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Official Samsung LNxxC630 Calibration/Settings Thread - Page 15

post #421 of 800
How do we set the overscan? I have the LN46C630

I want to set my tv to 1:1 pixel mapping
post #422 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlsavs View Post

You could always download a freeware video pattern test disc ... and do an eye-ball job ... that is certainly better than nothing ... but will likely only give you a contrast/brightness settings improvement ... all imho.

J.

I agree. Get the AVCHD (.exe) free download here. Under Basic Patterns use #1 and 3 for brightness and contrast. 17 & 234 are the only numbers you need to know for those two patterns. If you have a blue filter or if your TV has a blue only mode you can use the flashing color bars for color saturation and hue. This is all any calibration disc is good for except two things: 1) sharpness which is a moot point when viewing high definition, and 2) white and primary color clipping - the AVCHD disc has a nice pattern for checking this.
post #423 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
I agree...Under Basic Patterns use #1 and 3 for brightness and contrast. 17 & 234 are the only numbers you need to know for those two patterns. If you have a blue filter or if your TV has a blue only mode you can use the flashing color bars for color saturation and hue. This is all any calibration disc is good for except two things: 1) sharpness which is a moot point when viewing high definition, and 2) white and primary color clipping - the AVCHD disc has a nice pattern for checking this.
Thanks guys. I'll give it a shot. I've settled on using a hybrid mix of some of the settings posted here and an eyeball calibration while watching avatar in HD on hbo in for the meantime. It looks good enough where I can appreciate the new set without thinking too much about the picture but I'll try to dial it in this weekend.

Great set so far but standard def signals are absolutely horrid. The larger screen really shows off the warts on non HD material.
post #424 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
Yes, it might, and that's on my TV. There is no telling how my numbers will look on your display. The manufacturers don't exactly use military spec parts ya know?
yes buzzard on know and thanks a lot , but the problem is that i dont have a calibration software, omle the video essentles dvd. and that does not help very much. I tryed your setting , but i prefer to watch movies with the light on, what would you recound , for viewing , with the light on, for the gama , backlight and contrast. thans in advance
post #425 of 800
Thanks for suggesting AVSHD, it's pretty neat.

About card #3, the screen says something like, "Adjust white level until 230-234 or higher is flashing". What does this mean?

Even at 100 contrast, many more bars above 234 are flashing. In fact at 100 contrast, only the bars on the very far right of the screen engulfed in white. Am I doing this part wrong?

One final question, does RGB mode set to blue count as a "blue filter" for certain tests in the Misc area? Or do I need to get a pair of dorky glasses from THX?

Should super white be set to on or off (PS3)?
post #426 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrkrft View Post

Thanks for suggesting AVSHD, it's pretty neat.

About card #3, the screen says something like, "Adjust white level until 230-234 or higher is flashing". What does this mean?

Even at 100 contrast, many more bars above 234 are flashing. In fact at 100 contrast, only the bars on the very far right of the screen engulfed in white. Am I doing this part wrong?

One final question, does RGB mode set to blue count as a "blue filter" for certain tests in the Misc area? Or do I need to get a pair of dorky glasses from THX?

Should super white be set to on or off (PS3)?

All this is based on SMPTE, The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, standards for HD media. Almost all of the picture content will fall from 17 (black) to 234 (white). Adjust brightness so that you can just barely see 17 flashing. Do this in a dark room after your eyes have adjusted. Although white level for television purposes tops at 234 there is no harm in show 235 and beyond (called "above white") but there is so little content in this area that I don't use it. I get the largest amount of "pop" seeing 17-234 only. The fact that your set still shows above white with the contrast maxed is no big deal if colors are not clipped. Use the A3 color steps pattern, the one where each primary and secondary color grades from 16 to 235 and make sure that each individual 5% step for all colors is clear and visible from the block next to it. If any blend together, turn down the contrast until they are distinct.

The blue only mode setting in the TV is the same as wearing the blue filter glasses.

