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Exterous' Small Theater Build - now with soda fountain construction! - Page 2

post #31 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

Very interesting! Did you retain the electrical cord behind the wall? If so did you get electrical permits for the work?

Yes - the electrical cord for the sump pump comes up from the pit and stays entirely out of sight and inside the framing of the wall. However, I can easily slide that access panel up at any time to access both the power outlet & sump power cord plugged into the outlet. If necessary I can easily unplug the cord and snake it down back into the pit where the sump pump is - say if I needed to replace the sump motor. And yes - the entire setup was designed and built by contractors, and it was approved by the electrical inspector. He had a few questions about it, but ultimately he passed it.

If you want I could take photos of the "inards" tonight or tomorrow and post them here so you can see what it looks like, but essentially it is an outlet in the wall with an access panel.

As for access to the pit itself, mine is much easier than yours as I simply have easily removable teak tile squares that snap together covering the sump pit, as it is located in the concrete under that area of the floor.
post #32 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Yes - the electrical cord for the sump pump comes up from the pit and stays entirely out of sight and inside the framing of the wall. However, I can easily slide that access panel up at any time to access both the power outlet & sump power cord plugged into the outlet. If necessary I can easily unplug the cord and snake it down back into the pit where the sump pump is - say if I needed to replace the sump motor. And yes - the entire setup was designed and built by contractors, and it was approved by the electrical inspector. He had a few questions about it, but ultimately he passed it.

If you want I could take photos of the "inards" tonight or tomorrow and post them here so you can see what it looks like, but essentially it is an outlet in the wall with an access panel.

If you don't mind that would be immensely helpful!
post #33 of 84
OK, here are some photos of the inards. The main thing I forgot is they put in a basic pvc pipe as conduit for the electric cord to snake through the floor & framing, as I hope you can see in these shots. Obviously if need be the cord can be pulled back through to the pit below and a new one snaked up. If I recall correctly, the electric inspector agreed that since it was essentially in an open nook in the wall as opposed to being inside the wall (occasionally covered of course by the simple access panel), it was allowable. YMMV.





Maybe all you need to do is add some pvc as conduit and you'll be good to go?

Hope that is of some help. Any further questions, let me know.
post #34 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

OK, here are some photos of the inards. The main thing I forgot is they put in a basic pvc pipe as conduit for the electric cord to snake through the floor & framing, as I hope you can see in these shots. Obviously if need be the cord can be pulled back through to the pit below and a new one snaked up. If I recall correctly, the electric inspector agreed that since it was essentially in an open nook in the wall as opposed to being inside the wall (occasionally covered of course by the simple access panel), it was allowable. YMMV.





Maybe all you need to do is add some pvc as conduit and you'll be good to go?

Hope that is of some help. Any further questions, let me know.

That sure does. Thanks again!
post #35 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

That sure does. Thanks again!

My pleasure. It's not often that I can be of actual help to anyone. I usually just soak up information from everyone else. I sure hope it doesn't go to my head.

My bill is in the mail.
post #36 of 84
Thread Starter 
Well, it's been slow progress. Unfortunately this month has been a tab more expensive that we had anticipated. We had to get 4 tires for my car (expected) 2 for my wife's (unexpected). Not to mention we found a great package deal for our trip to Ireland. The downfall is that they require payment in full up front so the basement budget went towards preventing a credit card balance. The fund might be replenishing in December but we'll have to see how that all pans out

Of course I also found this at a Repossession Auction site:


It was something we had been hoping to find but a working one with the pumps and carbonater for $150 was too good to pass up - doing still further damage to the basement budget in the process

I'll tell you one thing though - it's staying with the house. We have a couple at work that I investigated pretty thoroughly before buying this one. Unfortunately this lead me to make some unfortunate assumptions.

The ones at work were pretty small and lightweight even though they also had 6 pumps and an ice dispenser.

This was neither small nor light. At my best guess it weighs around 400lbs. It also barely fit in my SUV. We are talking NO height clearance and 1" width clearance. On the positive side I now know that the width clearance of my SUV = basement entrance clearance.

Amazingly enough a friend and I got it downstairs with the help of an appliance dolly without any damage to walls/floors or the fountain machine. Even so - I am not even going to attempt to get it back upstairs if I intend to preserve it's working condition

Anyway - I have made some progress with the small budget left and the materials still at hand.

