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The Official Marantz SR7005 Receiver Page!! - Page 75

post #2221 of 2387

Here's a press release from Datasat [DTS in theater use] which makes no mention that the commercial theatrical presentation of Expendables 2 was any different than any of their other movies, in the actual cinemas, should anyone care:

 

http://www.datasatdigital.com/lib/downloads/August-2012-US-Release-List.pdf

 

I still see this bluray release as more of a marketing ploy, promoting DTS Neo:X, than something the sound engineers who made the movie purposefully added as dedicated, purposeful channels of added sound, for the tiny audience of home users, only, who will even get to hear it. But who knows?


Edited by m. zillch - 9/2/13 at 11:36am
post #2222 of 2387
I am setting up my first HT. Running Paradigm Monitor 9's with matching center and sub. I was looking a good AVR to go with for $800 or less. I happened upon a deal at the local BB on a new Marantz SR 7005 for $699. I know this unit was built in late 2010. I have a couple of weeks to return it, if need be. I am concerned about buying what is essentially 4yr old technology. The unit comes with a full warranty. I was looking at the Onkyo NR818, the Pioneer SC-61 and the Denon 3113ci. All see to be reviewed pretty well. Any thoughts on what would be the best course of action? I listen to music about 30% of the time, but also want something that makes TV (Panasonic VT50 plasma) and movies enjoyable. Should I keep this AVR or buy something more current?
post #2223 of 2387
The SR7005 is a powerful (91.2W/ch x 5 into 8 ohms @ 0.1% distortion), well-equipped (incl. Audyssey MultEQ XT and Dynamic EQ) and well-rated, upper-tier Marantz AVR. If you don't need the features available in newer AVRs, $699 w/ full warranty seems like a pretty good deal to me.
Edited by eljaycanuck - 9/6/13 at 11:25am
post #2224 of 2387
Is there a reason why its not possible to apply dynamic range compression to DTS audio sources such as on blue ray discs? I'm using the receiver to do all the decoding of source material and from what I can tell...the receiver doesn't allow the option like possible with DD source material. I'm interested in this for late night viewing, etc.
post #2225 of 2387
^^
As noted in your Owner's manual, that setting only applies to Dolby True HD source audio while the more current Audyssey Dynamic Volume applies to both DD and DTS audio.
post #2226 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

^^
As noted in your Owner's manual, that setting only applies to Dolby True HD source audio while the more current Audyssey Dynamic Volume applies to both DD and DTS audio.
I can't stand the dynamic volume function so i guess I'm out of an option unless its a DD audio source in terms of managing the compression thru the audio menu. I was really wondering why you can't manage the compression on the Dolby true HD sources as well?
post #2227 of 2387
Dynamic Volume has three different level settings. Suggest trying each one.
post #2228 of 2387
Harmony Touch with Marantz sr7005
Hello, how compatible is the touch with the marantz sr7005? I probably use the marantz remote most for changing from A/D, different inputs, different zones etc. will the programing be straight forward (I.E. just putting in the model number via software into the touch) or will there need to be a fair amount of customization? Thx.
post #2229 of 2387
jdsmoothie, m. zillch
My Kef Q900 can handle 200 watt and sr7005 has 125 per channel, that's under power, I figure if I bi-amp it I'll get 250 watts for each of my front speaker, wouldn't that be better? I'm running a 5.2 channel surround, that mean I have 2 extra to put to good use
post #2230 of 2387
duyhung,

The maximum wattage is used only when you turn up the volume to almost ear-damaging levels. At normal listening levels only about 10 Watts or so are used, unless you have inefficient speakers in a large room. KEF speakers are reasonably efficient (91dB @2.83V/m).
post #2231 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelly View Post

Harmony Touch with Marantz sr7005
Hello, how compatible is the touch with the marantz sr7005? I probably use the marantz remote most for changing from A/D, different inputs, different zones etc. will the programing be straight forward (I.E. just putting in the model number via software into the touch) or will there need to be a fair amount of customization? Thx.

AFAIK, with any of the Harmony models it's simply a matter of downloading the model's remote codes to the Harmony remote. In some instance you may want some additional custom codes which can sometimes be copied from another AVR model's remote codes.
post #2232 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by duyhung View Post

jdsmoothie, m. zillch
My Kef Q900 can handle 200 watt and sr7005 has 125 per channel, that's under power, I figure if I bi-amp it I'll get 250 watts for each of my front speaker, wouldn't that be better? I'm running a 5.2 channel surround, that mean I have 2 extra to put to good use

As Seldon notes, on average, your speakers are only drawing a few watts of power, let alone anywhere near the maximum the AVR can provide. Using the "bi-amp" feature on the AVR "might" result in at best 10% more power but certainly not 250W of power. If you feel you want more power than what the AVR can provide you would need to add an external amp that is capable of providing 200W+ (eg. Emotiva XPA-2 or XPA-3).
post #2233 of 2387

"Active" bi-amping has some benefits, true, but is more complex than most consumers are willing put up with and requires an additional device, an active crossover, as well as the means to set its controls [frequency, slope, and level, X2] properly. ["Bass management", which almost all of us using a powered subwoofer utilize, are reaping the benefits of this form of bi-amping, BTW.]

