or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › Official Vizio XVT3SV Series NO PRICE or Coupon talk
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Official Vizio XVT3SV Series NO PRICE or Coupon talk - Page 148

post #4411 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by chico_pr View Post
Hi guys, I'm considering the XVT3d474sv. I'd like to know the good and the bad of this tv.

I'm more concerned in 2d image quality and clouding/flashlighting.

I appreciate your honest opinion. Thanks!
I've had the set for a week. I think the 2D picture is top notch. I don't notice flashlighting until I get to a pretty extreme viewing angle. The biggest downside so far (and from reviewing this thread) seems to be with the firmware. I have experienced two random shutdowns. Now I've disconnected the network connection and cleared the memory in the hope that it solves the problem. If the TV is reliable, I think it's a real winner. But a great picture doesn't matter if the TV is unstable.
post #4412 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkrueger View Post

I've had the set for a week. I think the 2D picture is top notch. I don't notice flashlighting until I get to a pretty extreme viewing angle. The biggest downside so far (and from reviewing this thread) seems to be with the firmware. I have experienced two random shutdowns. Now I've disconnected the network connection and cleared the memory in the hope that it solves the problem. If the TV is reliable, I think it's a real winner. But a great picture doesn't matter if the TV is unstable.

Was it a true shut down (no blinking of the Vizio logo), or was it trying to reboot itself/firmware update. I've had my 553 since last October and only had the set reboot itself once and update its firmware once. Other than that, it's a solid performer that has been moved to the bedroom (had to get the 70" when my wife gave me the okay for Father's Day).
post #4413 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkrueger View Post

I've had the set for a week. I think the 2D picture is top notch. I don't notice flashlighting until I get to a pretty extreme viewing angle. The biggest downside so far (and from reviewing this thread) seems to be with the firmware. I have experienced two random shutdowns. Now I've disconnected the network connection and cleared the memory in the hope that it solves the problem. If the TV is reliable, I think it's a real winner. But a great picture doesn't matter if the TV is unstable.

Please define "flashlighting".
post #4414 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post

Please define "flashlighting".

Ah yes, I meant to say "blooming". I'm not a videophile, I just play one at home.
post #4415 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by grpape View Post

Was it a true shut down (no blinking of the Vizio logo), or was it trying to reboot itself/firmware update. I've had my 553 since last October and only had the set reboot itself once and update its firmware once. Other than that, it's a solid performer that has been moved to the bedroom (had to get the 70" when my wife gave me the okay for Father's Day).

Both of my shutdowns were true shotdowns. No flashing logo. The picture just froze and a few seconds later the set powered off as if someone hit the power button.
post #4416 of 4754
I learned a few things about these Vizios last night.

I had always suspected that since "Smart Dimming" modulates the backlight, that turning the backlight to zero would prevent SD from working. Apparently, not so; with the BL at zero, SD still works. So "zero" is probably not really fully off, and this is likely done to keep SD working with the BL turned low.

This has allowed me to upgrade my settings, moving BL from 15 to 7 (I had compromised by keeping it up at 15 to give SD some room to work with, which now proves unnecessary), and raising brightness and contrast 3 clicks each to compensate. I verified this using the grey scale from the HDNet TP, and the black and white points are still set just as good as before, if not even better. I also found that if you turn the auto-ambient light setting back on, they still track in light or dark, and track well enough to leave that setting on all of the time (although you must turn it off momentarily to actually change the BL setting).

Bottom line? Better pix than ever. And of course a lower BL is more energy-efficient as well.

It is pretty easy to verify SD working with the DirecTV screensaver on, as this is a blue logo floating "Pong-like" over a black background, and you can see the black area around the logo gets lighter than the rest of the background and this tracks as the logo moves. This is probably the most-difficult scenario for SD to appear transparently. It is even easier to see at a 45-degree look angle.

With normal video is is very nearly impossible to notice this particular artifact, however, which is as it should be. A dark wide shot with a full moon in it will just appear as if there were a little more natural haze around the moon or in the sky than normal while the darkest greys still seem naturally close to black, which is something acceptable because this appears normally in nature. What does not appear normally in nature is absolute black levels that are too grey or light, and that is of course what SD seems to prevent, effectively stretching the absolute black down where we want it dynamically. So, this makes SD very effective.

