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How well do "you" see color. - Page 2

post #31 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by JlgLaw View Post

Interesting, I wonder why so many of us had problems with Blue/Green? Is that age related?


Jim

I just did the test on a 60'' kuro and scored 17. All my blue/green was fine but got a couple wrong at the begining of reds.
Looking at any of my non-pro calibrated displays, I sort of expected a problem here. I believe I've been a bit off, in one way or another, all of my life...but I'm OK with it if you'd like to blame your problem on age
post #32 of 218
So then all of us Blue/Green deficient guys are related!


Jim
post #33 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52 View Post

I just did the test on a 60'' kuro and scored 17. All my blue/green was fine but got a couple wrong at the begining of reds.
Looking at any of my non-pro calibrated displays, I sort of expected a problem here. I believe I've been a bit off, in one way or another, all of my life...but I'm OK with it if you'd like to blame your problem on age


I think the size of the display also played a role for me, I scored slightly better on my 60" Pio Elite than I did on my 24" monitor. (I may also have to credit Jeff (umr), for the accurate calibration of that Elite.)


Jim
post #34 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by JlgLaw View Post

So then all of us Blue/Green deficient guys are related!


Jim

The genes for red / green color receptors are on the X chromosome. Men are XY and women XX. Therefore,if there is a subtle abnormality in a red / green receptor it will exhibit a phenotype in a male, but will likely be masked in a female because she will have a another color receptor gene on the other X chromosome. Basically, women on average have better color discrimination then men
post #35 of 218
I'm not sure my monitor isn't part of it, not an excuse.

Art
post #36 of 218
Scored 6. Took about 20 minutes. I wonder how the test will be modified for 3D.
post #37 of 218
I got 19, on my laptop with the brightness turned down
post #38 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich View Post

Scored 6. Took about 20 minutes. I wonder how the test will be modified for 3D.

As you click each box it would almost magically appear to float across your screen.

Art
post #39 of 218
My score was 4 with the misses all in the row that I didn't bother to double-check . Getting a typical computer display to do justice to this is hard. I suspect more of the credit for my reasonable score goes to my Sony Z laptop's great display (though uncalibrated as yet) than my eyesight .
post #40 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Gouger View Post

id be curious how some of the ISF guys who work with color for a living do with this test.

I sure hope they use an instrument to judge the colors and not their eye! But the test is pretty good to see what their IQ is. Because if they are half smart, they would use said instrument to cheat and get perfect score .
post #41 of 218
4 on a uncalibrated hp laptop in about 5 minutes...dang blue/green! LOL
post #42 of 218
8 - better than I thought I'd do...
post #43 of 218
4 in about 5 mins on an uncalibrated display. i will redo it tomorrow using a radiant colourimeter at work!!!
post #44 of 218
I've tried this test 3 times now. 17 15 and then 8

I'm not used to looking at these scales but think a certain amount of getting a good score has more to do with practice then having young or old eyes.

And yes....I was rather bored tonight!
post #45 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52 View Post

I've tried this test 3 times now. 17 15 and then 8

I'm not used to looking at these scales but think a certain amount of getting a good score has more to do with practice then having young or old eyes.

That's surprising that people's scores improve with successive tries ("practice")--unless they are more careful/pay more attention each time....? I mean, the colors you see are the colors you see, regardless of how many times you look at it (or is there something I'm missing...?).

I did it just once; looking at the blocks very carefully, it was fairly easy (for me) to distinguish the hue gradations (i.e., I'd scan the row, and if an adjacent pair didn't look quite right, after a couple seconds of looking at them closely I could tell if they were in the right sequence or not). Took about 10 minutes, maybe a little less.
post #46 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by rider View Post

That's surprising that people's scores improve with successive tries ("practice")--unless they are more careful/pay more attention each time....? I mean, the colors you see are the colors you see, regardless of how many times you look at it (or is there something I'm missing...?).

I did it just once; .

No idea what your experience is with these kind of scales but since you did the test but once and scored perfect a subsequent test can show no improvement, only a repeat of your past performance or a mistake. Apparently I made fewer mistakes after the initial test by looking more carefully. I'd bet I could eventually score this thing perfect too, once I got the hang of it.
What came naturally to you may require practice in others. That is if you were new to something like this as well!

