or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › The Theater formerly known as Basement
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Theater formerly known as Basement - Page 4

post #91 of 139
Thread Starter 
Well, they delivered the drywall this past week. The guys had a hell of a time getting in the basement, but they worked it out. I think the biggest problem for them was that they had to go up/over the railing a bit. Better them than me..
Here are some pics!

Thats a big truck..




Ready and waiting...

LL
LL
LL
post #92 of 139
Thread Starter 
I had some time today to finish up the new sub panel. I was able to get all of the new circuits in and get labels on. Another task crossed off of the the list. PM me if you are looking for a 12/24 sub panel. The Siemens one I pulled out is in excellent shape, and I have 12 double breakers to go along with it. Here are some images of the final product.

The inside turned out pretty well. The double breakers do make things a little tight, but not unmanageable. I installed a new Arc Fault so that I could split up the kids bedrooms. The builder got cheap and used on breaker for all the outlets in both bedrooms. Figured I might as well fix that while I was running wire. Same thing with the bathroom GFIs which were attached to a single breaker. Split those up as well so that the hall bath will be on its own circuit.


Labels help. I have a electrical legend on my computer, a printout of which I keep above the panels. That way I know exactly what is on every circuit.


With the door closed. I used the wire hangers to help keep things neat.

LL
LL
LL
post #93 of 139
How much did that sub panel cost? I put one in just for heating (probably should have put one for just the theater, argh!) - my electrician charged me $300. You can see it in my build thread....
post #94 of 139
Thread Starter 
Hi ELmO,
The panel came with the main 100A breaker and 6 single breakers. The 10 double breakers I bought separately. Without looking at the receipts, I probably have $250-$300 in parts (including $35 or so for the Arc Fault).
post #95 of 139
That is some envious cable management.

Both my main panel and sub look like spaghetti erupting from the top. A lot of hands in there over the years, I guess. I could take the time to fix it, but ugh. I think I'll just admire yours instead!
post #96 of 139
Thread Starter 
Thanks!
Considering there are 26 cables running in there, I was pretty pleased with the outcome. I can imagine that tackling an existing panel to clean up would be a daunting task.
post #97 of 139
Thread Starter 
Holy cow.. Has it really been that long since I posted?? Well, the drywall and Hardi-board is all up, just waiting to get quotes for a mud/taper. I used the extra sheets to finish the garage walls as well, so I'm hoping to get both done at the same time. Pictures soon!
post #98 of 139
Thread Starter 
Ah, another year, another post. Well, I have actually made some progress in the basement. Here are some pics of what will be my wifes craft room and the kids play area. I wanted to get these done so that I could move their stuff in and out of the way.
This first pic is looking to the right as you come down the stairs. The main entertainment area is to the left of this photo.


From the kids room looking into my wifes cave..


She has doors to keep little ones out..


Looking back the other way...


I also have the bar, main area, and hallways all painted. Still to paint are the gym, bathroom, and of course the theater...
post #99 of 139
Thread Starter 
And here are some pics of the theater with primer. Still trying to decide on a color scheme, which I think is the hardest part. I'm thinking blues (very dark) but have not found a pic of something to model after yet, and I dont have the imagination to come up with it on my own. I know my limits wink.gif

Looking from the rear right. I am really pleased so far with how the soffit lights are working out. They cast a really cool glow in the room. Excellent mood/indirect light.



From the front looking back..


Straight ahead looking forward with the downlights on.. Never mind the hairy guy....


Looking across the back of the theater to the equipment rack.
post #100 of 139
Hey Craig, you're theater is looking really good! Nice work so far! I decided to stop working on mine until I get the HVAC done so I know the feeling of not posting for a while :P
post #101 of 139
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback Chris. Trying to get my brain back in theater mode. It helps looking at this site and seeing some of the great work. I think once I pick some colors, I'll really get cranking on it again. I am in the analysis paralysis phase...
post #102 of 139
Good job. Can't wait to see next year's update! tongue.gif
post #103 of 139
Thread Starter 
Well, I have most of the riser construction completed. Nothing fancy, just a big box made of wood to sit a couch on. The final part of filling it with batt insulation and the double decking should be all that is left. Plan on gluing/screwing the first, add a layer of felt, then screw the final layer. Overall dimension is approximately 8' deep, 12' wide, and 10" high. Only the perimeter is on the ground. The stringers and cross braces are all cut short. I used an arch cut on the stringers because arches are cool.. cool.gif


The view from the front of the room.