About the only other place I notice it is when a shot fades to black and back up; instead of a continuous smooth fade, there is a little jump at the point of threshold for SD, which is noticeable, yet not annoying. But this also makes full black really complete black, which I guess is the point.
post #4417 of 4754
Wow Tom, that was a very technical write up! Thanks! I'm still trying to understand it, tho, lol! Maybe I will if I get this set.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kkrueger View Post

Ah yes, I meant to say "blooming". I'm not a videophile, I just play one at home.

Flashlight is the effect of the corner leds making a "flashlight" kinda like a spotlight towards the center of the screen. Very annoying IMO.
post #4418 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by chico_pr View Post

Wow Tom, that was a very technical write up! Thanks! I'm still trying to understand it, tho, lol! Maybe I will if I get this set.




Flashlight is the effect of the corner leds making a "flashlight" kinda like a spotlight towards the center of the screen. Very annoying IMO.

I kind of thought that might be what that meant, as I was watching the DirecTV screensaver (see previous post). It is annoying to me that the black close to the area of light is not as black as the area away from the light, but it is still subtle, and what would be even more annoying is if there was no dimming at all. With normal video I don't even notice it.

My best guess is that this artifact is either more or less noticeable depending upon what technique (edge or full backlight) is used, and how many zones they use. I see it as quite effective on this set.

But before you buy, check out the Sony KDL-32BX420. My company just bought two of them and they looked terrific right out of the box (the Vizio needs a lot of tweaking to even get that close). For my money, the 2005-vintage Sony SXRD RP set has had the best color I have ever seen, and this Sony seems to be the closest thing to that I have ever seen. I have not had a chance to really check it out yet, but you should definitely do that if you are thinking of the Vizio. This Sony is a little cheaper and is not a LED set nor does it have the internet apps, but if you can live with that I think it might have a better picture. It appears to me to have the IPS display, just because there is no angular falloff. It does have local dimming and 24P operation, I just don't know if it does that by virtue of 120Hz or not, as that does not seem to be prominent.

For one thing, it obviously tracks the color better than the Vizios do. They are acceptable, but the Sony is really a stunner in the color accuracy department. When I look at my Vizio I think "yeah, that's pretty good; I can live with that" and I really don't feel like I am missing anything color-wise, but everytime I get a glance of these Sonys it really turns my head how great they look (I'd love to see them side-by-side).

But then what pushed me to Vizio in the first place was the pixel fill factor. I watch with the set so close it fills my entire visual space (less than arm's length for a 32"-er) and with most sets you can make out the pixels at such a close distance. The Vizio seems to be the hardest to distinguish individual pixels on when watching that close, even better than the Sony. But from 15 ft away, I think I have to give the edge to the Sony just for its gorgeous color rendition. Otherwise, they match pretty well.
post #4419 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post

I kind of thought that might be what that meant, as I was watching the DirecTV screensaver (see previous post). It is annoying to me that the black close to the area of light is not as black as the area away from the light, but it is still subtle, and what would be even more annoying is if there was no dimming at all. With normal video I don't even notice it.

My best guess is that this artifact is either more or less noticeable depending upon what technique (edge or full backlight) is used, and how many zones they use. I see it as quite effective on this set.

But before you buy, check out the Sony KDL-32BX420. My company just bought two of them and they looked terrific right out of the box (the Vizio needs a lot of tweaking to even get that close). For my money, the 2005-vintage Sony SXRD RP set has had the best color I have ever seen, and this Sony seems to be the closest thing to that I have ever seen. I have not had a chance to really check it out yet, but you should definitely do that if you are thinking of the Vizio. This Sony is a little cheaper and is not a LED set nor does it have the internet apps, but if you can live with that I think it might have a better picture. It appears to me to have the IPS display, just because there is no angular falloff. It does have local dimming and 24P operation, I just don't know if it does that by virtue of 120Hz or not, as that does not seem to be prominent.

For one thing, it obviously tracks the color better than the Vizios do. They are acceptable, but the Sony is really a stunner in the color accuracy department. When I look at my Vizio I think "yeah, that's pretty good; I can live with that" and I really don't feel like I am missing anything color-wise, but everytime I get a glance of these Sonys it really turns my head how great they look (I'd love to see them side-by-side).

