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Inception - Page 14

post #391 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

It would be nice if WB dropped their outdated VC-1 encoders for the newest AVC and stopped with the low bitrate dips.

They've gone AVC with The Town...

... But they've apparently encoded the theatrical and extended versions separately.

Warner - seemingly getting better, still not quite getting it right.
post #392 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by jime1977 View Post

They've gone AVC with The Town...

... But they've apparently encoded the theatrical and extended versions separately.

Warner - seemingly getting better, still not quite getting it right.


Average Bitrate: 13.95 Mbps / 13.97 Mbps
post #393 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by jime1977 View Post

They've gone AVC with The Town...

... But they've apparently encoded the theatrical and extended versions separately.

At first, I was like, "Why on earth would they do that?"

But, I've seen the Extended Cut... Almost every scene has something added (and in some parts, taken away) in the extended cut. So, I guess it made more sense to them to just put two different cuts rather than do a nonsensical amount of seamless branching.

Also, I'm not worried about the bitrate. I've seen a 4gb 720p rip, and that looked really great. So, I guess I'll be happy with the full size 1080p rip.
post #394 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

It would be nice if WB dropped their outdated VC-1 encoders for the newest AVC and stopped with the low bitrate dips.

I think you missing the key difference between a codec and encoder. The codecs cant be improved after the format specification is finalized, or else it would be impossible for older players to decode the movie. You can however improve the encoder, but that has little to do with the codec.

Quote:


I've noticed that many of their Blu-rays are indeed softer than from other studios... and low and behold... their bitrates actually do dip below 10 Mbps in scenes you would think would be encoded at around 20 or so.

Apples and oranges since every movie is unique. But what scene do you think need 20 mbs?

They didnt as an example use a DI for the entire movie of Inception (just some scenes), this moves down the master a couple of generation from the negative, compared to alot of other movies that uses DI for the entire movie.

Quote:


By using lower average bitrates, that forces them to use heavier doses of high frequency filtering to make it easier on the encoder.

Why does they need to use High frequensy filtering? It you want to encode with lower bitrate, you just encode with lower bitrate.
post #395 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

It would be nice if WB dropped their outdated VC-1 encoders for the newest AVC and stopped with the low bitrate dips.

I've noticed that many of their Blu-rays are indeed softer than from other studios... and low and behold... their bitrates actually do dip below 10 Mbps in scenes you would think would be encoded at around 20 or so.

By using lower average bitrates, that forces them to use heavier doses of high frequency filtering to make it easier on the encoder.

Are these grotesquely uninformed generalizatons, or do you have data or information to back this up?

And I don't understand the encoder comment at all, as just pointed out above.
post #396 of 487
It was... okay. Carry on.
post #397 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeAd MiKe 187 View Post
When I saw it in IMAX, I had some trouble hearing a lot of lines. When I saw it again at my regular theater, I heard everything perfectly except for a couple of Ken's lines which were a little lower than usual (I still heard them, but they were much lower).
We saw it at the Uptown in DC (non-IMAX). I had trouble w/ Ken's lines as well. Although I studied Japanese in the past, and generally can focus past people's accents, I thought his heavy accent gave me trouble. Maybe his voice is just softer, or maybe he was recorded poorly, or a combination of all these things.

Doug
post #398 of 487
This movie has the most ridiculous score I've ever heard. It's hilarious. Good flick.
post #399 of 487
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoraster View Post

This movie has the most ridiculous score I've ever heard. It's hilarious. Good flick.

South park pointed it out recently
post #400 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoraster View Post

This movie has the most ridiculous score I've ever heard. It's hilarious. Good flick.

The score for the Dark Knight (especially during scenes with the Joker) was similar; I suppose you could classify it as "ridiculous" - I think it works great with the story, and helps to ramp up the intensity...
post #401 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvdmike007 View Post

South park pointed it out recently

And they TOTALLY ripped off the 'Funny or Die' spoof in the process. I read that they thought the Funny or Die spoof was using the actual lines from the movie, which is why they ripped it off so hard. I don't think that's a fair excuse since it was almost a line for line rip-off.
post #402 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklee View Post

I suppose you could classify it as "ridiculous" - I think it works great with the story, and helps to ramp up the intensity...

