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The "Official" Pioneer VSX-1020-K Owner's Thread - Page 126

post #3751 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV-Newbee View Post


What is your opinion about this. I called Vanns (place where I had bought my receiver) and they guy adviced me NOT to buy the Sony or PolK. He said these subs are at the bottom, just throws out a loud Boom and no clarity. He suggested this one: Velodyne VX-11

Can you throw some light and guide me for this purchase? Should I purchase one of the two or any other that you can suggest?

Thank you once again
AV-NewBee

I agree with the guy from Vanns, I love my Velodyne, but it is a 12". Then get to work on replacing those Bose...
post #3752 of 4530
Hi

I purchased a 1020-k four months back but started setting it up yesterday as i was saving to buy my speakers. I connected the speakers yesterday and couldn't get to emit any sound of any speakers. I repeatedly checked the speaker settings in manual and made sure the speakers cable is properly stripped and not shorted.. checked all remote settings.. still couldn't get it to produce any sound. Did anyone here face this? found any leads to identify the problem? is there a fuse some where?

I'm so dissappointed with this. bought this on amazon thru a merchant.
post #3753 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV-Newbee View Post

Can you throw some light and guide me for this purchase? Should I purchase one of the two or any other that you can suggest?

http://www.lavasubs.com/8_inch/power...subwoofer.html

There is a forum here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1275777

and if you contact Eric
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/member.php?u=8274554
you can get an AVS member discount.
post #3754 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by company2 View Post

Hi

I purchased a 1020-k four months back but started setting it up yesterday as i was saving to buy my speakers. I connected the speakers yesterday and couldn't get to emit any sound of any speakers. I repeatedly checked the speaker settings in manual and made sure the speakers cable is properly stripped and not shorted.. checked all remote settings.. still couldn't get it to produce any sound. Did anyone here face this? found any leads to identify the problem? is there a fuse some where?

I'm so dissappointed with this. bought this on amazon thru a merchant.

Do you get sound out of the headphone jack? If not, unit is probably DOA. Trying a new fuse would be a good idea. If headphones work:
Display on the lower left should say SP>A. Press "speaker" button if it doesn't.
post #3755 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV-Newbee View Post

Can you throw some light and guide me for this purchase? Should I purchase one of the two or any other that you can suggest?

Well the quality you need for the sub is entirely dependent on your taste or threshold for sound quality, and the rest of your setup.

I would suggest keeping in line with the quality of the rest of your speakers (I really don't know about the Bose though). If you invest good money in a sub but stay with crappy fronts, that doesn't make much sense.

Then again, in your case, the sub will be used to get more bass overall, not just to play the LFE (low frequency effects). So you'd probably want something that sounds nice, not just something that can produce loud booms.

If you're in a small room, you don't need a very powerful nor a very large sub. For example, my Energy ESW-C8 is more than enough for my living room; sub placement will probably more important to get good bass than raw power. Amazon.com currently lists it only slightly over the Sony sub you considered, and while it's by no means a high-end sub, I thing it would be a better choice.

EDIT: your Velodyne link at Vann's lists the same price as the Energy at Amazon and is probably a better sub (or at least more powerful). So that's a pretty good deal I think.
post #3756 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by company2 View Post

(...)
stripped and not shorted.. checked all remote settings.. still couldn't get it to produce any sound.

Sorry to hear that. Before you return it though, as said before check the Speaker A/B settings. But also rule out any problem with the source you're trying to listen to. I'm not necessarily saying that there is a problem with the source itself (e.g. player), but to which input you connected it on the 1020 and how you select it on the receiver. There is *lots* of inputs on the 1020 so it's easy to get confused.

Also, stupid question but, I assume you tried raising the volume? Out of the box the 1020 is set at -80 dB (minimum) and depending on your speakers and source, you may have to raise that to -40 dB before hearing something, and -30 to -20 to get a comfortable volume.
post #3757 of 4530
hey everybody anybody know if there is a universal dongle that fits the pioneer thats cheaper that what pioneer is selling
post #3758 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by biggz1 View Post

hey everybody anybody know if there is a universal dongle that fits the pioneer thats cheaper that what pioneer is selling

If you mean bluetooth adapter, nope.
post #3759 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by company2 View Post

I'm so dissappointed with this. bought this on amazon thru a merchant.

