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What's the best setting for the Backlight ?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
My backlight goes from 0 to 100. Right now I have it set at 55. Default is at 70. It's a Toshiba btw.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by hn333 View Post

My backlight goes from 0 to 100. Right now I have it set at 55. Defult is at 70. It's a Toshiba btw.

What model is it? I use the autoview setting on my 52" a lot but in my preference mode i usually have it set somewhere between 30-45.On the 37" in my bedroom its usually around 40.I rarely wath movie mode and never sports mode but sometimes i do set it to standard on the bedroom tv if im feeling lazy and just want to brighten it up a little bit.
post #3 of 18
Pick your poison. With a high blacklight bright scenes will look awesome but your dark scenes will have a lot of light bleeding through them. On the other hand with a low backlight your dark scenes will look a lot better but else time the picture will look dim.

I personally have my backlight maxed out.
post #4 of 18
The optimum backlight level will vary depending on the viewing environment. In a brightly lit room in the daytime a higher backlight setting may be needed. At night with lights out a lower backlight. It can also depend on the model of the tv. One manufacturers 30 may be different than another manufacturers. One reason i like the autoview on the toshiba is i dont have to adjust for different lighting conditions, it does it for me. On the other hand i dont have the autoview on bedroom tv and have found 40 to work 90% of the time. Its really something that only you can determine because everybody has their own preference. Just experiment with the backlight, brightness, contrast and gamma till you get it the way you like it.
post #5 of 18
Most if not all but the cheapest HDTVs nowadays have an auto back light brightness functionality of some type.

Personal choice but it's been said before that too much backlight can also wash out detail like the brightness settings on some sets.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KVW View Post

Most if not all but the cheapest HDTVs nowadays have an auto back light brightness functionality of some type.

Personal choice but it's been said before that too much backlight can also wash out detail like the brightness settings on some sets.

You're right that most of them have an auto backlight setting but usually its in the form of an energy saver setting and all it does is turn the backlight down. Most of these i have seen simply dim the backlight without making any auto adjustments to other settings. The toshibas autoview actually adjust not only the bl but also most of your other pq settings according to lighting conditions and input source. My lg has an intelligent sensor mode thats similiar but doesnt do as good of a job. The lg also has just an energy saver setting that simply dims the backlight. The samsung i had was the same way. Just an energy saver.There may be others with autoview im not aware of but the energy savings setting and a true auto view type feature are two different things. You will not find autoview or intelligent sensor or whatever sony, samsung or others call it on most tvs and you wont find it on any of the cheaper ones.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by hn333 View Post

My backlight goes from 0 to 100. Right now I have it set at 55. Defult is at 70. It's a Toshiba btw.

i don't know about that model but many set look good at around 20-40% for dark evening viewing how you set contrat can make a differnce too


use 100% to roast chicken and wear SPF 30
post #8 of 18
The LCD set manufacturer's set backlighting to 100% in there store demo or "torch" mode in order to try and make their set's look brighter against their competition.
The disadvantage of such a high backlighting is that it reduces the lifetime of the backlighting light source and therfore the life of the set, and that it uses a lot more power.
Sets usually have the backlighting default vaule set to about 50% for Home or Standard mode. I usually start my settings at 50%,50%,50% to start with for each of my input source connections and then adjust brightness up as required and maybe more backlighting also and lastly I adjust contrast to improve blacks.
post #9 of 18
My Samsungs are on a 10-point scale. I keep one at 6 and the other at 7. This would equate to 60/70 on your 100-point scale. Everyone will have their own settings, proving it's a matter of personal preference. You need to experiment to see what's best for you and your viewing environment.
post #10 of 18
The backlight should be set to the lowest level you can still attain 30-40ftl. Ususally this is attainable on the minimum setting on a sony or samsung.

I am not familiar with your set. The best way is to get it calibrated or calibrate it yourself with a meter.
post #11 of 18
Lost of good advice so far. I have a Samsung, but owned two Toshibas in the past. 40-50 for backlight is good to retain best black level and shadow detail. Raise the contrast up between 85-95 if the overall picture is too dim.

Contrast make whites brighter and increases luminance for colors.
post #12 of 18
For LCD's/LED's, a simple answer:

Especially in dimmer to dark rooms, always turn your backlight down as low as you can tolerate.

Lower backlight levels accomplish a number of things.

All else being equal, lowering the backlight setting typically lowers energy consumption. This is not a bad thing, right?

It also can extend the useful life of your backlight source. The harder you drive your backlights, the faster they will wear out.

In a dim to dark room, the lower you have your backlight, the less chance you have of inducing eye strain.

Lowering your backlight typically gives you lower (i.e. deeper) black levels, admittedly, at the expense of some light output. This is a good thing, within reason. You don't want your backlight so low that you lose all your contrast and details are obscured.

Setting your backlight lower often helpls to minimize flashlighting, clouding, blooming, backlight bleed, and other screen uniformity issues.

Setting your backlight lower will also keep your display running cooler, which also helps when it comes to screen uniformity issues. For example, sometimes clouding becomes more noticeable on LCD's after they heat up and get good and warm.