 

Passive biamping, however, meaning both the "HF driving" amp and the "LF driving" amp receive the same, full-range signal [what's being discussed here] is 100% useless for consumers. I've even heard it argued that if all four of the amps reside in the same product, then one is taxing that unit's single power supply doubly by attempting this sonically worthless move, which wont play perceivably better or louder, compared to just using two of the amps on that one power supply, so bi-amping might therefore even be detrimental!

 

KEF and many other speaker companies (if not the majority) help perpetuate the myths of both bi-wiring and  passive bi-amping because they are "bending to market pressure". They should be ashamed of themselves and are liars if their literature makes any claims as to "improved separation between the highs and lows", etc. It is pure bunk.

 

[In some instances a designer of an amplified loudspeaker may choose to use an internal, bi-amped design, but unlike a typical consumer, s/he has full control of all aspects of the crossover and can optimize if for this specific application, not having to worry that it also at times will have jumper straps left in place and be driven by a single, external amp.]


Edited by m. zillch - 9/15/13 at 4:53pm
post #2234 of 2387
Need some help. I was listening to Pandora via the receiver under "internet" mode and my son accidentally hit the "v.sel" button on the remote. This has resulted in no picture and I can't get it back to where I can the receiver menu on the TV. Thus, I can't try and fix the input selections. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
post #2235 of 2387
^
You will need to access the menu using the buttons hidden beneath the front panel door. You can then navigate to reset your video selection for that input using the AVR's display panel.
post #2236 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by erhurd View Post

^
You will need to access the menu using the buttons hidden beneath the front panel door. You can then navigate to reset your video selection for that input using the AVR's display panel.
thanks. That's what I did and figured out how to get to the display to come on the screen. I then figured out that the video select function needed to be out back to "source" and then the internet radio menu popped back on the screen. One last thing, I can't for the life of me figure out how to get to the input assign screen. Any idea how to get to it? I feel like I've been thru the menu options 50 times now.
post #2237 of 2387
^^
P. 65 in the SR7005 Owner's manual shows a map of the possible menu selections. smile.gif
post #2238 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

^^
P. 65 in the SR7005 Owner's manual shows a map of the possible menu selections. smile.gif
Thanks. Pretty sure i looked at the diagram you're referencing but ill look a it again tonight. By the way, I've been messing around with the dynamic volume feature some and it seems to be really hit or miss depending on the material. Watched a movie the other day with it on, and i liked it fine. One thing I do like is that it seems to enhance the sound of the dialogue. Other times when watching a tv program...it seems to make the bass much too boomy so you have to adjust the subwoofer down a good bit. Guess you just have to adjust it according to watch you're watching.
post #2239 of 2387
Pretty much, yes. Dynamic volume will attempt to normalize the volume ... increasing the low dialogue and compressing the loud explosions and obnoxious TV commercials. Dyn EQ will increase the bass at volume levels below 80/0db so you can reduce this effect by using the Reference Level Offset set to 10db.
post #2240 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

Pretty much, yes. Dynamic volume will attempt to normalize the volume ... increasing the low dialogue and compressing the loud explosions and obnoxious TV commercials. Dyn EQ will increase the bass at volume levels below 80/0db so you can reduce this effect by using the Reference Level Offset set to 10db.
Thanks. I will try adjusting the offset and see how that works. Does the receiver store the offset setting for each source input independently or does it keep it at the same setting for all sources? Thus, have a different offset for listening to music, watching tv, and/or movie. I know there are different offset settings available for music, movies, etc. however I can't remember if it'll store a different setting for SAT, BD, etc.
post #2241 of 2387
Hi Guys

I have a 7005 AVR, and Klipsch Reference 82 ii speakers. Now I want to upgrade my two front speakers and get the big
boys (Ref 7 ii). I would like to do this to have bigger/better speakers for 2 channel listening to music.

Now instead of getting rid of the Ref 82 ii fronts, I would like to use them as my FRNT WIDE speakers.

The 7005 offer 125W per channel, and the Ref 82 ii are rated 125W RMS. The Ref 7 ii however are rated at 250W RMS.

