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The NEW Gaming Headset/Headphone Topic! (REQUEST STICKY PLZ) - Page 175

post #5221 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper187 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

I never had any of the problems that you mentioned w/ my X41's, they were phenomenal. Only dumped 'em so I could go completely wireless...

Read much? You're not the one who hears the ****. The people on the other end are.

Think much? Thank you for pointing out the manifestly obvious. NO ONE I ever played with(same group for several years now) had so much as a comment about it. In fact one of 'em actually went w/ the X41's on my recommendation. He still raves about them to this day as a matter of fact.
post #5222 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper187 View Post

No, it seems you missed the part where I said "NOT some ****ing little bluetooth POS," which is exactly what microsoft's wireless headset offerings are. It's not the same as the OEM wired headset. The wired one is actually a headset. The bluetooth/wireless thing is not. Also, the settings mean nothing when it's your own friends doing it to you half the time. The screeching/tone/static broadcasting through should be preventable on the hardware end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper187 View Post

p.s. I'd kill for a wireless version of the standard microsoft mic that's exactly the same as the wired one

Either you want wireless. Or you don't.

I gave you 3 options. All 3 offer non-bluetooth wireless connectivity.

The first two options have absolutely no bluetooth connectivity whatsoever. But are still wireless. Whats the problem?
post #5223 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Think much? Thank you for pointing out the manifestly obvious. NO ONE I ever played with(same group for several years now) had so much as a comment about it. In fact one of 'em actually went w/ the X41's on my recommendation. He still raves about them to this day as a matter of fact.

In his defense I've heard the same thing from some Turtle Beach owners I play with. They'll disconnect because of range or something and there's a loud buzzing sound. It's not always but it's definitely there.
post #5224 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post


Either you want wireless. Or you don't.

I gave you 3 options. All 3 offer non-bluetooth wireless connectivity.

The first two options have absolutely no bluetooth connectivity whatsoever. But are still wireless. Whats the problem?

The problem is they're still stupid earpieces, not physically the same as the wired headset. I want something like that with no wires.
post #5225 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcweber111 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Think much? Thank you for pointing out the manifestly obvious. NO ONE I ever played with(same group for several years now) had so much as a comment about it. In fact one of 'em actually went w/ the X41's on my recommendation. He still raves about them to this day as a matter of fact.

In his defense I've heard the same thing from some Turtle Beach owners I play with. They'll disconnect because of range or something and there's a loud buzzing sound. It's not always but it's definitely there.

I'm sure there's got to be SOME problems somewhere(after selling x number of units), especially when you're dealing w/ 2.4ghz. I'd say overall though most are satisfied w/ the product.
post #5226 of 5436
The latest update is up!







Creative Aurvana Live! (aka "CAL")



Sells for $100 (or less).
Review (Click to show)
Creative and Fostex partnered up to give us the relatively inexpensive Creative Aurvana Live. It shares most of it's design with the discontinued Denon D1001, with the same bio cellulose drivers, and very few, superficial differences. From what I have personally read, the Creative Aurvana Live has been known to be the slightly superior of the two sonically, made even better at the fact that the CAL was the less expensive of the two, and is still sold today. The CAL can be considered as the baby sibling of the incredibly popular and discontinued Denon D2000, D5000, D7000 headphones, all which came with bio-cellulose Fostex drivers.

Build Quality: The CAL is known as a small circumaural. Not as small as typical on ear headphones, but not as large as most full sized headphones. The CAL is incredibly lightweight. It has a classy piano black, glossy finish on the plastic cups with chrome accents, the only thing on the cups being Creative branding. The headband has both metal and plastic pieces, relatively thin as well. The headband padding is covered in some smooth but quality, synthetic pleather.

The pads are also made up of synthetic leather/pleather, and are quite soft. The pads are on the small side for a circumaural headphone, with a lack of width and depth for bigger ears.

The CAL's cable is personally what I find to be it's worst aspect in terms of build quality. Each cup houses a thin, somewhat flimsy cable which meet just over a foot down the cable's length. The cable is quite short, terminating into a small 3.5mm plug. Good thing the CAL comes with an extension cable. The cables are rubbery and will 'grip' onto everything, which I personally find quite annoying.



Comfort:

The Creative Aurvana Live! is a rarity for me in terms of comfort. I tend to hate headphones with pleather pads, especially closed headphones. I personally find the CAL to be quite comfortable. It is odd, as not only is it pleather padded (very soft pads), but the pads aren't wide or deep, so my ears press up against the drivers and the inner walls of the pads. This is usually disastrous for a headphone's long-term wearing comfort, yet, I don't find the CAL to be problematic. Perhaps it's due to how light the CAL is, and how the CAL doesn't exactly exert a lot of clamping pressure. That being said, I do know that a lot of people have issues with these very things, so keep that in mind.


