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"In Bruges" at Best Buy - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

I don't get HBO.

For what it's worth, I was a voice coach for DEADWOOD.

!$%!^$%^!^%!$%!&!%

LOL!
Good one.

Since we are on this subject....how do feel about the use of "blue language" in Scorcese films?
Such as: Taxi Driver, Good Fellas, Casino, etc.
Is it appropriate in THESE films?
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

LOL!
Good one.

Since we are on this subject....how do feel about the use of "blue language" in Scorcese films?
Such as: Taxi Driver, Good Fellas, Casino, etc.
Is it appropriate in THESE films?

I am not so much questioning the propriety of such language in such films as saying that for me the repetitive use of such language quickly begins to grate like a noisy gong or a clanging symbol. I want to shout at the screen or TV: "Good grief, guys, can't you speak English?"
post #33 of 53
I think that the extreme use of profanity is a sign of an unsophisticated vocabulary and lack of prudent etiquette. There are so many more nuanced ways to express frustration or dissatisfaction than the old F Bomb. But if the characters are meant to be uneducated louts with insufficient refinement and social graces, then I suppose that giving them a potty mouth is appropriate from a certain point of view. But when it's every other word, I do start to roll my eyes a bit from time to time. Same thing happens when somebody can't complete a sentence without seven or eights uses of "umm" or "like." Any form of constant repetition can get to me after a while. I don't think that a desire for variety and originality in the dialogue automatically makes you a prude. An over reliance upon profanity can be accurate to the character and context, or it can just be sloppy and lazy screenwriting.
post #34 of 53
Given the immense quality of all other portions of the In Bruges screenplay, I have to imagine that the profanity was a purposeful decision and not a sign of poor or unimaginative writing skills.
post #35 of 53
Speaking of Deadwood...

It's a common problem with pay-TV series in general. They often use a lot of foul language because they can (the producers think it makes the shows "edgy" and sets them apart from their commercial TV brethren), not because it helps the scripts. In DW it was like every other word.

Use swear words too much and they lose their power to offend or startle when it's required for a story.

It's the quality usage of these "colorful metaphors" rather than the quantity that is called for.
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

"Good grief, guys, can't you speak English?"

Eric, that's absolutely RIGHT!
They CAN'T speak normal english!
That really is THE point.

These are people that were raised in the gutter and never left it....
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by giantchicken View Post

I think that the extreme use of profanity is a sign of an unsophisticated vocabulary and lack of prudent etiquette. There are so many more nuanced ways to express frustration or dissatisfaction than the old F Bomb. But if the characters are meant to be uneducated louts with insufficient refinement and social graces, then I suppose that giving them a potty mouth is appropriate from a certain point of view. But when it's every other word, I do start to roll my eyes a bit from time to time. Same thing happens when somebody can't complete a sentence without seven or eights uses of "umm" or "like." Any form of constant repetition can get to me after a while. I don't think that a desire for variety and originality in the dialogue automatically makes you a prude. An over reliance upon profanity can be accurate to the character and context, or it can just be sloppy and lazy screenwriting.

Not at all, more words in a vocabulary is a good thing.
There are no bad words only bad intentions
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvdmike007 View Post

Not at all, more words in a vocabulary is a good thing.
There are no bad words only bad intentions

This is the Post-of-the-Day.
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

This is the Post-of-the-Day.

Yep. It ranks right up there with "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get."
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

Yep. It ranks right up there with "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get."

Yup, another good one.
post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

Speaking of Deadwood...

It's a common problem with pay-TV series in general. They often use a lot of foul language because they can (the producers think it makes the shows "edgy" and sets them apart from their commercial TV brethren), not because it helps the scripts. In DW it was like every other word.

Use swear words too much and they lose their power to offend or startle when it's required for a story.

It's the quality usage of these "colorful metaphors" rather than the quantity that is called for.

Quite. Precisely one of the reasons why I can't stand nonsense like True Blood and Spartacus:Blood and Sand.

"Oooooh, we're dark and edgy!!"

Um... No.
post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul_duke View Post

True Blood and Spartacus:Blood and Sand.

For the sake of clarity....and brevity...
True Blood = Best series on TV today.
Spartacus: Blood and Sand = Worst series ever.


post #43 of 53
Perhaps I am insensitive but I confess the only profanity in In Bruges that had any impact on me was an exchange between Ken (Brendan Gleeson) and his boss, Harry (Ralph Fiennes), which made me laugh. If you are sensitive to profanity don't read it:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Ken: Harry, let's face it. And I'm not being funny. I mean no disrespect, but you're a c**t. You're a c**t now, and you've always been a c**t. And the only thing that's going to change is that you're going to be an even bigger c**t. Maybe have some more c**t kids.
Harry: [furious] Leave my kids f***ing out of it! What have they done? You f***ing retract that bit about my c**t f***ing kids!
Ken: I retract that bit about your c**t f***ing kids.
Harry: Insult my f***ing kids? That's going overboard, mate!
Ken: I retracted it, didn't I?
post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

