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DLP lamp only replacement procedure and experiance

post #1 of 73
Thread Starter 

With only 3550 hours and 3 years on my Mits DLP, I decided to do a lamp replacement. What applied here should also apply to Samsung as well as other DLP's.
I did notice a drop in light output after the first 1.000 (or so) hours, though gradual, it was noticeable. After 2,000-2,500 hours it was even more noticeable, so much I engaged the "Deep Field Imager" to provide a 'boost' in contrast/brightness to help make up for the drop in light output in spite of the fact I'm not a fan of these 'gimmicks'.

 

 

Update:

 

 2 1/2 years & 2500 hrs. later, the replacement's light output has fallen below what the original lamp did after the first 3500 hrs to a point watching TV during the day has become a problem.

I did some extended searching and was very troubled in what I was seeing. Reviews on Amazon were showing numerous reports of lamp hours on these no-name replacements as short as days to weeks in the $42-$75!

This was not just a couple of entries. The other disturbing discovery was the number of complaints that the lamp received was not what was described or shown. Including ads showing photos of Phillips lamp boxes and receiving something else. 

 

I came across two interesting statements by two different sellers. Both stated a quality difference between the original Osram/Syvainia lamp and a Phillips. One even went as far as not offering any extended warranty on t non Philips lamp;

http://www.newdlp.com/MITSUBISHI-915P049010-MITS-69490-1E.htm

http://stores.ebay.com/DISCOUNT-TV-LAMPS/General-Lamp-Information.html (click on General lamp info in the lower left corner)

Quote:
1. Who makes television lamps?
There is only handful of genuine lamp manufacturers in the market such as Philips, Ushio, Pheonix, Osram, Matsushita, with Philips being the leader in the industry. There is the common misconception among customers that television manufacturers manufacture their own lamps but it's not correct. For example, all Sony televisions come with a Philips lamp. In fact around 4 out of 5 televisions in the market come with a Philips lamp.

2. Why genuine lamps?
- Brightness
Lamp is an integral part to bring outstanding brightness and color to your projected video display. Every component from the lamp, through the optics, power supply, electronics and including all processing algorithms are harmonized to give an optimum image.
- Color
Rich colors matter, but so does color uniformity. A genuine lamp guarantees the exact chemical mix and optical alignment to give vibrant and consistent color across the whole image.
- Safety
Lamps operates at extremely high temperatures, this high voltage, high pressure quartz and glass component is safe to be handled and fitted by the customer, due to the scrupulous manufacturing and testing processes employed. For peace of mind, install
only genuine parts in your television.
- Life
With a genuine lamp you can enjoy a full lamp lifespan from your television replacement lamp. Uniquely engineered to operate with the television's electrical components, only genuine lamps can assure you full life performance and keep the television warranty valid. For example Sony, Samsung, and other major television manufacturers will VOID your warranty for using counterfeit lamps. You don’t have to take our word; you can call your manufacturer to confirm!

3. Why we recommend PHILIPS?
The A.C. based high pressured lamps pressure mercury lamp for projection is a patented invention of Philips. The lamps are manufactured using high quality standards and technology. The usual life span on these television lamps are much higher than any other lamp in the market, so per the cost benefit analysis you'd be better off purchasing the Philips lamp.

4. What is Generic and why should I avoid it?
Generic lamps are built using the substandard components and build techniques that will result in a shorter life of the lamp or may even represent a safety issue. The main component of a lamp is the burner inside, and manufacturing of that is a complex task and requires high quality components. Burner in generic lamps are often made out of substandard components and does not match the required engineering capabilities, which results into less compleling colors and low lifespan. Click here for more information.
Generic Manufacturers: DNGO, Pureglare, No Lamp Brand Name Listings
The Philips conducted an independent study, undertaken by KEMA, into the quality of a range of copy lamps versus genuine lamps. The study concluded that the poor component selection and build quality, on average, reduced the brightness of the projection by over 30% to 50%. Click here to view the KEMA report!