But then what pushed me to Vizio in the first place was the pixel fill factor. I watch with the set so close it fills my entire visual space (less than arm's length for a 32"-er) and with most sets you can make out the pixels at such a close distance. The Vizio seems to be the hardest to distinguish individual pixels on when watching that close, even better than the Sony. But from 15 ft away, I think I have to give the edge to the Sony just for its gorgeous color rendition. Otherwise, they match pretty well.

I didn't think there were any non-LED LCD sets that have local dimming. I thought LED backlights are required for local dimming to be possible.
post #4420 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steph Stimson View Post

I am unable to change the Real Cinema Mode off...????


Make sure "Smooth Motion Effect" is not off, it needs to be set to either low, med, or high in order to adjust Real Cinema Mode. If you want it off, then I think it's turned off when "Smooth Motion Effect" is turned off (even though it may not show off in the menu, if you can't change it then it should be disabled).
post #4421 of 4754
Quick question about the set.

What should I set the audio lag on my AV Receiver to? Both going from PS3 to Receiver to TV and going from Cable TV back to the receiver. I know it's a little off but not sure how to set it properly without making it worse.
post #4422 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasmallen View Post

I didn't think there were any non-LED LCD sets that have local dimming. I thought LED backlights are required for local dimming to be possible.

That was my thought also, in mid June when I bought my Viz. As it turned out, there were two manufacturers that were using local dimming on CFL at that time, and I don't recall Sony being one of them. But stuff changes quickly, and a quick search on the internet revealed that this set has it. I was as surprised at that as you probably are.

It may be that with multiple CFL strips (as few as two) you can do some sort of rudimentary local dimming, but it may be just that (rudimentary) because you would likely have to have a light element for each zone. Viz claims up to 128 zones on a LED set, and that seems doable, but I don't see how you could really have many zones with CFL BL. And I think the number of zones might be basic to how effective local dimming can be. But that's just me speculating.

If I am right, though, that means manufacturers can do LD that is not really very effective, just so they can list it in the specs. I think you have to ask "how many zones" when you are comparison shopping the effectiveness of LD.
post #4423 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarspants View Post

Quick question about the set.

What should I set the audio lag on my AV Receiver to? Both going from PS3 to Receiver to TV and going from Cable TV back to the receiver. I know it's a little off but not sure how to set it properly without making it worse.

I was using 80 ms for my Sony and Insignia sets; I am using 100 ms for this set. That is with sound direct to AVR(not routed through the TV) and viewing DirecTV. YMMV.

Audio can be up to about 20 ms ahead of video or up to about 40 ms behind video without noticeable lipsync error. But even a bit more than that can make it annoying fairly quickly. Every set has at least 17 ms of delay (one frame) but some, and the Viz included, seem to have more than usual. Some sets delay the audio along with the video to compensate; my best guess is that Viz doesn't do that. Of course that only works if you route external components' audio through the TV first.
post #4424 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post

I was using 80 ms for my Sony and Insignia sets; I am using 100 ms for this set. That is with sound direct to AVR(not routed through the TV) and viewing DirecTV. YMMV.

Audio can be up to about 20 ms ahead of video or up to about 40 ms behind video without noticeable lipsync error. But even a bit more than that can make it annoying fairly quickly. Every set has at least 17 ms of delay (one frame) but some, and the Viz included, seem to have more than usual. Some sets delay the audio along with the video to compensate; my best guess is that Viz doesn't do that. Of course that only works if you route external components' audio through the TV first.

Thanks for the help. Too bad my receiver can't do different delays for each input. The TV delays the audio from the TV to the receiver so a delay on the receiver makes it way off. But watching a blu-ray the delay is perfect.
post #4425 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarspants View Post

Thanks for the help. Too bad my receiver can't do different delays for each input. The TV delays the audio from the TV to the receiver so a delay on the receiver makes it way off. But watching a blu-ray the delay is perfect.

This is why I would try to route all audio through the TV, in case it does delay the audio to match the video. That is also convenient because you can then switch components using the TV and the audio will follow, where as if you go AVR first, you may have to double select (audio then video), maybe not, if you use a single video/audio output from the AVR to the set, but I prefer TV first, AVR last. It also expands your available input count.