This test, being in a high end display forum, will probably tend to show higher scores then if you placed it somewhere else.
I have a feeling most here have tried to set up their own displays before with scales such as this one.
Personally, I have avoided doing this task properly, exactly because of these type of scales.
I'm sure you don't even understand this type of thinking, I can explain but it's a long story.
You see it all started one day in kindergarden....
post #47 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52 View Post

No idea what your experience is with these kind of scales but since you did the test but once and scored perfect a subsequent test can show no improvement, only a repeat of your past performance or a mistake. Apparently I made fewer mistakes after the initial test by looking more carefully. I'd bet I could eventually score this thing perfect too, once I got the hang of it.
What came naturally to you may require practice in others. That is if you were new to something like this as well!

That was the first time I'd taken or seen anything like this test...actually never taken any type of "color" test before.

Not trying to be facetious, but since you said you "made fewer mistakes after the initial test by looking more carefully," it sounds like you're practicing being more careful (which is different than "practicing" color perception, which was the original thing that didn't make sense to me).
post #48 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by rider View Post

That was the first time I'd taken or seen anything like this test...actually never taken any type of "color" test before.

.

Maybe you have never looked at scales as a test but have you attempted display calibration using the standard scales before or was this really something new to you?
post #49 of 218
Only '8' here.....putting it down to a long day looking at a LCD screen!
post #50 of 218
I've only done the first row, but got it perfect. Interesting how as you get closer with a bunch of the squares how a misplaced one really sticks out of the row. (well, to me at least anyways).

Need to do the next three rows, but not before breakfast and coffee..

I have an old Dell LCD monitor, wonder if the results would change if I put back my CRT.
post #51 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52 View Post

Maybe you have never looked at scales as a test but have you attempted display calibration using the standard scales before or was this really something new to you?

Only color calibration I've done is on my PJs, using those tinted cellophane filters that come with the calibration DVDs...those didn't use gradation scales.
post #52 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curt Palme View Post

Interesting how as you get closer with a bunch of the squares how a misplaced one really sticks out of the row.

That's what I found....
post #53 of 218
I didn't really take this test that seriously, but to my surprise I scored perfect. I use a 22 inch Samsung monitor, completely uncalibrated. The blue/green ones were really tough though.

Sometimes two squares would seem identical next to each other, but when I switched them I could tell it was wrong. So, apparently I can't tell some colors apart side by side, but when I look at the adjacent colors I can somehow tell which is the right or wrong change in gradation.
post #54 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by King George II View Post

I didn't really take this test that seriously, but to my surprise I scored perfect. I use a 22 inch Samsung monitor, completely uncalibrated. The blue/green ones were really tough though.

Sometimes two squares would seem identical next to each other, but when I switched them I could tell it was wrong. So, apparently I can't tell some colors apart side by side, but when I look at the adjacent colors I can somehow tell which is the right or wrong change in gradation.

I think the test is designed that way. FWIW, one of my employees is color blind. I showed the test to him. He could only see differences in no more than a third of the colors. He didn't want to take the test, but I doubt he could score any better than 600. I'd love to see the curve for scores. I also bet that taking the test in a controlled lighting environment with the real 'blocks' and not a computer screen is a bit easier. My guess is that anything under 10 or 20 on a computer is pretty much ideal color vision. Yet, it's just a guess.
post #55 of 218
I scored "zero - You Have Perfect Color Vision."

I'm age 46, FWIW.

(I do very well on hearing tests too, so I'm lucky in some ways with my senses at my age. Now if there were some way to better my memory...)
post #56 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

I scored "zero - You Have Perfect Color Vision."

I'm age 46, FWIW.

(I do very well on hearing tests too, so I'm lucky in some ways with my senses at my age. Now if there were some way to better my memory...)

As Bernie said "at least it's not the old joy stick"

Art
post #57 of 218
Da wizrds won the lottery. so everyone here could eventually score a 0. Personally, the test really doesn`t mean anything. Taking it once is more than enough. Though I suppose taking it over and over might be more useful than reading this thread.

Alan is being stangely silent. I do suppose since he thinka poor score might be expected. s the expanded color gaumet of LED machines looks quite delicious even though those colors do not correlate to anything meant to be in the source, Just messing with the boss.
post #58 of 218
There is something to doing it again...went from 7 to 0.
post #59 of 218
At age 46, scoring is still important.

I watched the TEST last night. The Celtics won. The Celtics won. The Yankees lost.
post #60 of 218
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich View Post


Alan is being stangely silent. I do suppose since he thinka poor score might be expected. s the expanded color gaumet of LED machines looks quite delicious even though those colors do not correlate to anything meant to be in the source, Just messing with the boss.

Mark Im waiting until I can run it through the Teranex
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