5. For TOSHIBA lamps?
Most Toshiba televisions uses D.C. (direct current) lamp for projection. Toshiba use PHILIPS for some of their televisions as OEM, however most televisions utilize DC technology and PHILIPS does not make any DC lamps. There are only two major manufacturers of DC lamps: Phoenix & Ushio. Both lamps are designed with high quality standards and both lamps usually have same picture quality. Again BEWARE of the generic Toshiba lamps as it might affect the ballast or light engine of your television. If any seller is not mentioning the lamp brand name, you should question it... why?

Edited by videobruce - 11/28/12 at 7:01am
post #2 of 73
Thread Starter 

Before I go any further, the word 'bulb' is not used here since it is not the correct term!

Quote:
Lamp - The lamp for a TV is a sophisticated high pressure mercury vapor lamp. These lamps are made to run at high temperatures for extended periods of time. Osram and Philips are the two major OEM manufacturers of lamps. Both brands rate their lamps at 6,000 hours of life.

Selected sources for lamp replacements;
http://www.tristatemodule.com/c-168-tv-lamps.aspx

http://stores.ebay.com/DISCOUNT-TV-LAMPS

http://stores.ebay.com/Dalbani-Corporation

http://stores.ebay.com/DLPTVLAMPS

http://www.newdlp.com/main.sc

http://www.soslightbulbs.com/televisionanddisplay.aspx

 

The following is from Amazon narrowed down to 4 stars and above;

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_st?bbn=3349991&keywords=dlp+lamps&qid=1354116439&rh=n%3A172282%2Cn%3A%21493964%2Cn%3A281407%2Cn%3A172532%2Cn%3A3349781%2Cn%3A3349991%2Ck%3Adlp+lamps%2Cp_72%3A1248879011&sort=reviewrank_authority

 

Now, before someone blasts me for including e-bay, I looked closer at the actual companies "storefront" and any FAQ's or additional details about their lamps. They appear to be a cut well above the 'dime a dozen' no name Chinese 'stuff' for $40-$70. There are also many sellers in the $100 and up range selling what appears to be the same thing. I have seen the less popular RCA branded sets (among others) lamps selling for hundreds of dollars making replacement questionable.

 

There is a new name under Osram: Neolux. It appears to be a cheaper line from Osram as evident here;

http://www.replacementlightbulbs.com/lampmitsubishiwd57732915p049010.html

 

I e-mailed the company with a question about the two names. Here is the response;

 

Quote:
Hello Bruce,
Osram brand lamps are warranted for six months and are the standard, first quality lamps used by most TV manufacturers. Neolux is an aftermarket value brand product manufactured by Osram. The Neolux lamps have half of the warranty at 3 months, produce 15% less light and have 20% less life than the standard Osram lamp. With the pricing being at about 28% less this may be an attractive option for some cost conscious consumers. The only difference between Osram and Philips brand is brand preference.
Thank you,

Kat

 

This brings up another problem, these sellers can advertise a "Osram" lamp, but it could be either. I will then have to assume with a lower priced lamp, it is a Neolux. But, does buying a more expensive Osram guarantee a actual Osram??

 

 

Lastly and equally important;

You have two choices with most sets. Either get the lamp itself or get the complete lamp housing assembly. There is between a $8 and $30 difference between the bare lamp and complete assembly. My 1st replacement was just the lamp. This replacement was the entire assembly since the difference in price was $8. With some vendors, you also have a choice of a used enclosure or new which affects price. I have seen statements regarding the condition of the plastic housing after many hours of use being questionable.

What I choose, was a complete assembly. The price difference was $8 for the same lamp only. It was a Philips. 