Coming into the room. This entire side is a step. I am thinking I want to use a bullnose finish as opposed to carpet lip.



Step lights, cheap and effective. They will eventually be painted black.



The big grey worm is just conduit to allow access to underneath the couch and behind the front row couch from the back of the equipment rack. Future-proofing while I can. I did the same thing from the equip rack up the the screen, projector, and lighting control box.
post #104 of 139
nice job! i like the way you cut you light boxes in to the side ...keep the pics coming
post #105 of 139
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I figured once the 1.5" of decking were in place on the top and on the stair, that would about put the light right in the middle of the riser. It was much easier and consistent to cut that way. Used my circular saw for the sides, then the oscillating tool for the bottom cut.
post #106 of 139
Looks great. Are you planning to run power to the floor under the seats?
post #107 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowger View Post

Looks great. Are you planning to run power to the floor under the seats?

Thanks! Yes, actually if you look closely at the photo, you will see some yellow 12/2 in the middle (about a foot to the right of the conduit), with another branch running to the front which will be behind the front row. It will be easier to see in the next pics I post. Got the R30 insulation put in last night, ready for decking.
post #108 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quick question.
Lets pretend for a minute that I know nothing about bass traps and acoustic treatments. Is there any benefit to adding some openings to the front and/or rear of the riser? I have seen on some builds where they do this with register vents, but I was not sure of the logic behind it. I guess now would be the best time, before I button up the riser.
Any input would be appreciated!
post #109 of 139
Thread Starter 
The riser is filled and covered. The second layer of decking made quite a bit of difference in the stiffness. I am planning on creating a bullnose for the edges, which is why it is cut flush. Probably try and create something similar to what Mario did in the Cinemar build on his steps, although the tread on these will be carpet.


R30 was used to fill the cavities.



Roof felt going on between the second layer. First layer was glued/screwed.


Final product. Ended up just ripping down some 2x10's for the step treads.
post #110 of 139
Thread Starter 
The basic column construction is done. I still need to cut the opening in the bottom for the fabric panel and add the box up top for the light. There will also be lots of trim/crown/base molding that still needs to be done. But at least the super messy part is finished. MDF is some dusty stuff, esp when using the flush trim router bit. I hung a tarp over the entrance just to keep the dust from polluting the rest of the basement. Here are some pics. Basic 3/4" MDF construction with 1 1/4" pocket screws. .

The three pieces awaiting assembly. I had created a long 8' + straight edge using some aluminum stock, which helped when lining these up. I also used it as a straight edge for the saw.



My first pocket hole. The jig really does make it easy. I applied some wood glue, then clamped and drove the screws in.



The two columns up front, along with my mess.



Along the right side.



The two rear as well as the right side column. The one along the steps is about half of the depth of the others. It would have stuck out too far on the step if I made it the full width. This way at least it will break up that wall and look more uniform.

Edited by craig72 - 7/12/13 at 5:21am
post #111 of 139
Thread Starter 
I got the front of the theater cleaned out and re-hung the temporary screen. I'm hoping to pick up some 4x8 sheets of birch plywood this weekend to start working on the front of the room. The screen I am planning on is a 115" 2.35:1. Ignore the funky colors on the soffits.. fight gone bad with some paint.rolleyes.gif

post #112 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by craig72 View Post

Speaking of drywall, I just got a quote from Missouri Drywall for my needs. They are actually cheaper than the two big box stores, and they will put it in the basement (SCORE!) for a nominal fee.


My order is shaping up as such:
76 sheets of 1/2" 4 x 12
20 sheets of 5/8" 4 x 12
2 sheets of 1/4" 4 x 10


I REALLY didnt want to carry all of that. I might pull the trigger this week and have it in the basement before the weekend

I will probably hold the theater until the end, just to allow my brain to wrap around anything I might be missing.