Perhaps I am insensitive but I confess the only profanity in In Bruges that had any impact on me was an exchange between Ken (Brendan Gleeson) and his boss, Harry (Ralph Fiennes), which made me laugh. If you are sensitive to profanity don't read it:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Ken: Harry, let's face it. And I'm not being funny. I mean no disrespect, but you're a c**t. You're a c**t now, and you've always been a c**t. And the only thing that's going to change is that you're going to be an even bigger c**t. Maybe have some more c**t kids.
Harry: [furious] Leave my kids f***ing out of it! What have they done? You f***ing retract that bit about my c**t f***ing kids!
Ken: I retract that bit about your c**t f***ing kids.
Harry: Insult my f***ing kids? That's going overboard, mate!
Ken: I retracted it, didn't I?

GW, that is priceless.
Thanx for that....it's even funnier when read.
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

GW, that is priceless.
Thanx for that....it's even funnier when read.

Yeah, I thought so, too. That was one of the funniest, and most telling, exchanges between movie characters I can remember.
post #46 of 53
According to the IMDb trivia page, the F-bomb is dropped 126 times which is less than two-per-minute. How can that be considered excessive?

I did think it was interesting, with the children's fantasy film set being an important part of the plot, that four of the In Bruges actors are in the next Harry Potter film: Ralph Fiennes (Lord Voldemort), Brendan Gleeson (Mad-Eye Moody), Clémence Poésy (Fleur Delacour) and Ciarán Hinds (Aberforth Dumbledore).

Make that five if you count Stephanie Carey who played the Canadian wife/girlfriend and is an uncredited stunt performer in the Deathly Hallows. You could even stretch it to five-and-a-half, if you count the fact that Brendan Gleeson's son Domhnall Gleeson plays Bill Weasley who is, strangely enough, engaged to Clémence Poésy's Fleur Delacour character.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinema Squid View Post

According to the IMDb trivia page, the F-bomb is dropped 126 times which is less than two-per-minute. How can that be considered excessive?

So it's a three-way tie between IN BRUGES, Rahm Emanuel, and Joe Biden, eh?
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

So it's a three-way tie between IN BRUGES, Rahm Emanuel, and Joe Biden, eh?

Actually, no.
It's a tie between IN BRUGES, Dick Cheney, and John McCain.


Eric, Eric, Eric....
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

Actually, no.
It's a tie between IN BRUGES, Dick Cheney, and John McCain.


Eric, Eric, Eric....

I was going to mention those two as well, but three-way sounded better than five-way, plus Dick and John are so old no one remembers them anymore.
post #50 of 53
Have you guys ever seen "The Commitments"? I showed it to a friend, who has no foul language filter, and he said, (in laughing amazement) "Man, every other word is f**k."
It's funny that I never really noticed the language until he mentioned it. The same thing with "In Bruges", I just didn't notice. Though, "In Bruges" seemed to have less foul language.
When all your friends talk like that, then I guess it seems natural. Thankfully, my output filter still works.
post #51 of 53
Okay, I bought and rewatched IN BRUGES. And I kinda retract my comments/complaints about the over-use of the "F" word. Yes, it was used a lot, but it didn't seem nearly as intrusive this time as I felt during my first watching. Either I'm getting used to it, or I see that the dialogue really fits the characters, even to the ironic way they mocked Harry's excessive profane language in the note/telegram he sent.

Great film, great acting, and beautiful scenery. I noticed a couple film spots/tears that should have been fixed prior to finalizing the Blu-Ray, but other than those it looks pretty good. If you haven't seen this movie and you can deal with the barrage of F's, then by all means see it. You won't be disappointed.
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

Okay, I bought and rewatched IN BRUGES. And I kinda retract my comments/complaints about the over-use of the "F" word. Yes, it was used a lot, but it didn't seem nearly as intrusive this time as I felt during my first watching. Either I'm getting used to it, or I see that the dialogue really fits the characters, even to the ironic way they mocked Harry's excessive profane language in the note/telegram he sent.

Great film, great acting, and beautiful scenery. I noticed a couple film spots/tears that should have been fixed prior to finalizing the Blu-Ray, but other than those it looks pretty good. If you haven't seen this movie and you can deal with the barrage of F's, then by all means see it. You won't be disappointed.

Glad you liked it! Just checked and found the BD at Amazon for $8.95 and ordered it. Hard to pass on a price that low.
post #53 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

I see that the dialogue really fits the characters, even to the ironic way they mocked Harry's excessive profane language in the note/telegram he sent.

As a profane individual, I can say I don't like the use of F-word for its own sake.
There is a time and a place....IMO.

Hardened career criminals tend to speak with a great deal of profanity....it's just the way it is.
I believe the movie is accurate in this....it works here.
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