 

 

There is a troubleshooting site for DLP RPTV's that should be helpful including those blinking LED trouble codes for the major DLP brands;
http://www.dlplampguide.com/troubleshootingguide.html


Edited by videobruce - 11/28/12 at 8:23am
post #3 of 73
Thread Starter 
Here is the cavity where the lamp assembly goes. Note the glass lens on an angle on the left hand side.
LL
LL
LL
post #4 of 73
Thread Starter 
At this stage, I must repeat what has been posted elsewhere. Do NOT touch any of the glass of the assembly with your fingers. use either fine clothe gloves or at least a couple of tissues folder in half as a 'handle' to pick up the assembly by the threaded stud at the rear of the bell housing. Finger oils shorten the lamp life. And of course you have already waited for the assembly to cool, haven't you?

The assembly opened that is held together by three plastic clips. Two on each side (above the screen in the photo) and the other, opposite of the handle. Also is a closeup of the four mounting clips that secure the lamp to the housing.

The nut at the tip of the bell housing and the screw on the side were not tight, much to my surprise. I was expecting to exert some force to 'break' (figuratively speaking) the 'bond', but they loosened very easily. The replacement lamp came with another screw and nut, but no washer.
LL
LL
post #5 of 73
Thread Starter 
There were some design changes between the original Osram and the replacement. Notable, the thickness of the bell housing and the front flat piece of glass making securing those clips somewhat more difficult since the clips didn't fit as before.
LL
LL
LL
post #6 of 73
Thread Starter 
I was somewhat surprised at the 'haze' that settled on the face of the glass 'lens' that covers the opening of the bell housing/reflector of the lamp assembly. Also, the design was changed from a 'lens' (with a interior curved surface) to a flat piece of glass.

What you see here is not a reflection, but the 'haze' that developed on the surfaces of the outer 'lens' (right photo). Other than a thicker piece of glass, the corners of the bell housing (reflector) were thicker also.
LL
LL
post #7 of 73
Thread Starter 
River Electronics recommends removal of the filter screen at the rear of the lamp housing. I didn't take a photo of the dust buildup before I vacuumed the screen, but but it was substantial. The screen is a fine mesh, trapping most of the dust that passes by across the front glass faceplate. This is the only 'forced' air that circulates around the lamp assembly. Those two large, screened openings only use convection currents. There is no fan pushing air through those. They were not dusty.
Note with the before shot, if you notice the very corner of the screen you will see the dust buildup that covered the whole screen before I vacuumed it.

If you take a closer look at the photo of the lamp mounted in the housing (2nd previous post), you will see a 'arch' to the front of the reflector on each side of the lamp assembly. Air is forced across this area in front of the actual 'bulb' within the lamp assembly. River insists this was a mistake, calling it "factory design flaw".
LL
LL
post #8 of 73
Thread Starter 
I took readings before and after with a conventional light meter. While this is not a professional calibration meter, it still shows the difference between the two lamps. Samples were from the center, all four corners and the top and bottom to compare how uniform the screen was. Here are my findings;

Before with the 'Deep Field Imager' engaged:
Natural - 78 lux (borders: 48-75)
Brilliant: - 110 lux (borders: 67-105)

After with the Deep Field Imager engaged:
Brilliant - 202 lux (borders: 130-210)

After with Deep Field Imager disengaged:
Natual - 150 lux (borders: 98-155)
Brilliant- 155 lux (borders: 105-160)

Looking at the 'Brilliant' setting, the output (in the Deep Field mode) almost doubled.
post #9 of 73
Thread Starter 
That above help site has a interesting FAQ regarding Mits sets and capacitors;
http://www.dlplampguide.com/rgmitsubishicheck.html


If anyone would like to add to this that has a Samsung DLP, please do so.
post #10 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

River Electronics recommends removal of the filter screen at the rear of the lamp housing. I didn't take a photo of the dust buildup before I vacuumed the screen, but but it was substantial. The screen is a fine mesh, trapping most of the dust that passes by across the front glass faceplate. This is the only forced' air that circulates around the lamp assembly. Those two large openings are only convection currents. There is no fan pushing air through those. These were not dusty.
Note with the before shot, if you notice the very corner of the screen you will see the dust buildup that covered the whole screen before I vacuumed it.