Oh it's ridiculous. Every piece is a bombastic seemingly endless crescendo.

Thanks for the South Park tip. I loved the special dream operative they brought in at the end.
post #403 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougotte View Post

We saw it at the Uptown in DC (non-IMAX). I had trouble w/ Ken's lines as well.

I couldn't understand half of what he said but it didn't make any difference so I assumed it was intentional.
post #404 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by shesha View Post

IMHO------this is the best new movie I have seen in a long long time.

Where it stands in my top 10 I'll see in a few years. This movie exceeded the hype for me.

I don't get how anyone could comment that its just "ok".
This is 10/10.

Agreed. I saw it twice in the theater. The first time, upon being asked how was the movie, without even thinking about it, I replied, "It's a masterpiece."

I still feel that way.
post #405 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by x43x View Post

Ridiculously awesome.

I agree. I put the soundtrack on my mp3 player months ago and it makes ordinary moments seem much more interesting during my runs on the street. An old lady walking down the avenue or a car approaching as "Half Remembered Dream" or "Mombassa" are reaching crescendos makes everyday moments transcend the ordinary and move into sublime territory. Hey, at least it takes my mind off my aching feet!
post #406 of 487
Any more PQ comments/observations?
post #407 of 487
Yes. Worst soft shot on this movie:



I always blamed the projectionist in the theaters for not getting Arthur's head in focus at all, but it was all for naught.

On that same token, here are the most beautiful shots:







post #408 of 487
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

Yes. Worst soft shot on this movie:



I always blamed the projectionist in the theaters for not getting Arthur's head in focus at all, but it was all for naught.

On that same token, here are the most beautiful shots:


PIX

You can really tell the Vistvision shots
post #409 of 487
During that shot of Arthur I kept waiting for one of my guests to ask what happened to the picture.
post #410 of 487
I found Inception to be both excellent AND overrated.
post #411 of 487
Wally Pfister and Chris Nolan HATE the DI process. They love photochemical timing. They are always a ton of soft shots in their movies because they don't go the digital route. The exceptions are the VistaVision shots (because they'll still retain a lot of resolution) and any shots that have to go the DI route for visual effects.

There were a number of shots with horribly clipped black levels because that's simply how they were filmed. They're movies certainly look more "filmic," so it's a trade off. In general, I like the look of Nolan films (minus the lack of sharpness) simply because they don't look like The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3. A lot of Hollywood movies go silly overboard in color correction.

EDIT: IMDb indicates that 65mm was used in a few places.
post #412 of 487
This disc looks and sounds quite good. One question:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
In the movie's first sequence, we get Drenched Cobb and Old Saito at the table chatting. Then suddenly it's Middle-aged Saito and Dry Cobb, and the mini-heist sequence unfolds.

I know we come back to the drenched Cobb and Old Saito scene at movie's end, when it's been (more or less) explained, but I was just wondering how the positioning of the initial Old Saito/Drenched Cobb scene at the beginning can make sense.


Thoughts?
post #413 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penman View Post

This disc looks and sounds quite good. One question:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
In the movie's first sequence, we get Drenched Cobb and Old Saito at the table chatting. Then suddenly it's Middle-aged Saito and Dry Cobb, and the mini-heist sequence unfolds.

I know we come back to the drenched Cobb and Old Saito scene at movie's end, when it's been (more or less) explained, but I was just wondering how the positioning of the initial Old Saito/Drenched Cobb scene at the beginning can make sense.


Thoughts?

Nolan has done that in 3 or 4 of his other films (start with a scene near the end or at the end, and then go to the beginning, and then show how we got to that scene). It's a technique called 'in media res.' At first, I analyzed it and thought about it like you are, and then I remembered that Nolan likes doing that and I stopped thinking about it.