And actually, I mis-spoke, with the current setup I am routing all components audio and video through a switcher, then taking a single audio to the AVR and a single video to the TV from there (forgot I made a recent change when buying the Viz). This is also why I need 100 ms of delay (not using the audio out of the TV). I could use 10 or 20 more, actually, but it's close enough (my AVR only has 100). This is a setup that works for me since I don't use the tuner in the set at all (four sat IRD/DVRs and a DVDR).

If you have great discrepancies you can route the sources with short delays through the TV and those with long delays direct to AVR, which will somewhat equalize the delays among them, then use the AVR delay to move the delay en masse for all components. It doesn't have to be perfect; if you can get everything to fit inside that 60-65ms window the lipsync error will not be noticeable, even if they are up to 60 ms different in their individual delays. With luck, you will find an arrangement that stays under the annoyance threshold.
post #4426 of 4754
Hello, I'm new to this thread. I've been researching new tv's and these seem to have the best performance/dollar out there! Only thing is, I currently have a 50" Sony LCD RPTV and want to upgrade to at least 60". It looks like these top out at 55". Any word on bigger sizes coming out? I'm not in a hurry to upgrade. Thanks!
post #4427 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnc View Post

Hello, I'm new to this thread. I've been researching new tv's and these seem to have the best performance/dollar out there! Only thing is, I currently have a 50" Sony LCD RPTV and want to upgrade to at least 60". It looks like these top out at 55". Any word on bigger sizes coming out? I'm not in a hurry to upgrade. Thanks!

http://www.vizio.com/led-lcd-hdtvs/xvt3d650sv.html
post #4428 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post

This is why I would try to route all audio through the TV, in case it does delay the audio to match the video. That is also convenient because you can then switch components using the TV and the audio will follow, where as if you go AVR first, you may have to double select (audio then video), maybe not, if you use a single video/audio output from the AVR to the set, but I prefer TV first, AVR last. It also expands your available input count.

And actually, I mis-spoke, with the current setup I am routing all components audio and video through a switcher, then taking a single audio to the AVR and a single video to the TV from there (forgot I made a recent change when buying the Viz). This is also why I need 100 ms of delay (not using the audio out of the TV). I could use 10 or 20 more, actually, but it's close enough (my AVR only has 100). This is a setup that works for me since I don't use the tuner in the set at all (four sat IRD/DVRs and a DVDR).

If you have great discrepancies you can route the sources with short delays through the TV and those with long delays direct to AVR, which will somewhat equalize the delays among them, then use the AVR delay to move the delay en masse for all components. It doesn't have to be perfect; if you can get everything to fit inside that 60-65ms window the lipsync error will not be noticeable, even if they are up to 60 ms different in their individual delays. With luck, you will find an arrangement that stays under the annoyance threshold.

Never thought of routing everything through the TV first. I guess I would be a little concerned with losing audio quality. Plus, I like having all the inputs on my AVR labeled so I can see that I have the right input just by looking at the display. Switching inputs doesn't matter to me because I use a Logitech Harmony. Maybe I'll just have to find some middle ground.
post #4429 of 4754
Quote:

I've seen this model, but I prefer full array local dimming, not edge lit. Thanks anyway.
post #4430 of 4754
i lost my widgets. i never, ever use them, but i was messing around with the tv this morning and nothing's there.

i used to have pandora, "tune-in" radio, and a couple of other things. now they're not there and there's nothing in the "widget gallery." is it me?
post #4431 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsross View Post

Hi,

Would anyone here be able to supply me with the proper codeset to use for a Vizio XVT553SA TV's remote so it works properly with a Scientific Atlanta 8300HD DVR (Cablevision)? I've run through (seemingly) all available codesets within the "Cable Box" section (nothing in the "DVR" section seemed appropriate -- the closest one, codeset 110, did nothing). I've found some that allow the LIST button to bring up the list of recorded programs but disable the fast forward/rewind buttons and the A/B/C/D colored buttons, some that allow the fast forward/rewind and the A/B/C/D colored buttons to work but disable the LIST button, and some with variations thereof. However, I can't find one that allows the LIST button to bring up the list of recorded programs, the A/B/C/D buttons to work (so I can delete recordings after watching them), and the fast forward/rewind buttons to work.

Thanks.

Well, it seems I get to answer my own question!

Code 161 seems to work. Don't know why it didn't when I tried it a few months ago, but it does now.

David Ross
post #4432 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarspants View Post

Never thought of routing everything through the TV first. I guess I would be a little concerned with losing audio quality...