If you take a closer look at the photo of the lamp mounted in the housing (2nd previous post), you will see a 'arch' to the front of the reflector on each side of the lamp assembly. Air is forced across this area in front of the actual 'bulb' within the lamp assembly. River insists this was a mistake, calling it "factory design flaw".

This is the critical post in my case. Thanks once again videobruce for the efforts you put forth for us Mits owners on this site.

When I pulled my assembly out when the second lamp died, I inadvertently put my finger on that screen and right away felt a powdery substance on that finger. I concluded that it was the same powder that buiilds up in the room where I keep my cat's litter box. The filter in my central AC input doesn't capture that fine powder so it ultimately finds it's way all over the place. I also assumed that was the reason my < 1 year-old lamp burned out. The highlighted text in your message confirms this. Also, when I'd look at the assembly and lamp, I'd see what you're describing as the "forced" air-flow path. I had no idea there was forced air going though that path, I only assumed it was just another convection system for the lamp.

I've said to myself... I'm going to save some cash and buy another lamp, but I think I'll purchase an assembly from the company you mentioned. In the meantime I'm going to remove that screen.

Great thread!
post #11 of 73
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I felt it was worth replacing it now instead of waiting for it to die. I'm saving the original for a spare when and if this dies. besides, the greater light output brings new life to the set.

BTW, This works out to 2.5 cents per hour for the lamp.
post #12 of 73
I got recently ordered this one and as you can see, the screen is much courser now.
LL
post #13 of 73
Some background. TV is on 24/7 due to a disabled child that will not sleep w/o it on. It is one of the models that has the dual power lamp (150/180) and I run it on 150W.

I am over 8000 hours on my oshram bulb I replaced Feb 09 after my bulb exploded with just under 8k hours. I ordered just the bulb and had to file down the original holder. My original bulb died the day before warranty expired and Mits sent me the whole enclosure that I have as a backup.
post #14 of 73
For those interested, I came across this nice paper on UHP lamp technology and history:

http://thomann.net/uhp.pdf

Generally, at the end of a lamp's life expectancy, it will put out about half of the light that it did when new. Also some good info on spectrum, drive circuits, etc.
post #15 of 73
Thread Starter 
helihel; Where did you get this from? Obviously, they just admitted to the problem.
post #16 of 73
I got it from Amazon, it is an Osram.

http://www.amazon.com/Mitsubishi-915.../dp/B001AJ8RAA

Philips can also be ordered from Amazon but I did not know it at the time or I have ordered it instead.

http://www.amazon.com/Mitsubishi-WD-.../dp/B002Y0SQ9Q
post #17 of 73
Thread Starter 
Still looking for any Sammy owners that replaced the lamp itself as opposed to the whole assembly.
post #18 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

Still looking for any Sammy owners that replaced the lamp itself as opposed to the whole assembly.

Maybe this will help.
http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...placement&aq=0
post #19 of 73
Thread Starter 
Nice find, but there is too much 'fluff' to get to the meat & potatoes. I was looking for select pics to add to this thread.
post #20 of 73
Since I just replaced the bulb on my Samsung HL61A650 a couple of days ago I will try and help. I replaced the lamp in the assembly to make it easy but once the new one arrived I saw how easy a lamp only replacement would be.

To remove the light assembly from the TV you only need to remove one phillips screw that holds the plastic fan air exhaust bracket in place. once it is removed there is a two part metal clip that holds the light assembly in place. Push down one one clip and the other slides forward to remove the light assembly.

In my case I simply popped in the new asembly in where the old one was and was done.

Since you asked I looked at the light assembly and changing the bub in it is pretty simple.

There are two phillips screws with a bracket holding the bulb down and one more for the ground wire. There is also a small nut holding the positive wire.