Any luck?
post #3760 of 4530
Hey all, I ran into a problem the other day with this unit. I was having a Halloween party, and wanted to run an extra set of speakers to my garage. I have a wireless speaker set, that has both a 3.5mm input and a 2 channel rca input.

I figured the easiest way was to use a 3.5mm to 1/4inch adapter to the headphone output. My old receiver would obviously cut off the speakers when a headphone was inserted, but then you could re-enable them to allow both headphones and speakers at once. I could not find a way to re-enable the speakers with this unit, is there a way to do this?

My second idea was to use the zone 2 output. I hooked everything up, but then realized the zone 2 output cannot be the same as the Main zone output. I got it to work with another input, but I wanted to use the same input (hdmi 1) for both, so the same music would be playing in both areas.

The only other output I saw was the tape output, but I could not get any audio out of that.

So is there an output that I can use or configure to get the same audio out that is playing on the main speakers?
post #3761 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

So is there an output that I can use or configure to get the same audio out that is playing on the main speakers?

I wanted the same thing for different reasons (i.e. keeping my wireless headphone base connected to the receiver at all times), but alas it is impossible with the 1020.

In fact, it's impossible with almost all home theater receivers nowadays. This is kind of stupid I think, but I haven't found a modern receiver (I looked at several models under 2k$) that would allow headphones output at the same time as speaker outputs.

In the 1020 (and other receivers), digital sources are never converted to analog outputs (except for the headphones and speakers). Also, in the 1020, only analog sources, iPod and net radio can be sent to Zone 2. HDMI inputs cannot.

I bought the 1020 anyway because I couldn't find any other receiver that would do what my old sub-200$ JVC audio-only amp would allow me, namely using the headphones output at the same time as the speakers...
post #3762 of 4530
The Yamaha 867 does, that's why my 1020 moved to the bedroom!
post #3763 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregoryperkins View Post

The Yamaha 867 does, that's why my 1020 moved to the bedroom!

Is that true? You can play the speakers with the headphones plugged in with the RX-V867? Wow that alone would have made me think twice... However the 867 list price is about twice the Pio 102x list price.
post #3764 of 4530
I'm using the audio out to power another amp in my office. I have some Sennheiser wireless head phones that can be plugged into them. It also has 7.1 out, but that follows the volume of the amp.

There are many more network functions with it and it has dual hdmi for my projector. The pioneer has a very weak hdmi out signal and did not work with my a/b switch.

It's routinely available for half off at Newegg, currently oos.
post #3765 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregoryperkins View Post

I'm using the audio out to power another amp in my office. I have some Sennheiser wireless head phones that can be plugged into them. It also has 7.1 out, but that follows the volume of the amp.

There are many more network functions with it and it has dual hdmi for my projector. The pioneer has a very weak hdmi out signal and did not work with my a/b switch.

It's routinely available for half off at Newegg, currently oos.

Are you speaking of the Yamaha or the Pio when you say you're using the "audio out" with your Sennheiser wireless? With the Pio at least, the RCA analog outputs can only use non-digital sources.

The dual HDMI out is very nice in the Yamaha indeed. However a "very weak HDMI out signal" doesn't make much sense as HDMI is digital, and unless you have a very long cable, I'd be surprised if the signal power on HDMI was an issue. HDCP handshakes are probably the problem there.
post #3766 of 4530
On the Yamaha I am using the audio out for net radio as I type this.

I speak from experience on the weak signal. I used an a/b switch with a Yamaha before I got the pioneer. As soon as I put the Pioneer in, it became flaky. Yes it is a long run, but it worked with other receivers. I even tried a powered amp (both were from monoprice) and I could not get it to work reliably.

On a side note, my google tv bleeds over to the other hdmi port on my 867, very strange. When I disconnect it, the receiver works fine. It is in an odd location, between the hdmi out of the tv and the tv since I do not use hdmi on my cable box. Hdmi has some pretty strange peculiarities.
post #3767 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregoryperkins View Post

On the Yamaha I am using the audio out for net radio as I type this.

Ah I think you're speaking of pre outs, i.e. pre-amplification outputs for the speakers. The Pio 1020 doesn't have them -- I think the pre outs are features of the Pio 112x and above. This is nice but again, it depends how these are done.

