at the theaters have no idea what's going on when showing 2D films, one can only guess how bad things could be with this escapade.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by subavision212 View Post

I'm assuming by this premium experience they mean that the projector will actually be focused, the film framed properly on the screen and the audio set correctly, all three that were messed up and took 10 minutes for them to fix at a "normal" Regal theater I was at just yesterday to see Clash of the Titans in 2D. Most of the high school kids they hire at the theaters have no idea what's going on when showing 2D films, one can only guess how bad things could be with this escapade.

These are some of the exact reasons I haven't been to a theater other than Rave Motion Pictures in over a year.
post #16 of 20
Hello, sorry for reviving this old thread but one of our theaters just happen to have this new RPX for the Avengers screening. Can anybody tell me their experience on this RPX projector? How does it compare to the IMAX 3D? I'm thinking of trying it out vs. IMAX 3D. I wonder what kind of 3D glass RPX uses? Is RPX just make a difference on the film or to the sounds as well just like IMAX? Any insight will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
post #17 of 20
Edtorious, RPX uses RealD glasses. It's become my standard theater to hit. I'm
Still I huge fan of IMAX and the screen size and auditorium setup of IMAX still, to me give IMAX more impact as far as picture goes, especially with movies filmed with IMAX cameras. The last 3D movie I saw on IMAX was Toy Story 3 so it's hard to really compare the two as far as 3D goes (as well as animated movies typically looking better than most live action 3D) The picture quality in RPX is top notch with some of the best 2D or 3D I've seen, same goes for IMAX. RPX screens use 2.35:1 i believe so the format is different from imax screens but its much larger than retrofit IMAX theaters, but not quite as big looking as a full size IMAX. I guess i cant speak for all RPX theaters, the in Denver was retrofit into a huge super70 stadium so others may have smaller screens. The audio of RPX is what really makes it stand out and is the first thing anyone I take there mentions when we come out of the theater. Super clear, very dynamic audio but the bass is what really makes it stand out. Literally shakes your clothes and feel it on your body. I am a very big fan of both formats and have probably got a bit off topic. Hope that helps somewhat
post #18 of 20
I've been sampling the "premium" theater setups in SoCal, lately, and I have to say RPX has been the most impressive so far.

I have never been a huge fan of the blown up versions of feature films on floor to ceiling IMAX. Documentary type films like deep sea dives, sure, but not fast-moving action. Too much head movement and eye strain for me.

Anyway, I went to see G.I. Joe in a Pure Digital Dolby3D theater not knowing it was shot in 2D. I was not overwhelmed by the effect, though that may be due to the way the film was prepared. I thought the Dolby type setup with the multifiltered glasses and different digital processing would be an upgrade over the usual RealD, but it didn't seem to make a difference. I saw a lot of ghosting in anything faster than a character walking. Eyestrain was minimal. There was no sound upgrade. In fact, the audio seemed out of sync at parts (in presentation, not editing). Overall, the added cost ($20 regular price) didn't add much to the experience. Maybe I'll come back to it and watch an actual 3D film so I can better compare it. It may be awhile, because I have experienced RPX and I can't imagine a better way to watch a movie.

Granted, having an equivalent at home would be even better, but the showing I went to was empty, so no theater fouls or distractions. First, the intro for the sound system was great. It reached a higher dB rating than would be comfortable for an entire film, but that was just the intro. The remainder was a perfect balance with more discreet channels, a little louder than usual, bass that's a punch to the chest, yet still clear and detailed - unlike some IMAX where I've heard muffled bass and distortion. The flat picture quality was amazing! Incredibly fine detail and accurate color (to my eyes) made close-up shots look vividly realistic. I expected the quality to drop off as soon as 3D really kicked in, but no amount of field focus or movement took anything away from the very lifelike representation. There was no eyestrain, ghosting or even fuzzy edges between foreground and back. The image was also as bright with the glasses on as a 2D movie. To top it all off, I got to prop myself up in a comfortable, clean new theater seat with a high headrest and rocking pivot to get in a good viewing angle.

RPX is my favorite so far. That may change if Regal drops the ball on quality control and standards, but if they keep it up, I may end up going to RPX screenings whenever possible.

It's 4:30am, so this is probably rambling, but I thought I'd throw it out there anyway.
post #19 of 20
Just wondering if RPX has curtains. I hate the current cineplex "experience."
I grew up going to movies where you never saw a blank screen. The movie started with the studio logo, then the curtains parted.
All part of the experience. No tacky advertising slide shows or word games. They even closed the curtains between the coming attractions
and the feature.
The closest you can get now are the two Cinerama Blu Ray's that simulate the curtains. ("This is Cinerama" & "Windjammer")
td
post #20 of 20
No. No curtains, but that does sound like a good touch to add to the experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: 3D Tech Talk
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Tech Talk › NEW RPX (Regal Premium Experience) Theaters