From the PS3 manual:

Y Pb / Cb Pr / Cr Super-White (HDMI)
Adjust output settings for TVs that support Y Pb / Cb Pr / Cr input signals. Super-white signal can be output when playing a DVD, Blu-ray Disc (BD), or AVCHD-format video. This setting is for use when the TV is connected to the PS3 system using an HDMI cable.
Off Disable super-white output.
On Enable super-white output.
Hints
If image quality is reduced or the image does not look right when this option is set to [On], set to [Off].
[Automatic] or [Y Pb / Cb Pr / Cr] must be selected in [BD / DVD Video Output Format (HDMI)] under (Settings) > (Video Settings). *
* When [Automatic] is set, the TV in use must support a Y Pb / Cb Pr / Cr input signal.
post #427 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrkrft View Post

Two days after my last reply in which I indicated Buzz's settings looked fantastic on my SQ02 panel, I return here to report that I exchanged my SQ02 for an AA based panel. While the SQ display had beautiful blacks, the image was not sharp enough for my liking.

Now I'm stuck with a panel that doesn't have many calibration settings (I counted one in this thread which I am not 100% pleased with).

Instead of sitting on my hands waiting for someone to post pro calibration settings for an AA panel, I was wondering what cost effective options I have to calibrate the image myself. I would prefer a cheap solution that doesn't involve any additional instruments - primarily because I'm a noob and don't want to learn the science of TV calibration, and secondarily because a colorimeter is most certainly out of my budget this time of the year.

Do any common BD's have a calibration function?

I don't get this. I've seen both an AA and an SQ02 panel side by side (I have an SQ02 at home). I don't see the soft picture that people are talking about (Mike999 in particular). Granted, sd content may look a bit softer, but my HD material is razor sharp. confused over here....
post #428 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jottle View Post

I don't get this. I've seen both an AA and an SQ02 panel side by side (I have an SQ02 at home). I don't see the soft picture that people are talking about (Mike999 in particular). Granted, sd content may look a bit softer, but my HD material is razor sharp. confused over here....

On my set, there was a distinct lack of sharpness/clarity on HD content. In scenes with closeups of people's faces sharpness was fine, but there was a noticeable (to me) lack of sharpness when shots were were pulled further back.

I tried cranking the sharpness on the TV to compensate for the picture's overall softness, but was met with artifacting rather than the sharper results I desired. I have a 2009 46" Samsung which was noticeably sharper than the LN40C630.

If you don't perceive a problem with your set, all the power to you. I'm not trying to campaign that one panel is better than another. This whole panel lottery mess is a nightmare I hope not to revisit for another few years at least.
post #429 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrkrft View Post

On my set, there was a distinct lack of sharpness/clarity on HD content. In scenes with closeups of people's faces sharpness was fine, but there was a noticeable (to me) lack of sharpness when shots were were pulled further back.

I tried cranking the sharpness on the TV to compensate for the picture's overall softness, but was met with artifacting rather than the sharper results I desired. I have a 2009 46" Samsung which was noticeably sharper than the LN40C630.

If you don't perceive a problem with your set, all the power to you. I'm not trying to campaign that one panel is better than another. This whole panel lottery mess is a nightmare I hope not to revisit for another few years at least.

I know this is the settings thread, and this whole discussion should probably go into the owners thread, but I'll add my two cents.

After reading through all the discussions on panel differences, I went to a few Best Buys over the weekend, with the intent of finding some S panels to get and compare to the A panels on my recently purchased 40C630 (AA01) and 55C630 (AA02), and had good luck, coming home with a 40C630 (SQ02) and 55C630 (SQ03), so I could see side-by-side which ones I liked better.

I'd read that the A panels are 'sharper' but don't offer quite as good of black levels and viewing angles of the S panels, and figured I wouldn't be able to notice sharpness differences, but probably could tell viewing angles and black levels a little better.

I hooked up the 55C630 (SQ03) first, with it right in front of the 55C630 (AA02), both running the same Dish HD content, with one over component and the other over HDMI. The difference in the two panels was immediately visible from the front, even just pulling up the Dish program guide: The S panel looked like crap. Extremely 'soft' and 'blurry' looking, and the other thing I noticed was that you could easily see the structure of the screen, almost a screen door effect, that you couldn't notice on the A panel, even when getting up close. With identical settings (pretty much just standard mode with some tweaks to turn enhancements off), the colors on the S panel were pushed up more dramatically (watching Ice Age: The Meltdown, Diego was more orange, trees were more green, etc.), and the image seemed 'blacker' in the dark areas, overall, but... blurry. I would almost go so far as to say that it looked 'standard definition'. Of course, I quickly switched the input sources between the sets (Component and HDMI cables) to make sure the signal type wasn't an issue, and got the same results.