My Hotlink Pro, splitter and extender arrived along with a plethora of cables, wall jacks. There is also an HDMI splitter I had laying around. Not a very exciting picture but as soon as I got new toys I started installing them in the basement



I plan on routing one of the Hotlink extenders, extra HDMI cable and zone 2 audio cables to the outside room so we can use it as an exercise area at some point



The electrical is now 90% done and the audio/visual wiring is all done. I finished running all of the data as well. I ran data to the front and to the projector - a switch in the equipment area will serve all of the equipment/data runs with a connection to the router in my office on the second floor. Thankfully I had already run the ethernet cable to the basement for my temporary setup so I didn't have to worry about that this time around. I also built the equipment shelves this weekend





The bottom shelf will house my HTPC and Media server side by side vertically so I also installed a keyboard tray I salvaged from an ancient server rack at work

I think I know one reason it the tray was going to be recycled - that sucker had some sharp edges!



There were some additional cuts on my thumbs but you get the idea. I put on work gloves after a bit and there was significantly less blood on the keyboard tray. Needless to say I have added a grinder attachment for my Dremel to my 'Need to buy' list

I think I will put my network switch on the top shelf but since I don't need front access to it I may add a shelf at the very top and put it there

All of the speaker runs have been tested as well


Obviously I will take off the face plates before drywalling but I just wanted to make sure I didn't do anything stupid here (like mix up my left and right connectors)

There isn't much left to do at this point till the budget recovers. I need to add a metal support leg to one side of the keyboard tray. I was going to use an extra 2x4 but there are some screws in the assembly that get in the way.

I also need to finish the sump pump outlet enclosure. I will need to move most of the existing lights in the basement out of the way. Unfortunately they share a circuit with the upstairs so the wires will need to be pulled. (I don't want to have to have access to junction boxes in the ceiling) Since I have no plans for overhead lights in the home theatre room I have been waiting to do that last since light will be at a premium until the sconces are installed
post #37 of 84
Thread Starter 
Well - believe it or not construction is actually progressing.

I got the breakers installed. (2) 15 amp for the lights and outlets in the room and (1) 20amp for the equipment

The insulation is progressing well and is getting close to done



It is taking longer than I thought it would - mainly because of the ceiling. I underestimated how hard it would be to put insulation in the ceiling by myself. It took a bit to get the hang of it and usually involved me stuffing one section between the joists while the remaining roll was sitting on my head

Of course the way the pipes and ducts are run are, in no way, helping either. You can see in the first picture how the flex duct is drooping below the joist. I have spent a fair bit of time nailing hangers inbetween the joists to try and elevate some of the pipes/ducts. Even so - some of my ceiling insulation rolls are bowing out some (and had a nasty habit of coming un-stuffed before I could staple them down) [I dont think the downward force is going to be a big deal once I get the 5/8" drywall up there]

I got some plastic wrapped insulation to go around the equipment area

It's actually very nice and easy to work with.

I've been holding off on the side walls because I've removed most of the overhead lights in the room (You can see a couple sitting on the back of the equipment rack in the last picture) so most of the light is coming from the storage room to the side of the theater

I left one in the front corner of the room. It is right over the sump pump access (and on a different circuit) and there will be a enclosure in front of it for the screen so you won't see it unless you poke your head back there

Gotta get one more insulation roll from Lowes and it insulation will be done.

Drywall will arrive on March 11th and will will most likely be completely hung that weekend
post #38 of 84
Thread Starter 
I just braved blizzard like conditions for what is definately on my list of very cool tools:

A collated (or autofeed) screwdriver with depth settings

It took me about 5 seconds to drive (6) 2" screws through two 2x4s. I can't wait to use it for my stage/riser construction and drywall hanging!

Did I mention that the new pictures were taken with my new Canon S95 camera that arrived Saturday? Ah - its been a good weekend for toys!
post #39 of 84
Thread Starter 
The drywall arrived on Friday and I also picked up the lift for the 1 day rental. My dad was nice enough to come down Friday and spend the weekend helping me. My brother in law was able to make it down on Saturday to help as well. Friday evening we schlepped a couple of the 26 sheets to the basement, which, unfortunately, lead to the attempted explosion of my thumb. When carrying the very first piece down the stairs I lost track of the upper edge of the drywall. It slammed into the drywall ceiling bulkhead (with metal edging strip of course) at the bottom of the stairs. The drywall, and metal edging strip was saved from damage by the squishy thing padding it - which was my thumb. It hit just past the thumbnail, forcibly separating the skin from the nail (kind of a reverse version of bending a nail back), spraying a bit of blood and causing a massive instant bruise. After the initial pain and bleeding passed it wasn't too bad if I didn't bang my thumb on anything. I wish I had an elevator

Drywall delivery:


The drywall lift was a lifesaver because those 5/8" sheets are heavy. I can't imagine how much longer it would have taken if we had had to do the ceiling all by hand.