In the Pio 1120 for example, there are two sets of pre out: for the fronts and for the 2nd zone. If you use the font pre outs, you must explicitly set the receiver in stereo mode if you plugged the headphones, or else you'll only get the front right and left channels of multi-channel sources. If you use the 2nd zone pre outs, the same limitations of 2nd zone applies, namely the sources that can be sent to 2nd zone are analog sources, iPod, and net radio. No Toslink or HDMI source can be sent to 2nd zone in the Pioneer. Can the Yamaha 867 do it?

So with the Pio 1120 it would be possible to use the pre-outs for headphones or to send the stereo signal to another amp, but not on the 1020. Considering that the 1120 was way more expensive than the 1020 when I bought it, and that I would have had to constantly switch from stereo to suroround mode, I decided that the hassle of plugging the headphones in the headphone jack was not that bad. Plus, there is a headphone surround mode available when you use the headphone jack. Does the job of the 100$ digital surround processors you can buy...
post #3768 of 4530
That's why I got the 867, and for the dual hdmi.
post #3769 of 4530
Has anyone used this receiver in only 5.1 mode? I know there should not be any problems with that but a friend is swearing that it makes a difference in how the movie audio sounds. Anyone have any input?
post #3770 of 4530
I ran it like that for months before I added my height speakers. It worked great.
post #3771 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorbycody View Post

Has anyone used this receiver in only 5.1 mode? I know there should not be any problems with that but a friend is swearing that it makes a difference in how the movie audio sounds. Anyone have any input?

Absolutely no problem with any speaker arrangement. You simply tell the 1020 which speakers you have, and it manages the best as it can with the source you have.

5.1 is what most people buying an AVR will have anyway; there is very few true 7.1 sources. Of course 7.1 will add something -- well I hope so -- to how the movie audio sounds, but overall the MCACC in the 1020 will calibrate whatever you throw at it and do a very good job of rendering 5.1, 6.1 and 7.1 sources with a 5.1 setup.

By the way, it's not a "mode" per se on the 1020. You just tell it to listen in surround (by contrast to stereo only) and it will figure out how to play to source with all your speakers.
post #3772 of 4530
Thanks for the verification guys, much appreciated.
post #3773 of 4530
I have no idea where they found a pile of this old receiver, but it is the deal of the day at Amazon.
post #3774 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregoryperkins View Post

I have no idea where they found a pile of this old receiver, but it is the deal of the day at Amazon.

Well it's not that old. It's the 2010 model, replaced by the vsx-1021-k at the end of 2010. The 1021 gains a few more media features (DLNA-compliant client, AirPlay for audio content only, Pandora), is slightly more powerful (10W more per channel) but loses one HDMI input (the European / Canadian vsx-1026-k retains 6 HDMI inputs though).

However, wow, today's price for the 1020 is certainly worth the shot as it's almost half the 1021's price. Certainly an excellent deal.
post #3775 of 4530
I'm not an audiophile, but I do enjoy great sound and future proof technology. I just picked up VSX-1020-K for $299 from Amazon,which I thought was a steal. I wanted VSX-1021-K but couldn't resist the price of VSX-1020-K. I want know if there is a major sound quality difference between the two or one lacking an important feature. I like to own my receiver for 4-5 years and don't want it to be obsolete before then. So I'm trying to decide if I should keep the receiver (VSX-1020-K) or sell it and purchase VSX-1021-K. Is it worth the trouble?
post #3776 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by SK23 View Post

I'm not an audiophile, but I do enjoy great sound and future proof technology. I just picked up VSX-1020-K for $299 from Amazon,which I thought was a steal. I wanted VSX-1021-K but couldn't resist the price of VSX-1020-K. I want know if there is a major sound quality difference between the two or one lacking an important feature. I like to own my receiver for 4-5 years and don't want it to be obsolete before then. So I'm trying to decide if I should keep the receiver (VSX-1020-K) or sell it and purchase VSX-1021-K. Is it worth the trouble?