Off angle seemed a little better on the SQ03 panel, but not as noticeable as I thought it might be. It actually made me think that off-angle viewing wasn't as noticeable on the AA02 panel as I'd originally thought. That being said, I was so displeased with the picture overall, that I didn't spend a lot of time looking at it. Even the sample test image in the 'troubleshooting' menu showed the differences I noted above. The picture seemed a lot more detailed, without noticeable 'structure', on the SQ03 panel.

And that's when I asked my wife what she thought, without saying anything. She also noticed more color from the SQ03, but I pulled up the the Dish guide (also not saying anything), and she immediately saw the softness I was talking about, and then noticed it overall in the video image; to quote: "you can see it in the trees", meaning that in the background images onscreen, you could see smaller details like leaves on the AA02, whereas the SQ03 panel just looked blurry. From there, you could see large differences in things like hair on animals, smoothness on shadows on ice textures, etc. The 55C630 SQ03 went immediately back in the box.

The next day, I did the same comparison on the 40C630 (AA01) and 40C630 (SQ02), and came up with similar results. Black was blacker, viewing angles were more noticeably better (without the UCP glossy screen to hide some differences, I figured), but the image was still softer, and you could still see some screen structure/blocking in the white/blueish shadow details on ice, text, menu guides on the SQ02. It wasn't nearly as noticeable on the 40 inch set, but I'm assuming it's simply because of the smaller screen size that the differences weren't as noticeable between the two.

Long story short, some of these panel generalizations definitely applied to this case on two different sized sets at the same time.
post #430 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrkrft View Post

On my set, there was a distinct lack of sharpness/clarity on HD content. In scenes with closeups of people's faces sharpness was fine, but there was a noticeable (to me) lack of sharpness when shots were were pulled further back.

I tried cranking the sharpness on the TV to compensate for the picture's overall softness, but was met with artifacting rather than the sharper results I desired. I have a 2009 46" Samsung which was noticeably sharper than the LN40C630.

If you don't perceive a problem with your set, all the power to you. I'm not trying to campaign that one panel is better than another. This whole panel lottery mess is a nightmare I hope not to revisit for another few years at least.

Have you thought about getting it calibrated for your environment, that seems to help.
post #431 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollismb View Post

I know this is the settings thread, and this whole discussion should probably go into the owners thread, but I'll add my two cents.

After reading through all the discussions on panel differences, I went to a few Best Buys over the weekend, with the intent of finding some S panels to get and compare to the A panels on my recently purchased 40C630 (AA01) and 55C630 (AA02), and had good luck, coming home with a 40C630 (SQ02) and 55C630 (SQ03), so I could see side-by-side which ones I liked better.

I'd read that the A panels are 'sharper' but don't offer quite as good of black levels and viewing angles of the S panels, and figured I wouldn't be able to notice sharpness differences, but probably could tell viewing angles and black levels a little better.

I hooked up the 55C630 (SQ03) first, with it right in front of the 55C630 (AA02), both running the same Dish HD content, with one over component and the other over HDMI. The difference in the two panels was immediately visible from the front, even just pulling up the Dish program guide: The S panel looked like crap. Extremely 'soft' and 'blurry' looking, and the other thing I noticed was that you could easily see the structure of the screen, almost a screen door effect, that you couldn't notice on the A panel, even when getting up close. With identical settings (pretty much just standard mode with some tweaks to turn enhancements off), the colors on the S panel were pushed up more dramatically (watching Ice Age: The Meltdown, Diego was more orange, trees were more green, etc.), and the image seemed 'blacker' in the dark areas, overall, but... blurry. I would almost go so far as to say that it looked 'standard definition'. Of course, I quickly switched the input sources between the sets (Component and HDMI cables) to make sure the signal type wasn't an issue, and got the same results.

Off angle seemed a little better on the SQ03 panel, but not as noticeable as I thought it might be. It actually made me think that off-angle viewing wasn't as noticeable on the AA02 panel as I'd originally thought. That being said, I was so displeased with the picture overall, that I didn't spend a lot of time looking at it. Even the sample test image in the 'troubleshooting' menu showed the differences I noted above. The picture seemed a lot more detailed, without noticeable 'structure', on the SQ03 panel.