I really don't think it was done for any other reason other than to confuse us and start the next scene 'in media res,' too - just like all dreams seem to start.
post #414 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeAd MiKe 187 View Post

Nolan has done that in 3 or 4 of his other films (start with a scene near the end or at the end, and then go to the beginning, and then show how we got to that scene). It's a technique called 'in media res.' At first, I analyzed it and thought about it like you are, and then I remembered that Nolan likes doing that and I stopped thinking about it.

I really don't think it was done for any other reason other than to confuse us and start the next scene 'in media res,' too - just like all dreams seem to start.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I would have liked to think that way as well, but then I realized that they are indeed different scenes just from dialogue alone.
post #415 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I would have liked to think that way as well, but then I realized that they are indeed different scenes just from dialogue alone.

It just seems like neither scene has the 'entire' scene in it, and that bits were left out of both scenes so it wouldn't be as repetitive. That's why the second time we see it, we don't hear the dialog from the guards, etc.
post #416 of 487
Thanks, DeadMike.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The Drenched Cobb/Old Saito confrontation happens while they're dreaming on the 747, so it is a tad sloppy/misleading for Nolan to fuse it seamlessly with the Saito "test" heist, which happens while Cobb, Saito, et al., are on the bullet train.


But I'll try to take your advice and not think about it.
post #417 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penman View Post

Thanks, DeadMike.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The Drenched Cobb/Old Saito confrontation happens while they're dreaming on the 747, so it is a tad sloppy/misleading for Nolan to fuse it as part of the Saito "test" heist, which happens while Cobb, Saito, et al., are on the bullet train.


But I'll try to take your advice and not think about it.

Haha! By all means, analyze it if you wish (this is, after all, a fun film to analyze), but I just don't see what Nolan would be trying to accomplish if the scene was not simple 'in media res.' I just remember my feeling when the scene switched from old to young. I was like, "Uhhh... What!?" And then when the scene happened again at the end, I was like, "Ohhhhhhhh! I see what they did there."
post #418 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeAd MiKe 187 View Post

It just seems like neither scene has the 'entire' scene in it, and that bits were left out of both scenes so it wouldn't be as repetitive. That's why the second time we see it, we don't hear the dialog from the guards, etc.

Again, that's what I thought as well, but there are differences.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
In the beginning, I believe Saito asks, "Have you come to kill me?" In the end, he asks, "Are you here to kill me?" In the beginning, Saito says the "half-remembered dream" line, and in the end Cobb says it. I know they skip some parts (and in a way they kind of jump to the last part that they were at at the beginning, for the end), but they are indeed different.

And yet, no one will really ever know why. It's strange how that works.
post #419 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

Again, that's what I thought as well, but there are differences.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
In the beginning, I believe Saito asks, "Have you come to kill me?" In the end, he asks, "Are you here to kill me?" In the beginning, Saito says the "half-remembered dream" line, and in the end Cobb says it. I know they skip some parts (and in a way they kind of jump to the last part that they were at at the beginning, for the end), but they are indeed different.

And yet, no one will really ever know why. It's strange how that works.

Yeah. Reminds me of the famous line from 'Pulp Fiction' (which I can't repeat due to all of the curse words) being one way in the opening scene, and very different once we actually get to that scene at the end of the movie. I don't know why this stuff happens...
post #420 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeAd MiKe 187 View Post

Yeah. Reminds me of the famous line from 'Pulp Fiction' (which I can't repeat due to all of the curse words) being one way in the opening scene, and very different once we actually get to that scene at the end of the movie. I don't know why this stuff happens...

Nolan did it for a reason, but I'm trying my best to connect the dots. Whatever the case, it probably has everything to do with the answer to the question people might as at the very end of the movie as well.

In a way, we were nearly given a double feature solely based on how that question is answered. That answer will change how you would view the entire movie as we know it, including the scene(s) we're mentioning.

BTW I got those lines reversed in the beginning and ending part, my bad.
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