Design Issues:

As stated earlier, the pads are neither deep nor wide, so larger ears may find their ears pressing against the drivers.



Accessories:

The CAL comes with a small, cloth carrying pouch, an extension cable, and a gold-plated 6.3mm adapter. The carrying pouch won't offer any real protection from anything other than scratches/scuffs.



Isolation/Leakage:

The CAL is exactly like the other Fostex/Denon 'marriage' headphones. They do not isolate that well for a closed headphone. They DO keep from leaking internal noise out to the world quite well, but aren't the best at keeping external noise from leaking in. Better than an open headphone, but far from the best at external noise control. Long story short, if you want a headphone that keeps noise OUT, the CAL is not it. However, if you want a late night headphone that won't bother other people around you (i.e. the sleeping girlfriend), the CAL is quite proficient in noise leak.



Sound:

The Creative Aurvana Live is a wonderful sounding headphone. It's relatively warm, spacious, and detailed. It has a fantastic balance of bass, mids, and treble, not usually found in their price range. It's not a neutral headphone, but for a sub-$100 headphone, it's clearly one of the best headphones I've ever heard, if not THE best. Fostex knows their headphones. The CAL is warm, bassy (bot not overly so), with smooth mids, and detailed treble, without being overbearing. Mostly organic, and natural sounding, with few caveats.



Bass:

The CAL's bass is warm, full, rich, organic, and soft hitting. Not particularly quick, but well integrated with the mids, giving the CAL it's deliciously warm tonality. It's emphasized, but never truly overbearing. One of the best I've heard in terms of ambience, emphasis, and integration.



Mids:

The CAL has organic, fluid mids. Not incredibly rich or forward, but very well behaved, balanced, and again, expertly integrated. It in all honesty, the CAL puts some of the more expensive headphones to shame. Bassy headphones tend to ruin mids in some form or another. Not so with the CAL. If you like a good amount of bass, and don't want to sacrifice vocals, the CAL makes a WONDERFUL headphone for those purposes. The only real negative aspect to the mids is that the upper mids/lower treble may at times come off just a little thin. Not recessed or lacking, but not as organic and natural.



Treble:

The treble is probably the weakest aspect of the CAL's sound. Note: I said WEAKEST. Not that it was bad in general. The treble has nice amount of presence and energy. Not particularly aggressive or sharp. It has a good mix of smoothness and sparkle. The lower treble may have just a hint of glare, but it's rarely ever problematic.



Soundstage:

In true Fostex fashion, the CAL has a truly impressive soundstage. It is a closed headphone, yet instrument separation and a virtual sense of space this big is just unheard of in most closed headphones, regardless of price range. Sure, it's not going to trump the well known open soundstages of headphones like the DT990, K70x, and X1, but even next to those, the CAL's soundstage will still impress. Not the deepest, or widest, but very good all around.



Positioning:

The CAL has very good positional cues. Positional cues are very well defined, with plenty of virtual space to maneuver. Among the best closed headphones in this regard.



Clarity:

The CAL's clarity if quite impressive, especially considering the price. Despite the CAL leaning on musicality and not neutrality, the warm, bassy nature of the CAL does not detract from it's well presented mids and good treble range. Nothing is ever truly lost, making the CAL a solid gaming headphone if you want clarity without sacrificing musicality and overall enjoyment for the sake of sound-whoring.



Amping:

The Creative Aurvana Live! is an efficient headphone, demanding minimal amping. It benefits more from a clean source, and not so much power. Mixamp owners will have no problem using the Mixamp alone to power the CAL.



Value:

At under $100, the Creative Aurvana Live is what I consider to be the epitome of bang for buck headphones. I have compared it directly to other, considerably more expensive headphones, and personally found the CAL to either meet or exceed their performance. If you want an inexpensive, efficient, and fantastic sounding headphone, the CAL is practically begging for your money.



Comparisons:

Audio Technica ATH-M50: The CAL/Denon D1001 were always stacked up and compared to the M50 due to a somewhat similar price range and similar strengths/weaknesses. I personally find the CAL and M50 to be on a very comparable performance/technical level, though they aren't exactly similar.

The M50s are more aggressive, while the CAL is more laidback with a better sense of depth and width. The M50 has a sharper, faster attack in the bass and more bite in the treble, making it a bit more dynamic than the CAL, and better suited for faster genres like metal. However, the M50 has a smaller, more congested soundstage, which pales in comparison to the excellent soundstage on the CAL.