And that's when I asked my wife what she thought, without saying anything. She also noticed more color from the SQ03, but I pulled up the the Dish guide (also not saying anything), and she immediately saw the softness I was talking about, and then noticed it overall in the video image; to quote: "you can see it in the trees", meaning that in the background images onscreen, you could see smaller details like leaves on the AA02, whereas the SQ03 panel just looked blurry. From there, you could see large differences in things like hair on animals, smoothness on shadows on ice textures, etc. The 55C630 SQ03 went immediately back in the box.

The next day, I did the same comparison on the 40C630 (AA01) and 40C630 (SQ02), and came up with similar results. Black was blacker, viewing angles were more noticeably better (without the UCP glossy screen to hide some differences, I figured), but the image was still softer, and you could still see some screen structure/blocking in the white/blueish shadow details on ice, text, menu guides on the SQ02. It wasn't nearly as noticeable on the 40 inch set, but I'm assuming it's simply because of the smaller screen size that the differences weren't as noticeable between the two.

Long story short, some of these panel generalizations definitely applied to this case on two different sized sets at the same time.

Interesting. This sounds like a more controlled test than what I performed. I guess ignorance is bliss for those of us with an SQ02 I'm stuck with my panel (past 30 day return period), but the good uniformity and black levels prompted me to keep this set regardless of differences between the panel types. Either way, if you're looking for a sharper picture, perhaps the AA panels are the way to go.
post #432 of 800
Weird. It truly is a panel lottery then because my 40" SQ02 is razor sharp. Colors are another matter and is 99% calibration differences.
post #433 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post

Weird. It truly is a panel lottery then because my 40" SQ02 is razor sharp. Colors are another matter and is 99% calibration differences.

But buzzard, do you have the > shaped pixel structure? I'm betting you do as every single 40C630 SQ02 panel mentioned on this thread (including mine) has that structure. Supposedly it's the older structure. So if yours is very sharp, and mine is pretty sharp by my eyes, then there is another variable here (manufacturing plants getting different SQ02 panels?) that's causing this difference. Or it's just the usual: sharpness is subjective.
post #434 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jottle View Post
But buzzard, do you have the > shaped pixel structure? I'm betting you do as every single 40C630 SQ02 panel mentioned on this thread (including mine) has that structure. Supposedly it's the older structure. So if yours is very sharp, and mine is pretty sharp by my eyes, then there is another variable here (manufacturing plants getting different SQ02 panels?) that's causing this difference. Or it's just the usual: sharpness is subjective.
Good point. I have to keep reminding myself that the room in which my displayed is viewed has very bright indirect sunlight and that is why I bought a TV with a matte panel in the first place. Perhaps if I had another unit in a side by side comparison I would change my opinion.
post #435 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by natflag View Post

How do we set the overscan? I have the LN46C630

I want to set my tv to 1:1 pixel mapping

Press the P-size button, or go into the picture settings (Advanced, I believe). It only lets you set it to 'Screen Fit' 1:1 (mapping) for certain types of content (not 480i, or 720p, I don't think, for example).
post #436 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jottle View Post
buzzard, do you have the > shaped pixel structure? I'm betting you do as every single 40C630 SQ02 panel mentioned on this thread (including mine) has that structure. Supposedly it's the older structure. So if yours is very sharp, and mine is pretty sharp by my eyes, then there is another variable here (manufacturing plants getting different SQ02 panels?) that's causing this difference. Or it's just the usual: sharpness is subjective.
It's possible the lack of sharpness could be explained by Samsung using cheaper video processing chips for S models, as the difference is most apparent with sources upscaled by the TV. However, I doubt Samsung would use different chips for A and S versions, as they could then be accused of selling different TVs as the same model. What's probably happening is that the slight blurriness of the individual subpixels (from a normal viewing distance the > structure is equivalent to a rectangular subpixel that is blurred somewhat) somehow gets compounded over large groups of pixels, thus effectively reducing the resolution of the TV. The overall impression is similar to the slight fuzziness of an analog tube TV or a digital image that has been upscaled slightly.

My guess is that Samsung and Sony came up with the > structure probably as a means of blocking out some of the backlighting on an LCD display, thereby producing deeper blacks than were possible with older TN or IPS panels. The tradeoff was decreased sharpness and a slight asymmetry in off angle viewing.