Even so - getting the ceiling done took most of Saturday (we also got most of the rest of the drywall downstairs) Lots of long, shallow cuts because the foundation walls aren't quite square

The pace picked up today and, with one notable exception, we got a lot of sheets up pretty quickly. Even so, I want to have a talk with whoever through all those outlet boxes were a good idea. Just a couple of sheets left and that should be it. I am especially looking forward to being able to turn the breaker on and get power from the basement instead of running an extension cord up the stairs for power




We tried a couple of things to get the outlet covers marked and cut. We tried cutting s hole towards the center and then running a dremel along the sides of the box, but the dremel just cut through the plastic too easily for us to tell where the side of the box was. We could measure but that was time consuming and left more room for human error. My dad had a good idea which was to put some of my wife's unneeded lipstick around the edges of the boxes, press the drywall up against it and then cut out the mark that was left on the back of the drywall. With just a little bit of connect-the-dots this worked near perfectly.

The screw gun was awesome! While it wouldn't fit well along the tops, bottoms or corners the person with the screwgun could get the entire board done in about the same time it took the other person to put the 6 screws in along the top and bottom So thats about 30+ screws with the screwgun per 6 screws the regular way. (Thank you autofeed!)

I think I had maybe 2 miss fires for the project with the Senco so far that weren't operator error. It would have a hard time driving the screw all the way in if you weren't paying attention and tried to go in at an angle but I can't really fault it for that.

The Goldblatt Bladerunner drywall cutting tool made cutting drywall much easier too. The top scoring blade has a magnet that drags along its counter part on the underside of the drywall so you can quickly sore both sides at once. Great for cuts that were more than a couple of inches off an edge (Which, since my walls are ~93" instead of 96", was every single sheet)
post #40 of 84
Thread Starter 
Mini Update:
Just some small progress tonight but a major milestone. I did a tiny bit more drywall (Its much slower going doing it by yourself) and only have about 1.5 sheets to go before I am finished. Far more importantly I put receptacles and cover plates on the 20amp circuit in the equipment room and flipped the breaker. For the first time in more than 2 years since I setup the projector in my basement I can have power without running an orange extension cord from the main floor, through the hall and down the stairs. Yay!!!
post #41 of 84
Did that drywall cutting tool have any problems with 5/8" drywall?
post #42 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon_B View Post

Did that drywall cutting tool have any problems with 5/8" drywall?

Nope! The magnet is very strong so both pieces stayed on track and I had no issues scoring the drywall
post #43 of 84
Thread Starter 
I got the last major piece of drywall up today. There are two small pieces left to go but I will need to get my pre-hung door in first because the clearances are so tight (*Crosses fingers that there is enough room* )

I also turned the room into a level 3 biohazard zone in preparation for the drywall dust invasion. I am sure at least some will make it into the other rooms but hopefully the plastic and tape I put over every opening will keep that from happening.

Of course I noticed that some idiot had left the light on in the storage room after I covered up the doorway with plastic and tape.

The other semi-major project was creating a drywall dust filter. I didn't want to spend a lot of money on filters so I decided to go the home-made water filter method.

I got a 5 gal bucket and lid from work. I placed one end of a 2" PVC pipe I had laying around on the lid and traced one circle. It took me a bit to figure out how to cut it out with the tolls I had available. Eventually the method that seemed to work best was as follows:

-Mark outline to cut
-Trace the outline with a sharp knife, just lightly scoring the top.
-Make a second pass pushing harder. Making two passes seemed to make it easier to keep the knife on track and resulted in some pretty good circles
-Drill a large hole in the center of the piece to be cut out
-Take a jig-saw and make radial cuts from the hole out to the scored edge
-Bend the pie shaped pieces back. For me they just snapped off at the score line leaving me with a relatively circular opening in the lid

After checking to make sure the 2" pipe would fit in the hole snugly I glued a 14" long section of 2" PVC pipe to a 2" to 1-3/4" connector. I would put the connector on top of the lid to keep the PVC pipe from falling into the bucket and it allowed a very snug fit to the "2-1/4 Replacement" shopvac hose I got at HD for $18
(Shopvac replacement hoses and PVC pipes are, apparently, measured differently for advertising so this resulted in me taking the replacement hose to the PVC isle and trying out a couple of connectors until I found one that worked.)

