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How Good is Your Hearing - Take the Hearing Test! - Page 2

post #31 of 165
Pretty interesting.

I'm 27, and have damaged my ears a bit by a few stints of shooting without hearing protection. It's VERY hard for me to discern someone talking next to me in a noisy environment, but my overall hearing is what I'd say average for my age. I'm doing this test on my laptop, in a not so quiet room, with my Bose 'on the ear' style headphones.

The best I can clearly hear is 18Khz, but I can still barely hear up to 22Khz. Not well, but I can. Oddly enough, the only tone I can't hear is 20Khz... but I can hear the others. Strange, huh?
post #32 of 165
18k if I turn it way up, 16k at normal volumes @44
post #33 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick View Post

donreyno, your hearing is lying to you! It is a function of volume. It doesn't just drop off like a cliff at some frequency. And it's generally not identical for both ears.

- Terry

I dont quite understand your comment....are you saying it is or it isnt a function of valium?
post #34 of 165
20k ... I'm 52.

Best,

Mike
post #35 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick View Post

It is a function of volume. It doesn't just drop off like a cliff at some frequency.
- Terry

I thought the hair cells in the inner ear were each 'tuned' to a specific freq, and once hair cells at a given freq die you can no longer hear that freq (regardless of volume)...and that the higher-freq hair cells atrophy with age....is this incorrect?
post #36 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick View Post

donreyno, your hearing is lying to you! It is a function of volume. It doesn't just drop off like a cliff at some frequency. And it's generally not identical for both ears.

- Terry

soooo....after the valium increase I always intruct my fellow friends to point me AWAY from frequincy cliffs and especially ALL other cliffs,whether I am looking left or right....seriously tho, I had some permanent hearing loss as a child...tubes in both ears 3 times finally culminating in removal of adnoids and tonsils...soooo could it be that there is a a very rapid decline ( AKA a freuency Cliff) for me? or does your experience and education allow for such things?...I would hate it if my ears were always lying to me.....I think the whole concept behind this 'Mosquito noise ring-tone' thing is the most fascinating thing above what we can/cannot hear but,rather, how it can be used aginst/for someone is what intrigues me
post #37 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by rider View Post

I thought the hair cells in the inner ear were each 'tuned' to a specific freq, and once hair cells at a given freq die you can no longer hear that freq (regardless of volume)...and that the higher-freq hair cells atrophy with age....is this incorrect?

Not completely ... depends on level and chroncity of exposure to loud sounds. The general effect of aging on hair folicles in the inner ear is for them to became stiffer and less responsive over time. This has more impact at higher vs lower frequencies. Multiple exposures to loud noise without ear protect can cause the cells with folicles to weaken and die in addition to normal effects of aging.

Here is another site which seems to be better for assessing hearing on-line.

http://deafness.about.com/gi/o.htm?z...w/hearing.html

Mike
post #38 of 165
39

I can hear 19khz with headphones on.
that is how they do the yearly hearing test at my work.
post #39 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by RodK View Post

that is how they do the yerly hearing test at my work.

I hope not. The test gear I have seen uses a calibrated system to make sure you hear all the tones at the same level, that your PC doesn't resample (poorly) to 48Khz as many do causing spurious other frequencies, and that a known headphone is used which has calibrated response.

These tests should be for fun, not for scientific/medical value. You can get semi-formal results with a box like I have: http://mixonline.com/products/review...ies_reference/

Alas, they seem to be out of business now but maybe there are other products like it.
post #40 of 165
I just meant wearing headphones as opposed to listening through speakers
post #41 of 165
60yrs
12khz
post #42 of 165
26yrs

22khz


M
post #43 of 165
54. 10khz.

Damn Rock and Roll!!!!!!!!! Damn you Led Zeppelin! Damn you Pete Townsend!!!!!!!!!


The areas of the basilar membrane closest to the oval window are most sensitive to high frequencies. These are also the areas that are subjected to the highest internal pressures. As we age, the cilia age but also the membrane itself ages. It is the responsiveness of the membrane that causes shearing and depolarization. Age impaires the membranes ability to respond to HF waves. Males may suffer increased HF loss due to the effects of testosterone on the basilar membrane.

My wife can hear up to 22 khz but she is only 30.
post #44 of 165
This is why endless arguments about the superiority/inferiority of headphones is flawed. Everyone's response curve is different. What sounds muddy to one person is sweet to another.
post #45 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star56 View Post

54. 10khz.

My wife she is only 30.

