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How to connect antenna and dvd player to tv via component video?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi, I need to connect an indoor HDTV antenna (coax cable) and a blu-ray player (component video/audio output) to a Panasonic tv (TC-P42X1). My place came with concealed component video/audio wiring and there is no place to run an additional cable for the antenna. Is there a device I can use that will take the antenna and dvd player as inputs and output component video/audio? Could you also recommend a brand and/or model?

Thanks,
Steve
post #2 of 12
If you can't run coax to the TV, you can't use the TV's built-in tuner. You'll have to get a separate STB to use as a tuner, and then use a component-video switcher to allow the STB and the Blu-ray player to share the single input to the TV.

For STBs, see the "Official AVS HDTV STB Synopsis" which is a sticky post at the top of this forum. For a component-video switcher, you might try Monoprice. There are probably some others out there, but I haven't shopped for one in a long time.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
thank you!
post #4 of 12
Can you discreetly place the indoor antenna near or behind the TV?
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
The tv is going to be mounted above a fireplace. The walls are recessed on either side of the fireplace. The antenna input is on the left side of the tv (when facing the tv) and the concealed wiring exits the wall on the right side. I suppose if the antenna came with a long enough cable I could put it on a rack along with the dvd player and run the cable behind the tv though it would be exposed as it goes around the fireplace and down to the rack. I'd prefer to avoid that. I am even planning to replace the rabbit ears I have with a flat antenna for aesthetics (I don't know if that's a good idea functionally)
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebread View Post

I am even planning to replace the rabbit ears I have with a flat antenna for aesthetics (I don't know if that's a good idea functionally)

In general, "pretty" antennas aren't as effective as the old-school "ugly" bare metal-wire ones, especially for VHF, but if your signals are strong enough, the "pretty" ones may nevertheless be good enough. The only way to know for sure is to try it.

If you're in a very-strong-signal area, beware of antennas that have built-in amplifiers. Very strong signals overload them, which distorts the output signal (deadly for digital reception).
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebread View Post

... I am even planning to replace the rabbit ears I have with a flat antenna for aesthetics (I don't know if that's a good idea functionally)

No, it's not a good idea, functionally.

Also, putting the indoor antenna as far away as possible from electrically interfering devices (like a computer, TV, router, etc.) is usually better than having it right by the TV. Interference + a functionally poor antenna can make indoor digital reception very frustrating.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebread View Post

The tv is going to be mounted above a fireplace. The walls are recessed on either side of the fireplace. The antenna input is on the left side of the tv (when facing the tv) and the concealed wiring exits the wall on the right side. I suppose if the antenna came with a long enough cable I could put it on a rack along with the dvd player and run the cable behind the tv though it would be exposed as it goes around the fireplace and down to the rack. I'd prefer to avoid that. I am even planning to replace the rabbit ears I have with a flat antenna for aesthetics (I don't know if that's a good idea functionally)

Aside from the antenna issue, mounting an HDTV above a fireplace isn't a good idea, if the fireplace is functional and used. The heat rising to the HDTV may cause overheating and/or shorten it's life.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Aside from the antenna issue, mounting an HDTV above a fireplace isn't a good idea, if the fireplace is functional and used. The heat rising to the HDTV may cause overheating and/or shorten it's life.

Depending on the Height of the fireplace, it may also cause neck strain if you have to tilt your head back to view it.

The recommendation is for your eye-line to fall about 1/3rd of the distance from the bottom to the top of the set. Your Owner's Manual will have suggestions. If you depart too much from the guidelines, the brightness, color, and contrast will suffer.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Aside from the antenna issue, mounting an HDTV above a fireplace isn't a good idea, if the fireplace is functional and used. The heat rising to the HDTV may cause overheating and/or shorten it's life.

I've never understood the fascination with mounting a TV that high. Most I've seen in this location are too high even when standing.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Sorry for the late reply. This is a new place I moved into and unfortunately I have no option other than to mount it above the fireplace in the living area because that is the only place available -- its a small living area. I really wish there wasn't a fireplace because I have no intention of ever using it and it makes the tv too high for an area that is only 10 feet wide. I'm hoping that having the tv tilt a little and a sofa with a high back and cushions will make it ok. I work with computers so I know how important it is to have the screen at the right level.

Back to the antenna -- There are also 2 CAT-5 cables provided in the concealed wiring behind the tv. I don't know what they are for and I think maybe I can replace at least one of them with a coax. Then I wouldn't need the equipment. I was told that the component video cables are stapled inside the wall and I hope its not the same for the CAT-5 cables. Your comments got me thinking that I should consider putting some kind of shelf on the anntenna input side of the tv and I'll look into that if I can't replace the CAT-5, before I invest in the STB.

At my old place I was on the 1st floor and surrounded by trees and buildings and could never get VHF and I tried a flat antenna to see if that would work but it sounds like that was the wrong approach. New place is on the 3rd floor and no obstructions and so I'll try out the flat one to see if I have any luck.
post #12 of 12
Some newer TV's have Ethernet inputs for Internet functionality. It's still kind of bizarre they ran component and Cat5 but no coax.
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