I then cut a second hole in the lid. At first I tried just a short, lipped connector I got from Lowes but the lip wasn't long enough to keep the other shopvac hose from falling off the top of the lid so I needed to enlarge the hole so I could just insert the shopvac hose in it (I was a bit hesitant because I only had one lid and I had no idea if this would work)

Unfortunately, the hole only needed to be enlarged by about 3/16" of an inch so using the jigsaw was out. Fortunately I had a couple of old grinding bits that would work with my drill. I was able to enlarge the hole so I could shove the shopvac hose in (Although it took a bit because the bits were pretty dull)




The attachment connector on the end of my hose has some notches that allow the attachments to snap in place and this worked perfectly to keep the hose where I wanted it

I filled the bucket just over 1/3 of the way full with water and tried it out on my garage floor



You can see the water in the bucket is pretty much black while there is just a small amount of water in the relatively clean shopvac container

We'll see how well it works on drywall dust but I think my $20 ( hose + connector) filter will do pretty darn well. Plus I just need to empty the bucket and fill it with water again to clean it!
post #44 of 84
Thread Starter 
Well, believe it or not progress has been made despite the amount of time other projects have taken up. For example - this took up 3 weekends:
(1 weekend of prep 2 of travel)


Then, of course, no large project would be complete without a separate water issue:

I still haven't found the annoyingly slow leak that is coming from the master bathroom. I caulked pretty much everything in the shower. It's looking like I will have to tear down drywall in there and hope I can see the plumbing otherwise the shower/tub is going to have to come out

Then there were the two weekends refinishing the deck. I had only expected, at most, 1 but it seems the previous home owner covered up a lot of deck issues with multiple coats of opaque stain

Anyway - I finished the drywall. A couple words of advice - buy the metal tools. The plastic ones - if you use them for any length of time - will develop divots on the edge making it impossible to apply the mud smoothly.I used the mesh tape for the non-corner joints and that seemed to work well. I got very good at everything but the corners between the walls and ceiling. Those took a fair bit of extra work and I never really got into a groove with those.

The stage is framed and mostly filled with sand. Apparently I can't calculate properly the amount of sand to buy.

The subfloor is completely done. I used Dricore and it was very easy to install. Just keep in mind that their 2x2 sheets aren't actually 2'x2'. I thought I was only going to need to make a small cut on the end sheet for my 11'10" room. Imagine my suprise when I had a ~3" gap remaining. Actually, looking back, I think I knew this at one point but had forgotten it because the project is going so damn slowly.

I started on the riser construction last night and that is coming along well.

I haven't pickedup the plywood for the stage and riser yet though. I don't have a truck so I was going to borrow one and pickup my doors and plywood at the same time. Unfortunately Home Depot completely screwed up my door order (They had a free upgrade to solid core doors on all special orders a couple of weeks ago) and its going to be another 1-2 weeks before they have my new doors in. (To be fair they handled it very well and made the issue as pain free as they could)

Unless something else breaks I hope to finish the riser construction (sans plywood) and get the remaining sand this weekend. I am debating on having them cut my plywood at the store so I can take it home in my SUV but we'll see how the project progresses

Picture of stage without the sand


Picture without stage construction


(Sorry for the excessivly large pictures. For some reason Photobucket's 'resize' isn't working properly)
post #45 of 84
Thread Starter 
Lots of progress to report, along with a couple of missing photos. I had a couple of pictures of the riser under construction but they seem to have vanished.

Anyway - the riser is complete. I made it out of 2x8s and (2) sheets of 3/4" T&G plywood. I also put about eleventy billion screws in the plywood to keep it from squeaking. My Senco autofeed drill came in very handy for that - once I figured out I had to change the phillips head bit for the robison bit that the flooring screws needed! Lost a couple of WTF minutes there when none of the flooring screws were being driven into the wood

The stairs down into the room turned out better than I thought. To get the height I wanted I would need to run one sheet onto the bottom step or have a 3/4" bump from the last step down back up into the room. I was a little concerned that it might feel weird stepping down but I don't even notice it. You can see the plywood on the step in the picture below



As you can see I finally have a door. Not the one I ordered though - even the second go around. For some reason when Home Depot changed the order to correct the door sizes they changed one door from a 6 panel to a 3 panel. Of course it was the main door into the home theater that didn't match the other 18 doors in my house.