My questions is will I need additional power amp for the Ref 7 ii's?
Or what would you guys recommend I do to get the most out of my Ref 7 ii's?

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I'm not even sure how the 2 CH power amp would interface with the 7005...when it comes to using surround sound how will the amp know that the two front speakers are power from another amp?

Maybe I will need to buy a new amp? Please let me know

And if somebody is using frontwide speakers, could you please let me know if there's a big difference and worth doing this?

Sprog
post #2242 of 2387
sprogk,

Using those speakers as wides will work fine with your receiver. You don't need an external amp.

Speaker wattage ratings are upper limits. If you actually drive them continuously with more than that much power, you're likely to damage them and your hearing: they'll be extremely loud. Those limits usually are relevant if you're using the speakers in a very large, "dead" room. Similarly, a receiver's per-channel wattage rating also is a maximum, usually relevant when no more than two channels are driven (i.e. producing that much sound) simultaneously. If all of the channels are producing the maximum volume that the receiver can deliver at the same time, the most power that the receiver can produce is quite a bit less than the maximum possible when only one or two channels are at max.

Normal volume levels usually use less than 10 or 20 Watts. Klipsch speakers are very efficient, so they need even less than that to produce room-filling sound.
post #2243 of 2387

Marantz gear isn't known for having the lowest background noise (the residual hiss heard during musical silence) out there. Keep in mind the professional test reports (magazines like Home Theater, for example) which document the actual levels, do so with all processing turned off. Turn "on" Audyssey XT [generally a good thing, IMO] and the hiss levels are even higher.

 

I don't have much of a problem with this in my setup, but there are five categories, that come to mind, where this can be a potential problem:

 

A. People with very quiet rooms [No background noises such as AC, fans, hard drives [e.g. DVR], furnace, wind, traffic, etc., all of which mask our perception of low level hiss].

B. People who sit closer to their speakers than average, either due to having small rooms or personal preference.

C. People using outboard amps with a high gain factor [a common example being some of the Emotiva amps with +32 dB]

D. People using very efficient speakers [Klipsch being a perfect example]

E. People who are very sensitive to what the residual hiss level is, perhaps because they just read this post! ;)

 

People who fit only one of the above categories will probably squeak by without any problems, but people who fit two or more categories are asking for trouble, if you ask me.

 

The Klipsch RF-82 II play at 98 dB for 1 watt, the RF-7 II play the same input, including the hiss, 3 dB even louder, and this potentially could be a concern if the hiss is right at the threshold of being an audible problem.


Edited by m. zillch - 10/8/13 at 7:36pm
post #2244 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

sprogk,

Using those speakers as wides will work fine with your receiver. You don't need an external amp.

Speaker wattage ratings are upper limits. If you actually drive them continuously with more than that much power, you're likely to damage them and your hearing: they'll be extremely loud. Those limits usually are relevant if you're using the speakers in a very large, "dead" room. Similarly, a receiver's per-channel wattage rating also is a maximum, usually relevant when no more than two channels are driven (i.e. producing that much sound) simultaneously. If all of the channels are producing the maximum volume that the receiver can deliver at the same time, the most power that the receiver can produce is quite a bit less than the maximum possible when only one or two channels are at max.

Normal volume levels usually use less than 10 or 20 Watts. Klipsch speakers are very efficient, so they need even less than that to produce room-filling sound.


Thanks Selden Ball

So I'm good to go with the amp I have. Will I get to use the Ref 7 ii to their full potential with that AVR?
The other questions was, does the front wides makes a big difference while watching moves?

Thanks
Sprog
post #2245 of 2387

Would you like your home theater to reflect the way movie sound is reproduced in actual commercial cinemas? Then don't use "front wides" because not a single movie theater in the US uses "front wides". They are artificial channels, not encoded in the movie soundtrack, neither natively nor in any "matrixed" fashion.*

 

Would you like it to sound like the professional recording engineers experienced it in their control rooms and testing facilities when skillfully mixing and crafting the soundtrack? Then again, don't use "front wides" because the recording engineers didn't use them, nor do they encode any such channels into the actual movie soundtrack, natively (discretely)  nor matrixed.*

 

If your intent is the faithful reproduction of the movie as the artists who made the movie intended you to hear it, aka "high fidelity", meaning as high a level of truthfulness and accurate reproduction as is possible, then don't add (or subtract) anything from the original soundtrack. [See my signature below this post.]

 

*Selden Ball has brought to our attention in a  previous post that in the over ten thousand Blu-ray discs released,  "The Expendables 2" would be an exception since it has been re-mixed for "Neo:X". [Also "Dredd 3D" and "Step Up 4: Revolution 3D"]. Not that any of these were played in the actual movie theaters using extra front channels.


