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Blu Ray Rip Size

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
When you guys rip blu-rays to your computer do you shrink them or leave them untouched? I am looking to buy a nas and rip all my discs but am confused on how many TB's I am going to need.
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylnad123 View Post

When you guys rip blu-rays to your computer do you shrink them or leave them untouched? I am looking to buy a nas and rip all my discs but am confused on how many TB's I am going to need.

The average BD rip is about 28-32 GB. This includes Main Movie, HiDef Audio and subs. This will give PQ and AQ identical to the source. You can do the math on your own based on the number of movies you have. I would recommend a Raid 5 Array with global hot spare in the event of drive failure.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylnad123 View Post

When you guys rip blu-rays to your computer do you shrink them or leave them untouched? I am looking to buy a nas and rip all my discs but am confused on how many TB's I am going to need.

Also figure out if you want to keep the full disc or just the main movie. Keeping the main movie only should drop the filesize anywhere from 15-40% (no encoding being done so you still retain the original picture/audio)
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackssr View Post

The average BD rip is about 28-32 GB. This includes Main Movie, HiDef Audio and subs. This will give PQ and AQ identical to the source. You can do the math on your own based on the number of movies you have. I would recommend a Raid 5 Array with global hot spare in the event of drive failure.

And I would recommend Raid 6, as the space requirements of this type of array start to work against Raid 5 if and when you have a drive failure. There is a thread around here somewhere about it but basically the statistical failure rate of a hard drive measured in read/write access (in Raid 5) will be exceeded when performing a rebuild upon a single drive failure. This means that there is a high probability of a second drive failure during the rebuild process, resulting in total data loss. That being said I currently have a 5TB array on Raid 5, which scares me to death. I will be migrating this over to a larger raid 6 array when time and resources permit. Good luck with your build.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbinatl View Post

And I would recommend Raid 6, as the space requirements of this type of array start to work against Raid 5 if and when you have a drive failure. There is a thread around here somewhere about it but basically the statistical failure rate of a hard drive measured in read/write access (in Raid 5) will be exceeded when performing a rebuild upon a single drive failure. This means that there is a high probability of a second drive failure during the rebuild process, resulting in total data loss. That being said I currently have a 5TB array on Raid 5, which scares me to death. I will be migrating this over to a larger raid 6 array when time and resources permit. Good luck with your build.


I've never had an issue with a RAID 5 in the few years I've been using them. (and even with RAID 0 which I've been using since the late 90's)and certatainly the odds of having two drives fail at the same time are very remote.

I just figure if I haven't had a RAID 0 fail(which only takes one drive failure) in the 11 to 12 years I've been using them, the odds of two drives failing with my RAID 5 setups are even more remote.

Although I do back up my current RAID 0 setups regularly. But I don't make any backups of my RAID 5 setups. The RAID 5 setups are to large for me to back up any way. But my RAID 0 setups are two and three drive configs, with low capacity drives. So the RAID 0 sizes are under 1TB which are easy to backup since they are so small.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbinatl View Post

And I would recommend Raid 6, as the space requirements of this type of array start to work against Raid 5 if and when you have a drive failure. There is a thread around here somewhere about it but basically the statistical failure rate of a hard drive measured in read/write access (in Raid 5) will be exceeded when performing a rebuild upon a single drive failure. This means that there is a high probability of a second drive failure during the rebuild process, resulting in total data loss. That being said I currently have a 5TB array on Raid 5, which scares me to death. I will be migrating this over to a larger raid 6 array when time and resources permit. Good luck with your build.

I agree, but Raid 6 cards are expensive and I do not know of one with Esata port multipler. Do you? If so, please enlighten me as I will forward on to my clients. I have used Raid 5 for years and never had 2 drives fail at the same time. Anything could happen I guess.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbinatl View Post

And I would recommend Raid 6, as the space requirements of this type of array start to work against Raid 5 if and when you have a drive failure. There is a thread around here somewhere about it but basically the statistical failure rate of a hard drive measured in read/write access (in Raid 5) will be exceeded when performing a rebuild upon a single drive failure. This means that there is a high probability of a second drive failure during the rebuild process, resulting in total data loss. That being said I currently have a 5TB array on Raid 5, which scares me to death. I will be migrating this over to a larger raid 6 array when time and resources permit. Good luck with your build.

I have 32Tb in Raid 5. I do have 2 global hot spares in place.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackssr View Post

I have 32Tb in Raid 5. I do have 2 global hot spares in place.

What are you using for that? I'm thinking about taking most of my drives from my WHS(which really only gives me 21TB of storage with Duplication from the 42TB of drives I have in it)and putting them in a RAID setup to maximize the storage capacity of those drives.

I just wish I could have used a RAID 5 setup 7 or 8 years ago when I had a dozen 250GB drives setup for my HD recordings. I was accessing each drive separately, which worked but it was more of a PITA.(and I didn't want to use a RAID 0 setup for fear at the time of losing all my HD recordings),
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

What are you using for that? I'm thinking about taking most of my drives from my WHS(which really only gives me 21TB of storage with Duplication from the 42TB of drives I have in it)and putting them in a RAID setup to maximize the storage capacity of those drives.

I just wish I could have used a RAID 5 setup 7 or 8 years ago when I had a dozen 250GB drives setup for my HD recordings. I was accessing each drive separately, which worked but it was more of a PITA.(and I didn't want to use a RAID 0 setup for fear at the time of losing all my HD recordings),

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-036-_-Product x 1 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-051-_-Product x 2 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822145298 x 16 pcs

I recommended this setup several times to you in the past. It has proven to work for myself and over 12 of my clients. I have mine running almost 8 months without issue. I do use WHS 32 bit, not the beta 64 bit
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackssr View Post

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-036-_-Product x 1 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-051-_-Product x 2 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822145298 x 16 pcs

I recommended this setup several times to you in the past. It has proven to work for myself and over 12 of my clients. I have mine running almost 8 months without issue. I do use WHS 32 bit, not the beta 64 bit

There you go again, Rippin and a Tearin
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 View Post

There you go again, Rippin and a Tearin

Oh you're "Rippin and Tearin"... Not without me your not!

More and more people are getting into the act.. I would pay to see Aaron Rip and Tear !

http://www.comedycentral.com/videos/...pin-and-tearin... Just wrong!
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
So I got this buffalo link station quad 6tb for real cheap from a friend

http://www.buffalotech.com/products/...-quad-ls-qlr5/.

Since I can't run a raid 6 with this setup would you recommend raid 10 or just stick with 5?
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackssr View Post

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-036-_-Product x 1 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-051-_-Product x 2 pc

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822145298 x 16 pcs

I recommended this setup several times to you in the past. It has proven to work for myself and over 12 of my clients. I have mine running almost 8 months without issue. I do use WHS 32 bit, not the beta 64 bit

I do remember looking at those same products before. But I didn't realize they were from you. Thanks.

I think i might be going the UnRAID route. Not sure though. Although I should have everything I need lying around except for the drive enclosures. I think I might try to reuse the tower case I used in the early 2000's for my HD recordings. That had space for twelve drives. Not sure though since I flip flop every week on it.
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