I thought about keeping it but with the steps down and the way the design of the 3 panel door made the entry way look really bad. So I went back to Home Depot and they agreed to deliver a new door and pick up the old one. They had a more expensive one in stock (I just have to paint it) and agreed to deliver that one the next day (no extra cost for the door or delivery). I'll give them this - they keep screwing up but they keep trying to make it right.

Of course I didn't notice the hardware was brass but at this point I don't care. One interesting thing is that this door is actually 2" wider than the last one. Both had 36" wide labeled on them but I was going to need to stick a 2x4 on the wall to make the other one fit (I had gotten it all the way downstairs and measured to fit before I noticed it was a 3 panel door. Don't ask me how I missed that....). The new one fits very snugly in the frame. Maybe the other one was measured 36" from outside to outside and this one is a 36" door? I don't know and I don't even care at this point. It will make finishing around the door a tad challenging but I don't even care. At least the door handle lines up perfectly with the striker panel which is more than I can say for the other one. That one came crooked from the factory. if I were going to use it more I would complain but it's just going into a little used storage room so I'll deal with the slight issue it has latching when closing it.



I finally got the stage filled with sand - after about 4 sand purchases. I really suck at calculating cubic feet of sand required. I am little short on plywood for the stage because apparently T&G plywood does not actually come in 4x8 sheets. They are 47" wide. Here I thought I had planned out my cuts perfectly - and I would have too if they had been 48". As it is I have a sheet that won't quite work to cover the stage. I'll have to see if if I can find a smaller sheet of plywood somewhere. I definately don't need an entire 4x8 sheet.

On a side note - I have a lot of tiny, left over pieces of wood from my project. The room dimensions being slightly lower than 8' ceilings, slightly narrower than 12' walls etc has left a lot of small scraps. I'll have to find a bon fire to donate them too

The front of the sofit is up. I am going to hang the screen behind it so that will cover the screen housing and the light over the sump pump. I figure I can also put my left over insulation in it for whatever (if any) acoustic help that might add.

Putting that thing up and the doors by myself was a bit of a challenge.

I screwed up on the drywall around the door to the storage area. I am going to have to cut some small pieces and screw them in there because the trim isn't going to be big enough to cover the gap I left. Live and learn!



I have some detail work to do around the door - once I figure out what I am going to do there but other than that the back of the room is ready for paint.

The projector mount is on the way and I am pretty sure we have settled on sconces for the room. I'm going to double check with the wife and, unless she has changed her mind, I'll pick those up this weekend.
post #46 of 84
Thread Starter 
More progress!

I got new bulbs for my work light. When I took the old ones out they didn't look burned out but the white plastic on the ends of the bulb had shattered. I am wondering if they just got too hot or if maybe the quality of the bulbs wasn't very good. Regardless the mudding is mostly done. I have to sand and then do some touch-ups in a couple of areas but that's it.



I had to redo the lid over the sump pump because I had forgotten to leave 1" of space for carpet when I cut it. I am not 100% sure how the installers would handle it but even if they didn't need the lip because it needs to be able to move it now matches the rest of the stage and I had the wood available (old one on the left)



I stopped by Lowes and picked up the lights. Unfortunately they only had 4 of the 6 we need. My wife will be by another on this weekend and will pick up two more then.



These should go well with the brown fabric covered frames I will eventually put up. I am not going to be able to cover much of the room with them so the fabric won't be too overwhelming. Probably just a couple at the reflection points and maybe on the back wall. We'll have to see what the readings are when I get to that point

As for paint - we settled on Nightscape. Its not as dark as I would like (dark gray) but it's much darker than my wife wanted (and I had to get her to give in on making the ceiling that dark too)

http://www.lowes.com/pd_94101-4-5002...lues%7CValspar

I started cleaning up the tools and materials in the basement and boy did I amass a stockpile of stuff down there! The toolboxes in the garage are starting to fill back up.

I am really hoping to be able to prime the walls on Wednesday
post #47 of 84
Exterous, your theater is coming along great. I know what you mean about the two years going by and still not being done. I'm right at the two year mark now but, like you I think its going to go faster now...at least I hope so.