Edited by m. zillch - 10/6/13 at 7:36pm
post #2246 of 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprogk View Post

Thanks Selden Ball

So I'm good to go with the amp I have. Will I get to use the Ref 7 ii to their full potential with that AVR?
The other questions was, does the front wides makes a big difference while watching moves?

Thanks
Sprog

Yes, as others that have added the Front Wides have posted, doing so offers a more enveloping surround effect and as Audyssey themselves have noted, much more so than adding either the Front Heights or Rear Surrounds.
post #2247 of 2387
Thanks jdsmoothie.

And is your opinion same as Seldon's regarding the 7005 handling both Ref 82's and Ref 7's from a power point of view?
So does auddysesy create additional channels of audio when front wides are used?

M.zillch

I'm no audio file, just enjoy music/movies from quality products.
If the front wides produce a more enveloping effect I would try it since I want to get the Ref 7's either way. If I don't like it, I will sell the Ref82's at a later stage.

Thanks
Sprog
post #2248 of 2387

That's fine.

----

 

Millions of people love the sound of their stereo's "loudness button" engaged, or an elevated bass response, but that doesn't mean it is "more accurate" and more faithful to the original live performance. When I watch a movie I don't want "more enveloping spaciousness"; I want the correct amount of spaciousness that the recording engineers painstakingly dialed in for me to hear. For example, a scene in a small doctor's office should have almost none, whereas a scene in a large, empty lecture hall should have lots.

 

The thing is, it is difficult to compare their DSX front/wides system to an actual movie house experience, due to the fleeting nature of acoustic memory. Say their system makes the sound of a telephone ringing in the adjacent room, in the movie, seem diffuse and "all around us" yet the actual recording engineer wanted us to hear it from only a specific direction. Is that an improvement? Would we remember that subtle detail when hearing the alternate system, hours if not days later?

 

We know that early side reflections are critically important to our perception of spaciousness and perceived room size, true, so "front wides" makes sense if one were designing a new surround format from scratch. The thing is, Audyssey DSX, and some other systems like it, have to guess what to put there. The channels are entirely synthetic and are concocted from analyzing the other actual channels. The specifics of exactly how their proprietary algorithm works is a secret. All we are told is:

 

- it is very good, trust us, we have done lots of research

- we know all about psychoacoustics, so we know what we are doing

- how much better is it? It's like 512 times better (using some arbitrary unit we won't disclose). Oh wait, no, that's the XT32 system, sorry.:p

 

Unfortunately the science minded writers, like David Ranada, who would address issues like this with a critical mind and measurements, are pretty much all gone. All we are left with are the typical "audiophile experts" who do nothing more than repeat the manufacturer's company line, almost verbatim: "sophisticated proprietary algorithm", "wides are more important than heights", "based on psychoacoustics, the science of the perception of sound", "more enveloping", blah, blah, blah.

 

Me? Unless I'm shown exactly how their algorithm works, instead of being told "it's a proprietary secret", I'm sticking with the system which most closely reflects how actual movie theater systems work: No heights, no wides. The recording engineers didn't use them, the actual movie theaters didn't use them; I'm not using them.

 

The question is not "Will adding front wides make a noticeable difference?", the question is "Will the alteration be closer to what the recording artists intended me to hear, while simultaneously being free of any unwanted artifacts? Or is it more of a gimmick?"


Edited by m. zillch - 10/6/13 at 11:39pm
post #2249 of 2387
A contrarian view is that home entertainment systems are purchased to entertain you at home. If you get more enjoyment from the expanded audio environment provided by any of the various expansion algorithms (Dolby ProLogic, DTS Neo or Audyssey DXT), then feel free to use them.

FWIW, I still have only a 5.1 system, but only because I've been frustrating over which 11.2 system to get. wink.gif
post #2250 of 2387

By all means. For people who don't understand the definition of "high fidelity" [see my signature] or have no interest in it as a goal, for whatever reason, they should feel free to make adjustments to their system that they find pleasing to their ear, to their personal taste, not accurate and faithful to the source. My goal is "sound reproduction", where I am attempting to accurately reproduce the original artist's work with as little distortion and adulteration as is possible (within my budget).

 

I pretty much always listen to music and video using the native format. I listen to stereo in 2ch [well, 2.1] and 5.1 in 5.1, but I never generate artificial channels which are claimed to "enhance" the work. To me that would be like colorizing a classic B&W film such as Casablanca. I consider it a slap in the face to the original artists. "You don't mess with another person's art."


Edited by m. zillch - 10/7/13 at 9:00am
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