Yeah, I just made this decision too. For about $1.50/sheet, which comes out to $70, they will haul 3000# of drywall across town, unload it off the truck, and drop it inside my theater. So worth it. My pickup truck can't haul all the drywall with 1 load anyway, and I'd have to make a custom rack so that the sheets would fit above the wheel wells.

On a side note, I moved one 70lb sheet by myself (from garage to basement) and that was a huge pain. I also moved 2 sheets at once with my neighbor, also a pain.
post #113 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

Yeah, I just made this decision too. For about $1.50/sheet, which comes out to $70, they will haul 3000# of drywall across town, unload it off the truck, and drop it inside my theater. So worth it. My pickup truck can't haul all the drywall with 1 load anyway, and I'd have to make a custom rack so that the sheets would fit above the wheel wells.

On a side note, I moved one 70lb sheet by myself (from garage to basement) and that was a huge pain. I also moved 2 sheets at once with my neighbor, also a pain.

I really had no way to haul the 12' anyway, and having them put it in the basement was a HUGE help. Hell, just putting one of the 5/8" x12' on the lift was bad enough! Have fun drywalling!
post #114 of 139
Thread Starter 
Two beautiful sheets of 3/4" birch made their way to the theater yesterday. Board number one is on the saw horse. Hoping to make some progress tomorrow on the first side cabinet. I'll post updates as I can.

As a side note, Menard's has a hell of a sale on a 40 piece router bit set. $29.98. Comes in a wood case and all. Sure not top quality, but for what I need, this will more than fit the bill. Extra 15% if you make it this weekend with the bag sale they have going on.
Have a good weekend!

[]http://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/power-tool-accessories/router-bits/40-piece-router-bit-set/p-1465706-c-10080.htm[/URL]
post #115 of 139
Thread Starter 
I have a couple of Irwin Quick-Clamps that I have been using in the basement for some time now. The other day, I noticed that my 12" clamps were not holding very well. Turns out that the hours of cutting and routing MDF and other woods finally took its toll. For about 5 minutes of work, I was able to take the cover off of it and remove the insides and clean them really well. Compressed air does a great job of cleaning all of the dust out of the springs and other internals. I pulled the casing completely off and cleaned and sanded the I-Beam (to scuff the surface a bit) and reassembled. They work as good as new! Just a tip if you notice your clamps starting to slip, as these things are not cheap!
post #116 of 139
Thread Starter 
Made some progress on the left cabinet this weekend. I was pretty happy with how it has turned out so far. One more to go. I used a 6 foot piano hinge on the door. Once everything is painted black, it should blend in nicely. The top and bottom of the cabinet line up with the base and crown molding that will be going in. I still need to cut the openings for the speakers, but I'll probably do all of the fabric once I get the other one done, and I'll do these and the columns at the same time.







This was the 6 foot piano hinge from Rocker. I found out that we have a store right here in town. That place is awesome!


It was a challenge to route the groove for the hinge as none of my angles were standard. I built a jig for the router table and enlisted the help of my bride along with using both in and out feed rollers to make sure everything stayed flush while cutting.


Put one of the speakers in to check fit with the shelf to make sure i could get it in and out. The shelf helps provide some rigidity to the outside panel, but will also serve as a place to stack the corner bass traps.





One down, one to go. Pretty exciting to see it start to take shape.
post #117 of 139
Wow, nice work with that big piano hinge! Looks like it all fits perfectly together...
post #118 of 139
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bryan. Yeah, it did line up really nice. When the door closes, you almost can't see the seam. I've started cutting the pieces for the second cabinet. Lets hope it goes together just as well. I'm think I might use three sets of magnets embedded in the wood as a latch, but no rush on that.
post #119 of 139
Thread Starter 
The right side cabinet is up. Went a bit quicker since I had already been through the process. Next up is the top part of the enclosure. I have an idea in my head.. pulling the damn thing into reality will require killing some brain cells. I will need to have access to the center channel speaker, so I have to have a way to get inside. The three screen wash lights will also be installed.





One with the doors open..



And closed. The seams should disappear pretty well once its all complete.
post #120 of 139
Looking good! Very interested to see what you'll do for the center cabinet...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › The Theater formerly known as Basement