I really like your equipment rack. I plan to build my own equipment rack as well and have been trying to figure out the shelf mounting method...then seeing yours, now I know. Thanks,

Dale
post #48 of 84
Thread Starter 
I primed the walls last night! Unfortunately 1 gallon wasn't enough to cover the walls AND ceiling but the walls are done. I had them tint the primer(They said they could do it some but could not match the color) so the walls are a light blue now. I felt like I should be painting a room for a baby boy or something. I am hoping that with the primer on and tinted the paint might last for the entire room but we will have to see
post #49 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

I primed the walls last night! Unfortunately 1 gallon wasn't enough to cover the walls AND ceiling but the walls are done. I had them tint the primer(They said they could do it some but could not match the color) so the walls are a light blue now. I felt like I should be painting a room for a baby boy or something. I am hoping that with the primer on and tinted the paint might last for the entire room but we will have to see

Pictures or it didnt happen....lol.

Paint always goes a lot further than primer on bare drywall. But dont be suprised if you need multiple coats. Especially if you go with darker colors. (or red)
post #50 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvmiller View Post


I really like your equipment rack.

Dale

+1 to that. Very clever and really clean looking. I'm building a theater with a friend of mine in his basement...i may steal your design for his rack.
post #51 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvmiller View Post

Exterous, your theater is coming along great. I know what you mean about the two years going by and still not being done. I'm right at the two year mark now but, like you I think its going to go faster now...at least I hope so.

I really like your equipment rack. I plan to build my own equipment rack as well and have been trying to figure out the shelf mounting method...then seeing yours, now I know. Thanks,

Dale

Yeah - there have been certain points where it has just dragged and others where it has flown by. I just hope I can keep the pace up! Good luck on yours!

I am glad you like the rack. It was pretty cheap. I already had the wood and got the brackets from a local reuse center for $0.25 a bracket. They don't all match and I had to slightly bend a couple of them so they fit in the support but its not like anyone is really going to see them anyway. I don't remember how much I paid for the vertical mounting rails or whatever they are called but it wasn't that much.

I have been looking around for face plate ideas (Since i didn't want to pay for some of the pre-made ones) and came across this thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=990179

Starting at post 12 there is a very very nice way to make a face plate. I also want to put a tinted glass IR transparent door over the components so the lights don't shine into the room during the movie so I am going to see if I am smart enough to somehow marry the two ideas together
post #52 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by premiertrussman View Post

Pictures or it didnt happen....lol.

Paint always goes a lot further than primer on bare drywall. But dont be suprised if you need multiple coats. Especially if you go with darker colors. (or red)

Heh - if I remember tonight I will take pictures. I was surprised at how much the drywall sucked up the primer. I may go ahead and see how far I can get on the gallon of paint. I'll start with the walls. That way if I get to low and have to get another for the ceiling I don't have to worry about the tinting being slightly off

Quote:
Originally Posted by premiertrussman View Post

+1 to that. Very clever and really clean looking. I'm building a theater with a friend of mine in his basement...i may steal your design for his rack.

By all means! Besides - after I came across YW84U's rack I realized my cheap idea wasn't as ingenious as I had originally thought
post #53 of 84
Cool face plate idea....how would a DIYer cut aluminum cleanly like that thought? I didnt see where he mentioned what he used to cut it.
post #54 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by premiertrussman View Post

Cool face plate idea....how would a DIYer cut aluminum cleanly like that thought? I didnt see where he mentioned what he used to cut it.

I believe he used a jigsaw. Just get a blade for cutting metal and some really fine grit sandpaper for any barbs that you might get from cutting
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

I believe he used a jigsaw. Just get a blade for cutting metal and some really fine grit sandpaper for any barbs that you might get from cutting

I was thinking a jig saw too....its just hard to get a lazer straight edge using one...but i guess it doesnt have to be perfect perfect.
post #56 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by premiertrussman View Post

I was thinking a jig saw too....its just hard to get a lazer straight edge using one...but i guess it doesnt have to be perfect perfect.

Well, depending on how far away from doing it you might get to watch me wrestle with it first
post #57 of 84
Thread Starter 
Well - there certainly seems to be a talent difference in Lowe's ability to tint the primer. Same store, same primer two different people trying to match the color:



At first I didn't care that much but after painting I noticed the walls need a second coat while the ceiling doesn't. I probably would have said something if it weren't for the fact that I had a fair bit of the second gallon of paint left.