After the screws holding the bulb are removed there is a metal bracket that needs to be finessed into backing off in the housing. Even after removing the two wired connections you still have to kind of force the bulb out of the housing. It is like a puzzle.

post #21 of 73
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the post. The lamp is very similar to the lamp for Mits.
(It's kinda hard to get a perspective with the housing turned in the 2nd photo.(
post #22 of 73
Thanks for the breakdown Video Bruce. Very helpful as always.
post #23 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

Thanks for the post. The lamp is very similar to the lamp for Mits.
(It's kinda hard to get a perspective with the housing turned in the 2nd photo.(

Sorry about that. My intent was to show how the metal bracket holding the bulb looked when backed out of it's original position.

If you look at the handle facing forward in the first picture it is the same at the top of the second picture. If you would like me to take more pictures let me know what perspective you would like.
post #24 of 73
Thread Starter 
Tophinator; Without the actual item in front of me, I would say if you could take shots of the housing before and after with and without the lamp assembly installed and this 'bracket' shown separately. I see the one 'clip', but is that the only one that holds the assembly to the housing?

michanecash; Glad I could be of help. It's not a complicated process, but for those less inclined, I wanted to show what it would take to do it yourself. Almost anyone can just replace the whole housing, but why not reuse it if only the lamp assembly is bad? Admittedly, for the extra $11 from the source I named, it isn't a bad idea to go that route and have a spare housing. Considering the light output change, I won't wait this long to change it out again (assuming I will keep the set, baring any major problems).
post #25 of 73
OK I took a few more shots but the wify tossed out the old light.

Replacing the bulb on a Samsung DLP
Tools Required
Housing with Bulb: Phillips screw driver
Bulb Only: Phillips screw driver, pliers


Here is the access panel/air duct on the back of the TV. You only need to remove one Phillips screw and it pulls out.



Once the access panel/air duct is removed there is easy access to the light housing. Press the lower clip down and pull the upped clip forward to disengage it.



Once the clips are out of the way simple pull the light housing out from it's mounting point.

If you have a replacement light in the housing simply push it in where the old one was. Installation is the reverse as the removal.

To remove the light from the housing you will need to remove the nut that holds the positive wire on the end of the light and the Philips screw that holds the negative wire in place. There are also two metal brackets that hold the light down to the housing. They are on oppisite corners of the light. Remove the Phillips screws then back the brackets off through the plastic housing.



Installation is the reverse of the directions above. be sure not to touch the bulb with bare hands. The oils on your skin will shorten the life of the bulb.

Here is the bulb out of the housing.



I hope this helps anyone who is about to change the bulb in their DLP TV.

Time to swap a bulb in the housing: about 2 minutes
Time to swap a bulb without the housing: about 5 minutes.

Either way it is pretty easy
post #26 of 73
Thread Starter 
The Tophinator; Thanks for the posts. I hope you vacuumed the base of the set out before you closed it up. Here is where a soft unused paint brush works wonders with a canister type vacuum cleaner.

FWIW; MCM Electronics has a 20% off sale this month with free shipping;
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/conten...ource=homepage

$82 for the lamp, $106 for the whole lamp assembly.
post #27 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

...FWIW; MCM Electronics has a 20% off sale this month with free shipping;
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/conten...ource=homepage

$82 for the lamp, $106 for the whole lamp assembly.

It is done. $105.60 to my door. Today is the last day this discount (TWENTY) is applicable. Thanks much for this info videobruce.

I wonder if it will have an updated/upgraded screen at the top of the lamp vent. When it arrives, I'll let everyone know about my MCM buying experience, and details of the assembly.

P.S. Here's a link to the Mits 57732 assy: http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/32-26615
post #28 of 73
Thread Starter 
For $24 less, I would of gone for just the lamp.
post #29 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

For $24 less, I would of gone for just the lamp.

I took your advise here:
Quote:
Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

Admittedly, for the extra $11 from the source I named, it isn't a bad idea to go that route and have a spare housing.

And well, I did save a few bucks over the Amazon price. The unit shipped yesterday, BTW.
post #30 of 73
Thread Starter 
But, yours was over twice the difference. $11, debatable, $24, no debate, but for each it's own.
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