Ultimately, this means the CAL is a softer, more relaxed (but never boring), more polite, less fatiguing alternative to the M50. It is also clearly superior to the M50 for gaming due to a bigger soundstage and better positional cues.

The M50 has a much more rugged, durable, build quality, and can stand a bit more abuse than the CAL.



Final Impressions:

The Creative Aurvana Live! is a not so hidden gem in the headphone community. The secret came out years ago, and with good reason. Fantastic warm tonality, good bass presence, fluid mids, with a truly spacious soundstage, all for an incredibly affordable price. Then one true drawback on the CAL may be that it's comfort level may be good for some, not for others. I believe it's truly worth checking out.



Final Scores...

Fun: 8/10 (Great. Full, warm, immersive, and entertaining)

Competitive: 7.25/10 (Good. Even for a warm and slightly reserved sound signature, the soundstage and positional cues are good for competitive play).

Comfort: 8 (Great. Even for a small circumaural, I find them to be very comfortable, with the only negatives being that the pads are shallow and small and may crush other's ears. I didn't have issues with it though.)











Nuforce HP-800
Nuforce Website


https://www.nuforce.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=311:nh-800&Itemid=194

Sells for $129
Review (Click to show)

I'd like to thank Wolfgang, NuForce's social marketing specialist for contacting me, and giving me the opportunity to test and review the Nuforce HP-800. Very much appreciated.

Okay, so the Nuforce HP-800. Prior to Nuforce contacting me, I must admit, I knew absolutely nothing about the HP-800. All I have known about Nuforce has been what I've read about the quite popular UDAC, UDAC2, Icon, and HDP dac/amps. I certainly had no idea that Nuforce had jumped into the headphone game. The HP-800 is Nuforce's first entry into full-sized headphones.

So the question is: How was Nuforce's first foray into full-sized headphones?



Build Quality:

Before I get into the aspects of it's design, I'd like to address one thing: I believe the HP-800 may have been designed with portable use in mind, yet the HP-800 is not portable by any conventional means. It's large, and doesn't fold up in any shape or form. This betrays it's incredibly minimal power requirements. The design will easily place the HP-800 as a home or studio headphone, not a portable one. Quite some large head bling here. The HP-800 does fit well as a transportable headphone, like office or library use with a laptop.

The HP-800 is a fully closed-back headphone which is made up almost entirely of very sturdy and solid feeling plastic in a full black matte finish. That means fingerprint resistant, which is always a good thing. I grow tired of high gloss plastic that looks good as long as you have psychic powers and never physically touch the headphones. The design of the HP-800 is quite minimalistic, which would feel at home next to typical studio headphones you can purchase from the musical instrument section of any major electronics stores like Best Buy. It is almost entirely black, with the only contrasts being the driver covers being red/orange, and a golden metallic 'NU' logo on the center of each outer ear cup.

The headband is of the auto-adjusting, tension/suspension type, similar to the popular AKG K70x line, as well as the recent Philips Fidelio X1. The headband portion that rests on your head is made up of a very rubbery material that has quite a grip. This is the first time I have seen such a material being used, and I'm not sure it was the best choice. I find that this rubbery material is prone to picking up dust and dirt from the air, and is not exactly easy to wipe off.

The top portion that holds the wires that sends audio to the right driver is all plastic, and as such, I wouldn't recommend bending it if you feel like the HP-800 doesn't have enough extension, in fear of possibly snapping the plastic. This makes the HP-800 a possible problem for bigger heads, as you can't really bend the HP-800 in any way, unlike the Fidelio X1 which has a metal band that is easily bent for more extension.

The pads are synthetic leather/pleather. They're quite large, and very soft. Personally (as you may all know by now), I have a strong aversion for pleather pads, so I'm not exactly thrilled by the abundance of it on the HP-800. The pads, while big, don't have the largest openings, and they compress quite easily, so those with larger ears may find their ears pressing up against the driver covers, and inner walls of the pads.

The HP-800's left ear cup comes with a standard 3.5mm input, no locking mechanism, so cable replacement is a breeze. Speaking of the cables, the HP-800 comes with two cables: A cloth-covered long cable that terminates into a 3.5mm plug, with an attached 6.3mm adapter which screws on/off. One of the better stock cables I've ever come across. The shorter, thinner cable doesn't inspire much confidence in it's build quality, and unlike the lengthier cable, lacks proper strain reliefs. I'd stick with the longer cable, or buy a more durable short cable for portable use.



Comfort:

The comfort will be a hit or miss. The HP-800 may be problematic for larger heads, in that there may not be enough clearance, due to the lack of extension. My head fits, but the strong tension causes the cups to want to ride up my ears ever so slightly. This could've been mitigated with a longer extension.