The question is why Samsung and Sony still use this > matrix as AMVA3 and the newer Sharp and S-PVA panels - which all have rectangular pixels - are capable of producing very deep blacks and have better sharpness. Maybe they're just trying to get rid of older stock or maybe they just don't want to shut down the manufacturing plants and lay off workers. In either case, I would bet in a few years no LCD TVs will be using the > structure.
post #437 of 800
First: A very great thank you to all who have shared their settings and experience. The rest of us really appreciate it.

I'm the happy owner of a 40C650 / SQ02 panel. The panel is terrific...to me, at least. I'm no expert, but I don't think I see flashlighting, clouding or banding. The edges (near the bezel) are slightly brighter than the central area, but just by a bit. Uniformity looks good, especially once I realized that what I thought was a dark blob was simply my own reflection.

Out of the box, the picture looked like downtown Las Vegas, and what happens in Vegas should stay in Vegas, so I applied CNet's calibration settings. I should add that almost all of my viewing is done at night in a mostly dark living room.

I really tried to like my calibrated TV. But after two days, I just couldn't take it anymore. The picture looked dull and the colors seemed all washed out. It looked like I was watching my TV through a dirty windshield. I know, I know...Movie mode and Warm2 are supposed to get real close to D65. Well, that might make for good looking charts, but it didn't make for a good looking picture. Not to me, at least.

So here's what I did. I started with CNet's settings and made these changes:

1- Picture Mode - change Movie to Standard
As a result, the 10 point White Balance is now inaccessible (gray)

2- Color tone - change Warm2 to Warm1

3- HDMI black level - change Normal to Low

That's it; everything else is per CNet.

Now I have a picture that I really like. As time goes by, I may tweak a bit here and there. But for now, I'm really happy with my TV. I mean no disrespect to those who've worked so hard and posted all their graphs. I guess I'm just not a connoisseur. I'd probably frustrate an ISF calibrator.

But if we end up with a picture that pleases us, I guess that's the bottom line.
post #438 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrkrft View Post

On my set, there was a distinct lack of sharpness/clarity on HD content. In scenes with closeups of people's faces sharpness was fine, but there was a noticeable (to me) lack of sharpness when shots were were pulled further back.

I tried cranking the sharpness on the TV to compensate for the picture's overall softness, but was met with artifacting rather than the sharper results I desired. I have a 2009 46" Samsung which was noticeably sharper than the LN40C630.

If you don't perceive a problem with your set, all the power to you. I'm not trying to campaign that one panel is better than another. This whole panel lottery mess is a nightmare I hope not to revisit for another few years at least.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jottle View Post

I don't get this. I've seen both an AA and an SQ02 panel side by side (I have an SQ02 at home). I don't see the soft picture that people are talking about (Mike999 in particular). Granted, sd content may look a bit softer, but my HD material is razor sharp. confused over here....

From the posts regarding those panels its obvious that some perform better than others, even those from the same manufacturer. Without a proper means to check them there is no way to determine how bad each panel is.

There are enough complaints out there to fill every rank on the 1 to 10 scale, so if you were to compare a mediocre performing SQ panel against a better performing SQ panel you would likely see similar results.
post #439 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post

I agree. Get the AVCHD (.exe) free download here. Under Basic Patterns use #1 and 3 for brightness and contrast. 17 & 234 are the only numbers you need to know for those two patterns. If you have a blue filter or if your TV has a blue only mode you can use the flashing color bars for color saturation and hue. This is all any calibration disc is good for except two things: 1) sharpness which is a moot point when viewing high definition, and 2) white and primary color clipping - the AVCHD disc has a nice pattern for checking this.

I'm still trying to wrap my head around all this, so pease be patient:

In summary, can one use this AVCHD with a BR player in the computer? Any special advice or cautions? If it matter I have a 5670 DGPU and an I3 processor so fairly current HTPC build.

I have the ln40c630 with SQ02 panel. Primary use will be as HTPC/computer moniter (as you may surmise above). I've only briefly scannned the link, and would like to "cut my teeth" on the Sammy since it has an easier "return to defaults" than the Sony in the family room.

I'm in data overload after the manual, google and these various threads...
post #440 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by benjamin2 View Post

From the posts regarding those panels its obvious that some perform better than others, even those from the same manufacturer. Without a proper means to check them there is no way to determine how bad each panel is.