Just like component analog HD can have as good of PQ as digital HDMI can, analog audio can have as good of quality as digital audio can. Of course everything has to be working correctly, but its hard for much to go wrong with a couple of audio cables in a consumer environment. Plus, digital audio brings with it a host of other headaches we never had to deal with before.

But there are a couple of other things to consider:

1) analog doesn't support 5.1 DD in most instances
2) some TVs will input 5.1 just fine, but then not pass it on to the TV's output and then to the AVR.

If you need 5.1, then either of those could be a deal breaker.

I have not moved to 5.1 yet, even though all of my components and AVR support it, because I feel many of the glitches are not worked out; there are posts every day about problems with losing audio, audio artifacts, reclocking issues, etc. Plus I have heard 5.1 at a lot of different venues including other people's home theatre setups, and it never really has impressed me any more than good old 2.0 through Pro Logic IIx 7.1. Not only that, I don't think producers really mix well for 5.1 nor do they put much effort into it.

So if I am giving anything up there, what I am gaining in return is the ability to use a 31-band graphic equalizer and a automatic level controller. I get some of that in the GEQ in my AVR, but it is only 5 band, and the analog level controller seems to work better than the AC-3 compr and dynrng features in my AVR. Digital audio on the consumer level needs another 3-4 years of maturation before I will consider moving there.
post #4433 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post
1) analog doesn't support 5.1 DD in most instances
2) some TVs will input 5.1 just fine, but then not pass it on to the TV's output and then to the AVR.[/indent]
If you need 5.1, then either of those could be a deal breaker.

I have not moved to 5.1 yet, even though all of my components and AVR support it, because I feel many of the glitches are not worked out; there are posts every day about problems with losing audio, audio artifacts, reclocking issues, etc. Plus I have heard 5.1 at a lot of different venues including other people's home theatre setups, and it never really has impressed me any more than good old 2.0 through Pro Logic IIx 7.1. Not only that, I don't think producers really mix well for 5.1 nor do they put much effort into it.

So if I am giving anything up there, what I am gaining in return is the ability to use a 31-band graphic equalizer and a automatic level controller. I get some of that in the GEQ in my AVR, but it is only 5 band, and the analog level controller seems to work better than the AC-3 compr and dynrng features in my AVR. Digital audio on the consumer level needs another 3-4 years of maturation before I will consider moving there.
DD 5.1 only works with digital input, not analog.

As for the problems you read about, those are far and few between. Dolby Digital has been stable for almost 10 years. Most of what you are reading about has to do with the newer codecs such as DD+ and DTS-HD....again, not really a lot of problems.

Producers don't do the mixing, it is done by sound engineers, and it is pretty much a standard now as well. I suspect you are not impressed by what you have heard due to poorly set up systems.

As for eq systems, I guess it really depends on what you are trying to achieve, but would take the modern automatic room correction systems in most AVRs now over a graphic equalizer.

Set yourself up for plain old DD 5.1, do it right, and you won't experience any of those problems you listed.
post #4434 of 4754
At CES, Vizio announced they would support Skype on their sets - but they seem to have gone radio silent on this since then. Anyone with any info on whether this is still coming?
post #4435 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdeluca View Post

At CES, Vizio announced they would support Skype on their sets - but they seem to have gone radio silent on this since then. Anyone with any info on whether this is still coming?

That would be so cool!
post #4436 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by cschang View Post
...Producers don't do the mixing, it is done by sound engineers, and it is pretty much a standard now as well. I suspect you are not impressed by what you have heard due to poorly set up systems.

As for eq systems, I guess it really depends on what you are trying to achieve, but would take the modern automatic room correction systems in most AVRs now over a graphic equalizer...
Auto correction seems sorely lacking to me, and they don't normally equalize, they set levels and delay times. If they did I doubt they could do it as well as professionally trained ears anyway. I am not trying to equalize for the room, the room should impart whatever natural character the room has, just as it imparts its natural character to a live conversation inside that room. I am equalizing for the speakers, which always need it no matter how much you may have spent for them. Accepting what off-the shelf speakers give you straight out of the box is like buying off the rack at the Men's Wearhouse, while good EQ is like having $12,000 suits professionally tailored.