The headband portion that rests on the top of the head is covered in very rubbery material which can and will grip onto your scalp or hair, so any small adjustments will yank a bit. This is only an issue if you're constantly shifting and readjusting.

The pads are quite soft and plentiful. Being synthetic leather (which I'm not a fan of on ANY headphone), they will heat up and get a little sticky. As mentioned before, the openings aren't the largest, so larger ears may have to struggle between pressing up to the driver covers and pinching up against the inner pad walls.

The HP-800 is quite lightweight, so they shouldn't pose much of an issue for those with neck problems. All in all, the HP-800 will cater to smaller heads and ears. Everyone else should try and demo these first.

The HP-800 doesn't exude much clamping force, and the little it does have will keep the HP-800 from sliding off the head. Needless to say, the HP-800 has an ideal amount of clamp to my ears without being too loose, or too clampy.

Overall, the HP-800 is among the better pleather-padded headphones I have reviewed on this guide, in terms of comfort. That means, that if you don't have a particular distaste for pleather, you may find the HP-800 to be relatively comfortable overall. Personally, I find them okay in comfort, and mostly inoffensive, my main issue being the pads.



Design Issues:

- Not particularly suited for portable use due to a very large frame, despite it's minimal amping requirements.

- Rubbery headband padding may grip onto the scalp/hair, potentially causing discomfort with every minor adjustment. Also picks up dirt/dust easily (the top side of the rubbery headband).

- Pleather pads, while soft, build up heat in a hurry, and will stick to the skin. They also do not have the biggest openings, so those with large ears, take note.

- Lack of extension for larger heads will cause the cups to pull and rise up towards the headband.



Accessories:

The HP-800 comes with:

- One long, durable, cloth-braided cable w/3.5mm plug with an attached screwed on 6.3mm adapter.

- One short, thin cable w/3.5mm plug

- Carrying pouch



Isolation/Leakage:

The HP-800 as a fully closed-back headphone does incredibly well at keeping it's sound from escaping out into the world. This means that you can blast the HP-800 loudly, and very little will actually leak out, making it an ideal headphone for late night use when you're trying to keep your significant other in the same room from waking up. It's been quite some time since I've heard a headphone control noise leak as well as the HP-800, the last one being the Mad Dogs.

The HP-800 however isn't exactly great at keep external noise from leaking in, so it's not the best at passive noise-cancelling. It's not bad, but not the best.



Sound:

The HP-800 is unlike anything I've ever heard upon first listen. It's quite warm/dark most of the time, yet spacious, which I usually find to be quite a contradiction. Very much so. Coming off more neutral and brighter offerings, the HP-800 will sound stuffy and muted (it even makes the well known Creative Aurvana Live! sound bright in comparison). In fact, prior to hearing the Sennheiser HD650, my perception of it's sound just based on impressions I've read online (which didn't turn out to be true), I would've thought it'd sound something like how the HP-800 actually sounds like. Dark, creamy, and smooth, if a bit veiled. The only difference being that the HD650 is known for it's stellar and intimate mids, which the HP-800 just does not have.

Quite bassy, with fairly distant sounding mids, and mellow treble that sounds pretty up to par with the mids. For a closed, dark, mellow sounding headphone, I feel the soundstage to be quite spacious, more than likely due to how distant the mids sound. To be quite honest, I was thrown off by it's sound signature. However, given some time, I adapted to it's tonal characteristics, and found it to have a charm I'd say is all it's own.

It isn't the most detailed headphone by a stretch, but it is relatively enjoyable, pleasant, and fatigue free. I feel it's best suited for hip hop, and general club music with most importance in the pulse of the rhythm. For this reason, I find the HP-800 to be very genre specific.

All of that being said, the HP-800 is almost a completely different beast for virtual surround gaming use. Even though the headphone is dark and mellow, the linearity between the mids and treble makes it easy to maintain a good mix for gaming purposes. Because bass is situational in gaming and not overly dominant, you can raise volume levels to put the mids and treble into better focus (not overly so), making the HP-800 a competent, fun oriented, gaming headphone.



Bass:

Big, impressive, and dominating bass. It will be the first thing you immediately notice when listening to the HP-800. However, what sets itself apart, is that the bass is fairly linear (though quite emphasized from the mids and treble ranges). The sub bass is actually quite decent, and the mid bass is proficient in fullness, presence, and control. The bass is on the slower side, but doesn't creep into the mids. I expected this soft, yet full bass to swallow the mids, but the HP-800's control is pretty apparent.