In a dark room it is simple. Don't start at the top and work your way down, but start at the bottom and work your way up. Start at the minimum backlight setting. It may look too dim and some shadow details could be obscured. In this case, slowly raise it up until the light output is sufficiently pleasing to your eye for extended periods of viewing.

In a bright room, you can get away with using a much higher backlight setting, because flashlighting and clouding and such are not as noticeable in a bright room, and as long as the ambient light reflecting off the panel is greater than the MLL of the display, your perception of how deep the blacks are will be more a function of how dark the light absorption filter is. So you can still maintain the perception of deep blacks, even though the higher backlight is elevating your black levels (making them glow grayer).

In a dark room I found 3 or 4 out of 10 was plenty of light output on my Sammy B8500. 6 or 7 may be more than enough for the 2010 models that have a backlight that goes to 20. Typically, as a rule of thumb, you should be at less than half the max setting in a dark room.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodyjoe View Post

What model is it? I use the autoview setting on my 52" a lot but in my preference mode i usually have it set somewhere between 30-45.On the 37" in my bedroom its usually around 40.I rarely wath movie mode and never sports mode but sometimes i do set it to standard on the bedroom tv if im feeling lazy and just want to brighten it up a little bit.

Oh it's a Toshiba 40RV525R. Not the best but not bad either.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by hn333 View Post

My backlight goes from 0 to 100. Right now I have it set at 55. Default is at 70. It's a Toshiba btw.

I like to set contrast as high as possible without clipping or color-shifting near white (digital 235) and then set backlight as low as possible while getting the desired 35 to 40 fL of light output. I disable any auto-dimming backlight features. My Samsung is set to 5/10 backlight & 90/100 contrast and that gives me a little over 35 fL with a black level that is acceptable. Backlight 6 makes blacks too bright for light-controlled viewing (no direct sunlight or artificial light hits the screen). Generally, set contrast as high as possible and backlight as low as possible.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

Generally, set contrast as high as possible and backlight as low as possible.

I don't want to nitpick since high as possible and low as possible are technically the samething but in that phrasing you want to set backlight as high as possible, contrast as high as possible and brightness as low as possible.

ex. it's a night time scenes of Las Vegas, well if you calibrate backlight for "as low as possible" then you may not get any backlight bleeding or clouding but those bright neon signs aren't going to look very bright.

(for not local dimming lcd)
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SovietSlayer View Post

I don't want to nitpick since high as possible and low as possible are technically the samething but in that phrasing you want to set backlight as high as possible, contrast as high as possible and brightness as low as possible.

ex. it's a night time scenes of Las Vegas, well if you calibrate backlight for "as low as possible" then you may not get any backlight bleeding or clouding but those bright neon signs aren't going to look very bright.

You bring up a good point; however, turning the gamma setting higher will make shadow detail brighter. Also, gamma is related to black level and white level as it's the 'middle luminance level' as Samsung calls it. So, having a darker black level is acceptable as long as the white level (dependent mostly on contrast setting since backlight will be set lower) and gamma setting are both bright enough.

Brightness really only has one right setting for most TVs and so turning it too high will wash out blacks and turning it too low will clip black.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SovietSlayer View Post

I don't want to nitpick since high as possible and low as possible are technically the samething but in that phrasing you want to set backlight as high as possible, contrast as high as possible and brightness as low as possible.

ex. it's a night time scenes of Las Vegas, well if you calibrate backlight for "as low as possible" then you may not get any backlight bleeding or clouding but those bright neon signs aren't going to look very bright.

(for not local dimming lcd)

Most people run their displays far too bright for a dark room. After all, in the movie theater the light output is quite low compared to where most people run their flat panels. Likewise for home projector set-ups. People live with subdued light output in a movie theater, but they want to torch their eyes in their home.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

You bring up a good point; however, turning the gamma setting higher will make shadow detail brighter. Also, gamma is related to black level and white level as it's the 'middle luminance level' as Samsung calls it. So, having a darker black level is acceptable as long as the white level (dependent mostly on contrast setting since backlight will be set lower) and gamma setting are both bright enough.

Brightness really only has one right setting for most TVs and so turning it too high will wash out blacks and turning it too low will clip black.

The problem is if you increase the gamma to bring out the shadow detail then that in itself is going to washing out the picture. Backlight setting on the otherhand can't actually wash out the image, it can make black bleed light but it can't wash out the image.

What it comes down to is if you calibrate your display to the proper gamma, digital black and digital white then you are probably going to notice the only difference between backlight max and backlight min in your settings is a couple of points of brightness (to bring out the shadow detail). In the end, unless you have a new local led dimming lcd, you have to pick your poison because you can't have it both ways, good light output and no backlight bleeding. If anything the proper setting would be to keep it high because low light output is noticeable in every scene whereas clouding and bleeding is only in a few.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocuMaker View Post

Most people run their displays far too bright for a dark room. After all, in the movie theater the light output is quite low compared to where most people run their flat panels. Likewise for home projector set-ups. People live with subdued light output in a movie theater, but they want to torch their eyes in their home.

I would say most people who end up trying to calibrate their TVs go overboard on the brightness factor and end up setting their displays far to dim; as evident from most of the calibration settings listed here.

As for the people who don't try to calibrate their displays and run far too bright, that is mostly because of a high color temperature, not backlight setting.
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