And thanks for the clarification, Captain Obvious, of course Producers don't directly mix audio, just like they don't directly edit on the Avid NLE or physically splice the film; its surprising that anyone might take that statement so literally. Having been both a desktop recording Engineer and hobbyist for a decade and an audio and broadcast Engineer for all of my professional life, I think somehow it would be difficult for me not to know that. But the point is the Producer has the first and last word on how much of the resources are deployed to record 5.1, and how much energy goes into mixing for 5.1, and I don't think they put much of anything into it, probably because they don't understand it. The audio Engineer is but a hired gun working at the whim of the Producer, so it is typically the Producer driving what happens with 5.1.
post #4437 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCat View Post

Auto correction seems sorely lacking to me, and they don't normally equalize, they set levels and delay times. If they did I doubt they could do it as well as professionally trained ears anyway. I am not trying to equalize for the room, the room should impart whatever natural character the room has, just as it imparts its natural character to a live conversation inside that room. I am equalizing for the speakers, which always need it no matter how much you may have spent for them. Accepting what off-the shelf speakers give you straight out of the box is like buying off the rack at the Men's Wearhouse, while good EQ is like having $12,000 suits professionally tailored.

And thanks for the clarification, Captain Obvious, of course Producers don't directly mix audio, just like they don't directly edit on the Avid NLE or physically splice the film; its surprising that anyone might take that statement so literally. Having been both a desktop recording Engineer and hobbyist for a decade and an audio and broadcast Engineer for all of my professional life, I think somehow it would be difficult for me not to know that. But the point is the Producer has the first and last word on how much of the resources are deployed to record 5.1, and how much energy goes into mixing for 5.1, and I don't think they put much of anything into it, probably because they don't understand it. The audio Engineer is but a hired gun working at the whim of the Producer, so it is typically the Producer driving what happens with 5.1.


Audyssey Multeq

Sounds like you're talking about the auto setup features that most home theater receivers used 7+ years ago. Now, software (like audyssey in the link above) is common on even entry level AVRs. My previous HT recv. (Onkyo) cost about $250 and it included 2eq which uses three measurements (MultEQ) from the listening area. My current unit (Denon) which cost about $850, uses six measurements and also applies filters to the sub. Setting the crossover, speaker sizes, speaker distance, delay, etc. is a (very, very) small part of the auto setup. In my AVR's audyssey setup each speaker (7) is adjusted individually by the software using a 9 band eq ranging from 63hz to 16khz.

How it adjusts the freq response

Even the AVRs that don't use the Audyssey brand have their own config. software that adjusts the sound eq. I think it's very rare now to have a AVR auto setup program that only sets the levels and delay. It's for sure not the norm in 2011, maybe in 2002, but not now.

Far more in depth than setting levels and delays...
post #4438 of 4754
Vizio XVT3SV - I guess we're not getting anymore firmware update huh? It just feels like Vizio had moved on to something else. Dec2010 was the last time Vizio did an auto-firmware update. September2011 is here and still no word on another firmware update, specifically on the USB video media capabilities. I'd even take an improved Netf**x interface update...anything, Vizio??
post #4439 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by awaters2879 View Post

thanks DSulls. where did you guys see that they might add support for video formats 'via' USB?

Cnet reviews for XVT3SV mentioned that the TV is capable of USB video media playback through firmware updates - unfortunately, when Vizio released an update back in Dec2010 they only enable images/audio file support. Vizio tech support mentioned that they are still working for an update but that was back in Feb2011 - it's almost September no still no firmware update. Vizio most likely have moved on to something else, so I'm no longer expecting that promise to materialize...
My solution? I bought an HDMI HD media player on Amaz*n for $65 - now I can watch all my HD contents from a flashdrive, SDHC card, internal or external hard drive with no problem. Plus my $98 LG bluray player support the most common media files including AVCHD.
post #4440 of 4754
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdeluca View Post

At CES, Vizio announced they would support Skype on their sets - but they seem to have gone radio silent on this since then. Anyone with any info on whether this is still coming?

Vizio announce lots of things, believe it when you see it...they announced USB video media support for this series as well back in October 2010. The Dec2010 firmware release they made the USB functional but no video support as announced...so about the Skype support, I won't hold my breath on that. many are still waiting for the USB video support, and even more for another firmware update - so far nothing from Vizio...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: LCD Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › Official Vizio XVT3SV Series NO PRICE or Coupon talk