Mids:

The mids are a paradox on it's own. The HP-800's bass doesn't swallow up the mids, and the treble isn't by any means bright or emphasized over the mids, yet the mids are a bit recessed to my ears. Almost undoubtedly so. The mids are warm and full-bodied, yet...distant. I'm at odds with the HP-800 because of this. It takes time to get used to.

I'm not entirely against recessed mids on a headphone (I do generally like a mild v-shaped sound signature), yet when a headphone is clearly NOT v-shaped, you'd expect mids to be either in tune with the rest of the sound, or up front and center. The HP-800's mids are a little off putting at first. Not a gaping void, but noticeably pushed back.


Treble:

The treble range is more or less in line with the mids in emphasis, meaning that they aren't in the spotlight, and are just a tad laid back, but not more so than the mids. They are in the comfortable range of being smooth, and sibilance free. Treble in instruments isn't exactly the sharpest, nor the clearest, ultimately making the HP-800 lack just a bit detail.

A bit glossed over, but completely inoffensive to the ears. I find the treble to be a strength when you play the HP-800 at a moderately loud volume, as it never gets harsh. Comparing the treble to the Creative Aurvana Live, I found the HP-800 to sound less detailed, but smoother, and less fatiguing.



Soundstage:

The soundstage is a surprisingly good thing in the HP-800. It's wide for a closed headphone, and thought not excelling in depth, there is decent amount of virtual space. I'll touch more on this in the next section.



Positioning:

Positional cues are good. Not great but good. The HP-800 has a pretty good soundstage in width, but not necessarily the best in depth. Also, positional cues in certain angles sound a bit diffused. The HP-800's positional cues take up a bit more virtual space, and aren't as precise. In the end, the HP-800 gets the job done, but there are better, and cheaper in this regard.



Clarity:

Clarity isn't exactly a super strong suit in the HP-800. I do find it to be objectively clearer for gaming purposes in virtual surround gaming than it is for stereo/music use (or any non-virtual surround uses for that matter). Due to the fact that the HP-800 is pretty closely even in mids and treble, nothing is lost in between, so within a certain amount of volume, the HP-800 makes a pretty decent gaming headphone, and mitigates the overall darkness somewhat.

You do have to somewhat tune out the abundant amount of bass that leads the mix, though because the bass doesn't smother other details, it isn't that arduous a task. All in all, not the clearest headphone, but relatively stable in the clarity it does have after the bass.



Amping:

While the HP-800 isn't the most sensitive full-sized headphone I've tested, it truly demands very little amping with a maximum input power of only 30MW. This means that practically any device you hook up the HP-800 up to will drive them loudly, and authoratively. As always, clean power is the best power, so while the effect may be subtle, a decent portable amp will benefit the HP-800 especially in controlling it's dominant, and somewhat slow bass. For gaming use, I found the Mixamp alone to be just fine for the HP-800. The HP-800 is already full bodied as is, even unamped.



Value:

The MSRP of the HP-800 is $129. In it's price range, it fills it's own niche, and for that reason competes well with others in it's price range, if you're looking into a somewhat unique sound signature, even amongst other dark/warm headphones. Bassheads in particular should take note.



Final Impressions:

I feel the HP-800 is a solid (though polarizing) headphone for those who'd like a closed back, pleasant, fatigue-free, warm headphone, with big bass, and solid noise leak control. I feel the HP-800 is a fairly competent closed headphone for virtual surround gaming, fun-oriented gaming in particular. Just remember, the HP-800 is bass first, everything else second. So unless you value a substantial amount of bass presence above everything else in a headphone's sound, you may want to do your homework.

Final Scores...

Fun: 7.5 (Very Good)

Competitive: 7 (Good)

Comfort: 6.75/10 (Quite decent)












Fiio E12 'Mont Blanc'



Sells for $130

Review (Click to show)
Pros:

+ Fully portable w/rechargeable battery (via micro usb port), sleek design, volume knob instead of digital button for volume control

+ Very clean, neutral sound, with optional bass boost (50hz range), and optional crossfeed (unheard of in the price range). Gain switch from 0-16db, capable of outputting illogically loud volume levels to practically every headphone short of electrostatics and harder to drive planar magnetics.

+ Very, very powerful portable amp, rivaling desktop amps like the Fiio E9K in power

+ Incredibly low output impedance for near universal compatibility with low/high impedance headphones

+ No need to hook up to a power outlet when using it to aid the Mixamp/other DH devices, meaning less clutter


Cons:

- Lack of versatility (one 3.5mm input, no outputs)

- Inputs/usb ports placed in illogical positions (headphone jack in the center, not to the side of the front plate, next to analog input, making it difficult to adjust the volume knob, with an awkward side usb port)
.
- Difficult to stack with Fiio's own E07k and E17 dac/amps due to mismatched inputs (for non-gaming use)

- Slight noise/interference in the signal if used while charging (if problematic, unplug the E12 while in use, and charge when not in use)



Personal notes:

The Fiio E12 is more or less ideal as the perfect amp to pair with the Mixamp/other DH devices when you need extra power. It's small, sleek, portable, and rechargeable. As mentioned, it doesn't need to be attached to a wall outlet like the desktop amps, making it highly ideal if you game away from a desktop setup.