There are enough complaints out there to fill every rank on the 1 to 10 scale, so if you were to compare a mediocre performing SQ panel against a better performing SQ panel you would likely see similar results.

Obviously you can't compare SQ panels of different sizes or model numbers because the graphics processing and pixel matrices will be different. For a particular model in a given year, the image quality should be pretty much the same.

At this point, I've seen lots of customer reports on the SQ version of the 40C630, and almost all of them complain of a soft image. It would be helpful of course if CNET or someone else would compare the S-PVA version to the AMVA3 version, but as for me, I have no doubt that the latter produces a sharper image while the former has a deeper black level.
post #441 of 800
Had a chance to try out SQ03 and compare to AA03 today. OMG! SQ03 must be the biggest fail of electronics I was ever "fortunate" enough to bring home. If you ever wondered what the lakes of swirling pixels dancing all over the screen would look like... well treat yourself with an SQ03. It's unreal. Often greenish unreal.

Called Samsung to ask them about it.. and she was like, can you run diagnostics - which shows a static image. Stable enough. "Right, well, sir, there is nothing wrong with the TV". Sheesh... that was a test, static image of the sky and the beach. Must be a torture to an LCD. Put some moving pictures and there you are again, treated with swirly chaos of colors. What is that?!!!

AA03 is simply... exemplary in comparison.
post #442 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziimen View Post
Had a chance to try out SQ03 and compare to AA03 today. OMG! SQ03 must be the biggest fail of electronics I was ever "fortunate" enough to bring home. If you ever wondered what the lakes of swirling pixels dancing all over the screen would look like... well treat yourself with an SQ03. It's unreal. Often greenish unreal.

Called Samsung to ask them about it.. and she was like, can you run diagnostics - which shows a static image. Stable enough. "Right, well, sir, there is nothing wrong with the TV". Sheesh... that was a test, static image of the sky and the beach. Must be a torture to an LCD. Put some moving pictures and there you are again, treated with swirly chaos of colors. What is that?!!!

AA03 is simply... exemplary in comparison.
It sounds like you had a defective panel.
post #443 of 800
Skibum I tried your latest settings on my 55 inch c650 with an sq01 panel. The picture is fantastic! Thanks very much!
post #444 of 800
Anyone have settings for a 55" c650 AA02 panel? skibum's work pretty well on my panel, but skin tones look a hair off.
post #445 of 800
I am tweaking this TV for a friend and want to know how to access the service mode so I can change the settings with some of the recommendations listed here. Thanks in advance.
post #446 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanesFan View Post

I am tweaking this TV for a friend and want to know how to access the service mode so I can change the settings with some of the recommendations listed here. Thanks in advance.

The new Samsungs do not require service menu entry for calibration. There is NOTHING in there that will help you, and a hundred items that will screw up your TV.

Before you change anything in GS and gamut, set brightness, contrast, and sharpness using a calibration disc.

In the user menu, select the movie mode, advanced settings.

Grayscale is set with the 10 point white balance.
Color gamut and luminance is set with color space, custom.
post #447 of 800
Thanks buzzard!
post #448 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by pintomp3 View Post

Anyone have settings for a 55" c650 AA02 panel? skibum's work pretty well on my panel, but skin tones look a hair off.

I used the "UK" settings found on this forum and only upped the backlight a little. Very happy with them. /Dan (let me know if you need me to search the actual message, but they have been repeated a couple times)
post #449 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHAVES07 View Post

Jottle , i tried cnet settigs and i have "A" panel, i changed the advance setting acording to cnet setting and i like them a lot , only thing is that i left my brighness at 32 and backlight at 4, color at 40 , at 48 it looks to redish fore mi , mabey you will like it o and i put eco on auto i like how it makes the picture look to ...

I tried CNET's settings on the new LN46C600 (AA02) set that Best Buy is carrying. I picked it up mid last week. So far I really like their settings for Blu-ray viewing. When I bring up my Comcast guide, the colors do look dark in the menu. I plan to tweak these a bit more to see if I can get these any better.
post #450 of 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by danki6x View Post

I used the "UK" settings found on this forum and only upped the backlight a little. Very happy with them. /Dan (let me know if you need me to search the actual message, but they have been repeated a couple times)

You mean these settings?

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...k#post18618050

Do you have the same model and panel? I have a LN55c650 with an AA02 panel.
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