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GTX 260 "Tropics" benchmarks

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I bought this card because I hate having a video card that plays 1080p content flawlessly but chokes on OpenGL stuff like visualizations and screensavers. Also, since I have to boot Windows to watch Netflix, I wanted something that was hw-accelerated in Flash and could handle some DX10 gaming.

This thing is a monstrous beast that takes up 2 slots, requires 2 6-pin PCIe power connections, and blocks a drive bay in my mid-tower case. It has 2 fans on it but still runs pretty hot under a load -- it has already overheated and shut down my system once during an intense scene in Bioshock 2. I'll relocate it to a larger, better ventilated case when I find one that I like.

Following are the results of the Unigine Tropics Benchmark using the same resolution and rendering settings in 3 different environments. Note that the CPU frequency reads differently because of scaling.


Linux - OpenGL




XPSP3 - DX9




WIN7 - DX10

post #2 of 5
The GTX280 or GTX285 are better if you want to play games in Linux. The GTX260 is not a good buy to be used in Linux. I suggest a GTS250 because it has more video RAM and has more grunt which OpenGL requires.

Your benchmarks are incomplete because you did not use OpenGL in Windows.

You should check the cpufreq governor to make sure it is set at performance.
post #3 of 5
I don't see why a 460 would not be a good card for linux. There is quite a bit of power behind it.

Yeah, I'm wondering if the CPU governor is causing some of the reduced framerates. Here are my results:

post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by electroju View Post

The GTX280 or GTX285 are better if you want to play games in Linux. The GTX260 is not a good buy to be used in Linux. I suggest a GTS250 because it has more video RAM and has more grunt which OpenGL requires.

Your benchmarks are incomplete because you did not use OpenGL in Windows.

You should check the cpufreq governor to make sure it is set at performance.

Like I said, I'll be gaming in Windows, and I didn't test OpenGL in Windows because all of my games will be using DirectX. For apples<->apples, though, here are the results with OpenGl In Win7:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Dog View Post

I don't see why a 460 would not be a good card for linux. There is quite a bit of power behind it.

Yeah, I'm wondering if the CPU governor is causing some of the reduced framerates. Here are my results: ...

I don't think so because it will scale up on demand.

Also, you had Occlusion disabled in your test (which is the default in the Linux version). That gives a higher FPS reading, e.g. here's mine sans-occlusion:



The bottom line for me is -- as long as I average 30 FPS in these kinds of benchmarks then I'm happy.

EDIT: I was back with Ubuntu's nvidia driver version on that last test -- trying to determine if there is a difference between it and the latest from nvidia. I don't want to install manually without good reason.
post #5 of 5
Here is mine with Occlusions on. Pretty big fps hit but sure does make it look nice!!!

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