It's a very clean, fast, neutral sounding portable amp (the most neutral Fiio amp). It has a generous amount of gain, so harder to drive headphone used with microphones for chat purposes won't be an issue (unless of course you're attempting to use something like the harder to drive planar magnetics like the HE-4, HE-5LE, HE-6, and electrostatics. It's not a desktop amp killer, but a desktop amp alternative.

The bass boost is really high quality from what I'm personally hearing, basically targeted at around 50hz, and not being a broad range bass boost which tends to be more intrusive. It will add a nice layer of warmth and impact. Though I don't find much use for the Crossfeed, it's there if you happen to own older recordings with really bad left/right stereo pannings which cause ear fatigue. Take note that crossfeed being on will noticeably reduce soundstage and merge the left/right channels slightly.

If you're OCD about having the quitest noise floor, bear in mind that usb charging may/will add some slight noise/interference. Slight.

I'd personally would still go for a desktop amp for 600ohm headphones, but anything 300ohm or less (again, with the harder to drive planarmagnetic/electristatic exceptions) should be fair game to the E12. That being said, the E12 is more than capable of at least driving 600ohm headphone like the DT990/600 to ear splitting levels.
post #5227 of 5436
Hi everyone.

I hope this isn't redundant, but the thread is so huge I'm having trouble finding what I'm looking for. Maybe I'm using the wrong term.

If I were to use a pair of Sennheiser PC350's or any other quality headset with my PS3 (and PS4), is it possible to monitor and adjust the volume of my own voice through the headphones? It's somewhat distracting when I can't tell if I'm yelling when the game noise gets loud.

Thank you.
post #5228 of 5436
Hello, got a problem that I've hunted the internet up and down trying to resolve. I hope I'm asking in the correct thread, if not I apologize.

I have a Sennheiser PC360 headset that I want to use with my Xbox 360. I also have the Turtle Beach DSS Dolby processor. I have the DSS hooked up via optical cable to the back of my Xbox and a USB A to mini B hooked into the front of the xbox to the DSS for power.

I have the mic cord plugged into a Headset Buddy Xbox adapter to convert it to 2.5mm. The sound works fine in the headset (amazing actually) but I cannot get the mic to work for the life of me. I've tried two different adapters to no avail. I plugged my Sennheisers into my laptop and the mic works fine, so it cannot be that.

The only two things I can think of is the headset buddy adapter is not working correctly (I wish I had another mic to try out) or the USB cord I am using is the problem. Its not the genuine Turtle Beach USB A to mini b cord.

Any help is greatly appreciated, I just want my darn headset to work!

Thanks.
post #5229 of 5436
From what I know of the DSS, the mic portion of it ONLY works with Turtle beach headsets.
post #5230 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven Crimson View Post

From what I know of the DSS, the mic portion of it ONLY works with Turtle beach headsets.

I was afraid of this. Looks like I'm going to have to get an Astro Mixamp after all.
post #5231 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stansellnater View Post

I was afraid of this. Looks like I'm going to have to get an Astro Mixamp after all.

I posted as such on my headphone guide (on head-fi). The first page here is quite outdated (almost 2 years since last update), but I can't get into my old account to update.

http://www.head-fi.org/t/534479/mad-lust-envys-headphone-gaming-guide-updated-8-17-2013-cal-nuforce-hp-800-fiio-e12-reviewed

Turtle Beach DSS (old version)



Dolby Headphone Device

(DISCONTINUED)
Review (Click to show)
Pros:

+ Cheapest DH device for console use

+ Preset EQs

+ Can take two inputs (3.5mm in, optical in)


Cons:

- Wired

- No integrated mic input. This means only Turtle beach headsets have chat capabilities. This can be resolved through the use of a direct mic input to the controller of a Xbox 360 and on the newer DSS 2 through the use of a usb soundcard dongle with 3.5mm out and 3.5mm in for PS3

- Louder background noise than the AX720 decoder, which scales with volume (unconfirmed)

- New version, the DSS2 does not use Dolby Headphone, and only simulates 4 speakers. It is unknown (so far) how it compares to Dolby Headphone.

- Does not decode DTS natively.