Unfortunately I underestimated how much the paint would show off imperfections in my mudding. Bumps that couldn't be seen earlier can now be seen when light shines off the walls. I am kinda bummed about how the walls turned out. Above the door and the soffit were particularly bad. My wife came down and didn't notice the bumps on the ceilings and the side and back walls aren't bad either. When I asked her how bad the soffit and above the door was she hesitated - which meant bad.

So I got out my drywall sander and tried to sand the bumps down. That was taking forever so I grabbed my drememl and sanding attachment. I sanded down the soffit and re-primed it. I think that it will look a lot better now once I get the paint on it

I am not too sure about the door frame. The soffit just had a very noticeable continuous edge where I (very poorly) tried to feather it out to cover up the corner bead. The area above the door was just randomly uneven so when I sanded it it has random parts that got sanded down and other parts that didn't. I am worried that applying paint to this area will replace the bumps with noticeable circles from where I sanded.

I guess worse case scenario is that I have to sand it a lot more to get it looking right so it's not a huge deal. It was just kind of a blow that with all the time I spent on the mudding and how good I thought it looked that it looked like it did when I was done. My wife says that if I fix the soffit and the door she doubts anyone else will really noticed

After priming the spots I sanded I decided that I would go ahead and setup the lights. I hoped that my wiring ability would be better than my mudding ability. Unfortunately my ability to install them seemed pretty bad as I tried about every way possible to screw up the installation of the first light (*Glances at instructions without reading* This should be easy! I know what I am doing! Oh wait - I did that wrong. Why is that like this? Oh - thats why. I did that wrong too)

Anyway - once I got that straightened out the rest of the installs went very quickly - it was actually a very easy project - after the first one.

I flicked the switch and Yay! The light work!



I started putting the wall covers on too. I did find out that the Monoprice wall covers don't cover as much wall space as regular outlet covers so I do have a bit more paint touchups to do there (as well as throws off my outlet symmetry since the plate sizes don't match. Oh well) which I will take care of when I re-paint the sanded spots and hit a couple of other areas that need a second coat

I started looking into carpet and Eesh it's expensive. At this point, having spent $50 more on primer and paint than I thought I would I am just under my budget (~150 under or so) so carpet will push me over - I am just trying to minimize the overage. The bad news is that finishes like trim and other incidentals might have to wait until I scrounge up some more money. At least I have all my equipment already. I looked at getting some aluminum for the rack covers and it looked to be about $70 for what I need. I have a lot of wood left over so I might see if I can make that work instead or just wait on covers as well

Well - not the rosiest update but still making progress!
post #58 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

Well - there certainly seems to be a talent difference in Lowe's ability to tint the primer. Same store, same primer two different people trying to match the color:

Well thats your problem. I wont buy paint at Lowes...their valspare stuff goes on horribly....a lot of people think they just arent good at painting...but to be honest...a lot of it is the paint.

Anyway, I really like that color! I wouldn't have chosen it on my own, but its soo...i dunno calming?

What do you have planned for carpet?
post #59 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by premiertrussman View Post

Well thats your problem. I wont buy paint at Lowes...their valspare stuff goes on horribly....a lot of people think they just arent good at painting...but to be honest...a lot of it is the paint.

Anyway, I really like that color! I wouldn't have chosen it on my own, but its soo...i dunno calming?

What do you have planned for carpet?

Interesting. I didn't think I had too much problem with it although, now that you mention it I think we did get a paint brand that we thought went on better.

Thanks about the color! We spent a while deciding (aka arguing "Can it be lighter?" "Lighter?! It's too light already!") and are pretty happy at the decision.

As for the carpet: Cheap, textured, cheap, a dark taupe color and cheap
post #60 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exterous View Post

Interesting. I didn't think I had too much problem with it although, now that you mention it I think we did get a paint brand that we thought went on better.

Thanks about the color! We spent a while deciding (aka arguing "Can it be lighter?" "Lighter?! It's too light already!") and are pretty happy at the decision.

As for the carpet: Cheap, textured, cheap, a dark taupe color and cheap

I understand about cheap. Everything I've done in my theater was, as you so eloquently put it, "on the cheap"! I'm looking forward to watching your progress.

Sorry if i missed it in your thread, but what kind of equipment are you planning on running?
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