Your doing alright in my book.
post #46 of 165
Almost 60.

Can hear 12KHz easily, not 14Khz, but who knows how much of this is the cheap computer earphones I'm trying this on rather than my ears. Will have to test with a better headset.

But when actual formal hearing tests are done, the curves that get generated are based on the threshold of hearing sounds at particular frequencies: in other words, the lowest level at which you can hear a particular frequency.
post #47 of 165
18k is the last one I can hear, drops off completely for 19k. Kinda depressing, cause now I will always wonder what 19k sounds like. Would it be more annoying than 17k?

I'm 29
post #48 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike C View Post

Your doing alright in my book.

God Bless America
post #49 of 165
12
59 years old

can almost and sometimes hear 14 but I might be imagining/wishing for it
post #50 of 165
This test honestly hurt my ears.



If you have sensitive ears, make sure you turn down the volume, or just don't listen to it at all.

30 minutes later my right ear still hurts.
post #51 of 165
Age: 41

15 khz Left
14 khz Right

* tried again at slightly higher volume and can hear 16 khz in both ears .

Car audio SPL drags for several years but don't know if that made it worse or not. Plus I hear sinus problems in general can alter/damage your hearing and I have horrible sinus issues (frequent sinus infections due to deviated septum and severe allergies).

I guess I should be thankful though because my eyesight is better than 20/20 in both eyes.

Jason
post #52 of 165
20k (barely) both ears, age 45
post #53 of 165
No matter how hard I press my ear to the monitor, I can't hear a thing.
post #54 of 165
14k @ moderate levels, 17k @ high levels

47 year old male

I don't know how my environmental exposures compare to others, however I think they are significant. Since I was a teen, I've photographed and made high quality "purist" stereo recordings of locomotives, primarily steam, but all types. I've mixed FOH sound beginning in the late 80s thru today. I've mixed in every venue size with the exception of stadiums. In the early stages of high end auto sound, I had a '76 Chevette, w/ a high power bi-amped, Alpine based, sound system. It was a non-resonant, "hi fi" rig, with a custom sealed 10" IB sub in the back, and up front 5" low mids, and a combo 1.25" dome highs, and ribbon super tweeters. The dome and ribbon were a combo, self contained piece, that I surface mounted on the dash and toed in pointing at me. I was one proud owner and everyone that had the pleasure of hearing it couldn't believe the detail,...top to bottom. .....Ok, point being, I listened loud and everything but the sub was very "nearfield".

I worked every concert, monster truck event, and NFL game, @ the RCA Dome (prior to it's demise, generally regarded as the loudest indoor stadium in the league) For the Colt's games I was in the bowl, high up in what we called the 'A" frame. It's where the NFL officials, team video, and pyro operators resided on game days, 8-10 people total. I stood between the clock operators and the scoreboard operator. My responsibilities were the play and game clock, scoreboard, and in house video rf distribution and TVs, including the ancient Diamond Vision screens. .....Once again, point being, that stadium was extremely loud, much more so than modern stadiums, including Lucas Oil Stadium. Oftentimes we'd have tell yell into each others ears, only having to repeat it again. Very, very exciting atmasphere however.

Powerful auto sound, Railfan, FOH mixer, racing fan, Stadium events of all types, construction, I've tried to protect my ears every chance I can, but I'm just sayin'...
btw...,in construction there are a variety of very loud things, but has anyone here ever heard a steel chop saw? Carpenters use them to cut metal studs and some very rough pipe fitters may use them to cut angle iron etc..., regardless, they can be DEAFENING!

Thanks
post #55 of 165
52

16k
Using Ultimate Ears sfi5pro's >MacBook Pro in iTunes.
post #56 of 165
Man I'm bummed. I'll be 50 next week and can only hear to 10kHZ.
I still remeber that ELO/Heart concert in '78. My ears rang for 3 days.
I went to ton of concerts in the 70's/80's. Lots of loud car stereo's too.
post #57 of 165
16khz age 35. I'm abroad working at the moment, using a creature headset on my laptop, not sure it can actually play above 16khz - so testing once I get home!

Here's a chart that shows the fundamental frequencies + harmonics of those.

post #58 of 165
16k with high volume on my computer. 15k and moderate volume. 66. Spent 20 years in the AF working on Avionics on jet aircraft. I am glad that I always used both ear plugs and head set.
post #59 of 165
This test is depressing. I thought my hearing was great. I thought wrong.
post #60 of 165
Wish I never taken the test. Que?
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