Same here. The Airplay feature sounds cool but is it worth it?
post #3777 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by SK23 View Post

I'm not an audiophile, but I do enjoy great sound and future proof technology. I just picked up VSX-1020-K for $299 from Amazon,which I thought was a steal. I wanted VSX-1021-K but couldn't resist the price of VSX-1020-K. I want know if there is a major sound quality difference between the two or one lacking an important feature. I like to own my receiver for 4-5 years and don't want it to be obsolete before then. So I'm trying to decide if I should keep the receiver (VSX-1020-K) or sell it and purchase VSX-1021-K. Is it worth the trouble?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RYANtheTIGER View Post

Same here. The Airplay feature sounds cool but is it worth it?

Here's my take on it, as I've gone through the same questioning. However keep in mind that I have not actually tried the 1021.

I don't think that the 1021 is much different than the 1020 quality-wise. The specs boast a 10W RMS per channel increase, but I'm not sure the components inside the case are different. The power usage / heat seems to be increased in the 1021. Presumably, this is because Pioneer wanted the 1020 to be EnergyStar-compliant. I think they had to let that go with the 1021 in order to enable Network Standby (see below for more on that). If they're no more EnergyStar-compliant, maybe they just boosted the amp power a bit. Don't quote me on all of this though, this is mostly speculation.

In terms of important features, the differences between the 1020 and 1021 come down to:
  • One more HDMI input for the 1020
  • Network Standby in the 1021
  • DLNA-compliant client for the 1021
  • Compatibility with many net radio services in the 1021
  • Network firmware updates for the 1021
  • Airplay

The first point is major IMHO -- I chose the 1020 because 6 HDMI inputs is way over most AVRs in that category.

Network standby is the ability to wake up from standby using TCP/IP commands; this means, for example, that the iControlAV2 iOS app for the 1021 is able to power on the 1021 (it is not possible to do that with the 1020). This is important if you have home automation projects. This is a feature that I would have paid more to have, but I didn't know about it when buying the 1020. Not sure I'd have paid twice the price for this alone though.

DLNA client -- this is nice but requires a server software (such as TVersity) on a home computer. This means that the 1021 can directly access files listed by the DLNA server. This is interesting as it negates the need for a separate media player (e.g. Popcorn Hour, WDTV Live, BoxeeBox). I did not see the interface though, and I doubt it has all the features and quality of those players. A WDTV Live for example can be bought for less than 100$ and has a very usable interface. I'm not even sure that the DLNA client on the 1021 can play video (it would have to contain video decoding chips), and if so, I don't know which formats it supports.

Net radio services support (such as Pandora) may be a dealbreaker for some. However I like a lot the plain net radio URLs in the 1020, and it's rather straightforward to connect an iPhone or laptop to the 1020 if I want to use more elaborate apps/services.

Firmware updates -- that is hearsay on this forum. If they really enable that, it's a double-edged sword. More features (e.g. net radio services, etc.) could be enabled in the future; but bad firmwares and regressions can happen. The firmware in the 1020 is really simple by comparison, and I haven't found any bug.

Airplay is also big. It would be very nice to have, but keep in mind that Airplay on the 1021 is limited to audio. When I was shopping the 1020, the 1021 was at least 200$ more expensive. An Apple TV costs 120$, uses up the supplementary HDMI input on the 1020, and supports all forms of Airplay sources...

At 300$, the 1020 is excellent IMHO and whether to choose the 1021 over the 1020 depends entirely on the weight you give the features above. I for one would have loved to be able to power on the receiver by network, and I would gladly have forked at least 100$ more just for that.
post #3778 of 4530
I believe the 1021 adds ARC (Audio Return Channel)

It would have been nice to have this on the 1020

Is this the same thing we have on the 1020 or does the 1021 now include OSD for Volume control?

The description mentions the following:

Full-Color On-Screen Graphical User Interface

All of the VSX-1021-K's advanced control and connectivity options are made even better with a full-color user interface on your connected TV. Effortlessly navigate through the VSX-1021-K's menu and enjoy iTunes album art from a connected Apple device. This is one well-rounded AV receiver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neutro View Post

Here's my take on it, as I've gone through the same questioning. However keep in mind that I have not actually tried the 1021.

I don't think that the 1021 is much different than the 1020 quality-wise. The specs boast a 10W RMS per channel increase, but I'm not sure the components inside the case are different. The power usage / heat seems to be increased in the 1021. Presumably, this is because Pioneer wanted the 1020 to be EnergyStar-compliant. I think they had to let that go with the 1021 in order to enable Network Standby (see below for more on that). If they're no more EnergyStar-compliant, maybe they just boosted the amp power a bit. Don't quote me on all of this though, this is mostly speculation.