Edited by Raven Crimson - 8/20/13 at 4:19am
post #5232 of 5436
The best headphones with Mic for gaming are the Ultrasone Signature DJ. They are made for music and do a good job of it but also they are excellent for gaming with no distortion a solid sound stage through middle and high and the bass is the cheery on the top. FPS shooter are really immersive with the DJs. Also when the 3.5mm lead is used you can use the inbuilt Mic with the help of a stereo / Mic splitter adapter. Only down fall is they cost near $1,000 but are worth every cent thanks to the hand made quality and the fact they can be used with a whole host of gadgets mp3 players, pc, consoles, tablets, phones etc. Also no dac required!
post #5233 of 5436
Steelseries just unveiled this new headset, looks interesting.

http://steelseries.com/siberiaelite
post #5234 of 5436
Too bad they went with pleather pads again.
post #5235 of 5436
White was a good idea lol
post #5236 of 5436
So... any try both the turtle beach ear force x-rays and xp400? I know sound and build wise they should be almost exactly the same. Looks like the two main (non-aesthetic) differences are:

breathable mesh ear cushions vs. Memory Foam/pleather Ear Cushions and headband
wired xbox chat via talkback cable vs. bluetooth wireless xbox chat

I currently have the xp400 but the bluetooth wireless chat quality seems to be a worse than the stock 360 wired headset. My friends mentioned that my voice sounded weird (robotic) and that I was cutting out more than usual :\

Also interested to know if the memory foam and leather have actually increased comfort levels any?
post #5237 of 5436
Here comes another review...

Quote:
Sony MA900

700

Sells for $180
Review (Click to show)
The Sony MDR-MA900. MA900 for short. Modeled after Sony's own F1 and SA5000, the MA900 (like the F1) stands out in that there is a huge opening between the drivers and the rear side of the pads. I can honestly say I have never seen any other headphone with such an obvious lack of seal/isolation outside of the AKG K1000. It comes equipped with humongous 70mm drivers, which may be repurposed from the Sony XB1000, though unlike the XB1000, the MA900 is not placed in the Extra Bass line of Sony headphones, with good reason. I was always interested in the F1 for gaming/comfort purposes but I never took the plunge. I've since outgrown the desire to try the F1 and went on to pursue other ventures. With the release of the MA900, my interest in such a peculiar design was resurrected. The overwhelmingly positive impressions and reviews was the final straw, and I knew I just had to try them for myself if only to satiate my curiosity.


Build Quality:

Upon first glance, the build quality is suspect on the MA900. It is essentially two massive drivers surrounded in a black plastic-looking magnesium/aluminum alloy (it looks and feels like plastic to me) cups held by an incredibly thin headband that looks out of proportion with the massive cups. The cups are quite large, though for housing 70mm drivers, I expected, and have seen bigger. The color scheme is classic Sony black with silver Sony logos placed on the center of the outer cups with a thin silver accent separating the outer grill with the rest of the cups. The styling is pretty barebones overall. Not really what I'd call an aesthetic marvel, but they are inoffensive to the eyes, and won't bring attention to itself. I find the cups themselves to look quite nice, despite the basic, somewhat retro look.

The thin size adjustment mechanism is pretty standard fare, if a bit too loose for my taste. There are no markers/notches, so if you're OCD about having both sides at exactly the same length, you may need a measuring tool of some sort. On the center of the headband is a wider section covered in the same cloth material as the ear pads. The padding isn't generous nor is it horribly thin. It could stand to be a bit thicker, but with the MA900 being so incredibly lightweight, the headband is ultimately quite comfortable, if just a hint of a minor annoyance in comparison to everything else on the headphone.

The ear pads are placed on an angled portion of the cups (thus angling the drivers for optimal sound quality), and like the headband padding, are made up of a very breathable, cloth material. The pads used, paired with the huge cavity between the pads and the drivers ensure that your ears will stay cool for many hours. The ear pads are quite thin and lack density, and will flatten out quite easily. This is perhaps the most disappointing aspect of the MA900's design in terms of comfort. That's not saying much, as even though the pads flatten out, the pads are still incredibly comfortable. Still, had thicker, taller, denser pads been used, it would've improved the comfort to a legendary level. The driver cover is also made up of similar cloth material. Placed normally, your ears will more than likely press against the driver cover lightly, but for the vast majority of people, it won't be an issue.

The left cup houses the relatively thin and lengthy non-removable cable which terminates into a 3.5mm plug (6.3mm snap on gold-plated adapter included) with 'Thailand' embedded on the plug, letting everyone know where the headphones were made. The cable, while on the thinner side, isn't of the horrible, 'grippy' rubber material, and is instead smooth, quite flexible, and very lightweight. Neither the plug, nor the entrance to the headphone itself have robust strain reliefs, so I'd be careful in yanking the cable.