In terms of important features, the differences between the 1020 and 1021 come down to:
  • One more HDMI input for the 1020
  • Network Standby in the 1021
  • DLNA-compliant client for the 1021
  • Compatibility with many net radio services in the 1021
  • Network firmware updates for the 1021
  • Airplay

The first point is major IMHO -- I chose the 1020 because 6 HDMI inputs is way over most AVRs in that category.

Network standby is the ability to wake up from standby using TCP/IP commands; this means, for example, that the iControlAV2 iOS app for the 1021 is able to power on the 1021 (it is not possible to do that with the 1020). This is important if you have home automation projects. This is a feature that I would have paid more to have, but I didn't know about it when buying the 1020. Not sure I'd have paid twice the price for this alone though.

DLNA client -- this is nice but requires a server software (such as TVersity) on a home computer. This means that the 1021 can directly access files listed by the DLNA server. This is interesting as it negates the need for a separate media player (e.g. Popcorn Hour, WDTV Live, BoxeeBox). I did not see the interface though, and I doubt it has all the features and quality of those players. A WDTV Live for example can be bought for less than 100$ and has a very usable interface. I'm not even sure that the DLNA client on the 1021 can play video (it would have to contain video decoding chips), and if so, I don't know which formats it supports.

Net radio services support (such as Pandora) may be a dealbreaker for some. However I like a lot the plain net radio URLs in the 1020, and it's rather straightforward to connect an iPhone or laptop to the 1020 if I want to use more elaborate apps/services.

Firmware updates -- that is hearsay on this forum. If they really enable that, it's a double-edged sword. More features (e.g. net radio services, etc.) could be enabled in the future; but bad firmwares and regressions can happen. The firmware in the 1020 is really simple by comparison, and I haven't found any bug.

Airplay is also big. It would be very nice to have, but keep in mind that Airplay on the 1021 is limited to audio. When I was shopping the 1020, the 1021 was at least 200$ more expensive. An Apple TV costs 120$, uses up the supplementary HDMI input on the 1020, and supports all forms of Airplay sources...

At 300$, the 1020 is excellent IMHO and whether to choose the 1021 over the 1020 depends entirely on the weight you give the features above. I for one would have loved to be able to power on the receiver by network, and I would gladly have forked at least 100$ more just for that.
post #3779 of 4530
Quote:
Originally Posted by fox1541 View Post

I believe the 1021 adds ARC (Audio Return Channel)

Yes, I forgot about that. It also has standby passthrough I think. This is now standard on many middle-range AVRs so it is definitely lacking in the 1020. However I don't really need these so it was not a factor in my decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fox1541 View Post

Is this the same thing we have on the 1020 or does the 1021 now include OSD for Volume control?

The description mentions the following:

Full-Color On-Screen Graphical User Interface

All of the VSX-1021-K's advanced control and connectivity options are made even better with a full-color user interface on your connected TV. Effortlessly navigate through the VSX-1021-K's menu and enjoy iTunes album art from a connected Apple device. This is one well-rounded AV receiver.

I don't know if the 1020 has on-screen volume but I would doubt it. The description above was the same for the 1020 I think. The 1020 also is able to display iTunes album art, provided that both receiver ends of the adapter (i.e. including the yellow RCA bit) are connected.

That being said, album art is kind of ugly on the 1020 (tiny and often distorted), so I wouldn't say this is a compeling feature. The whole graphical interface is kind of a letdown in fact on the 1020 -- not sure if anything was changed in the 1021. I for one don't care much about the net radio interface shown on the TV. I'm very glad though that the same information is displayed on the pannel of the 1020: I'm able to listen to net radio without the TV on.

The only thing I like about the interface is during MCACC calibration: seeing which speaker is being tested could be very useful for debugging if you're facing a wire spaghetti situation.
post #3780 of 4530
It's funny, I got the Yamaha 867 after the 1020, it has osd volume and it is the biggest complaint by far. I tried explaining that some regarded it as a feature...

Endless complaints that it can't be turned off.
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