I believe they went with such a thin, seemingly frail design with some concessions made to it's build quality in order to keep the MA900 incredibly lightweight and non-intrusive on the head and ears. I don't expect the MA900 to fail me in terms of it's build, and I'm moderately careful with my headphones. So, it's not the sturdiest headphone, nor is it just going to crumble in your hands. I personally feel like they can be tossed around in a bag without too much worry. I'd mostly just be careful to not trip/run over the cable. In the end, I forgive Sony for going with this design, because I'm an absolute fan of their comfort. So much, that the MA900 is now the only headphone I wanna put on my head. Seriously.


Comfort:

This is perhaps the single most defining trait of the MA900. The MA900 is undeniably, and inarguably the most comfortable headphone I have ever worn. It seemingly weighs absolutely nothing when you put it on. The headphone just rests on your head with just enough clamp to keep them from slipping and sliding around unlike the 3d wing design and incredibly loose fit of the Audio technica AD700. No, really. You can compare with some other top tier headphones in terms of comfort, and the MA900 will still put them to absolute shame.

Is it PERFECT? No. The headband could be just a little more plush to make it truly disappear on the top of the head. The pads can stand to also be more plush, to both keep from flattening out, and to keep the ears from lightly touching the drivers. That being said, the driver cover is of similar cloth to the pads and headband and won't crush your ears, so it won't offend the ears compared to something like the premium Beyerdynamic DT770/880/990 which have a tendency on crushing ear due to their shallow pads. Every once in awhile you'll have the urge to readjust the MA900. That's about the only real gripe I personally have.

Despite these very minor annoyances, there's arguably no real competition from all the headphones I have worn (and I have worn many). The MA900 truly stands alone as the king of full size headphone comfort.


Design Issues:

The MA900 has a few things that I feel are worth noting. When adjusting the size, I STRONGLY advise on actually holding the headphone on the exposed rubber pieces where they extend, and adjust the headphone by holding the solid arm piece with the other hand and pulling. Don't just yank the cups down while they're on your head, and don't adjust the size by holding the headband and pulling down on the cups or the arm piece as you can cause the rubber pieces to slip out of the headband and expose the wires. Protect the rubber piece between the headband and the cups by holding that specific piece tightly when adjusting. Trust me on this.

Also, as previously mentioned, the cable doesn't have a proper strain relief, so make sure not to yank on it from either the entry point to the headphone itself or the headphone jack. With proper care, the MA900 shouldn't have any build quality issues despite it's thin, light design. If you're somewhat abusive to your headphones, then perhaps the MA900 is not for you. However, I don't see an issue coming up with tossing them around. Just be careful with the cable itself.

Finally, this may not really be an issue, but I need to mention that the MA900 is sensitive to ear placement. It's possible to reduce bass and make the MA900 slightly more holographic sounding by placing your ears closer to the rear side of the pads. I personally recommend wearing the MA900 in it's natural position, with the ears as close to the center as possible to ensure you get the intended sound quality. The one benefit I find by wearing the MA900 with the ears close to the rear, is that your ears will breathe a little more, and won't touch the driver cover.


Accessories:

The MA900 comes with a 6.3mm gold plated adapter attached to the plug. It also comes with a rather gaudy looking gold carrying pouch. The pouch doesn't even have a Sony label on it, but at least it's functional. I would've preferred a black, cloth pouch like those that came with the Sony XB500.


Isolation/Leakage:

I'll make this easy for all of you. If you're looking for isolation and noise control, skip every open ear headphone, especially ones as open as the MA900. The MA900 by design is incredibly open, to the point of having a large gaping void between the pads and the driver housing. This means that the sound of the MA900 will leak out as much as if you're holding the MA900 in your hands with the cups spread apart. If holding a pair of headphones in the air with the cups spread apart is too loud for you (at your listening level), then the MA900 won't help matters.


Sound:

The Sony MA900 has comfort and price in the bag. Does the sound hold up? Absolutely. The Sony is what I consider a true all-rounder, doing many things well, with no glaring flaws other than a slightly polite treble response. It won't be the best at any one thing, but do all manner of things well. Tonally warm, well balanced, with some fantastic imaging, and a large, spacious soundstage. The MA900 in all honesty, shares a lot with the HD650 with some key differences, which I'll touch upon in the comparison section.


Bass:

The MA900's bass is actually quite impressive. For an open dynamic headphone with such a large leakage point in the hole between the pads and the drivers, the bass is surprisingly pretty competent and hits with convincing authority. It hits hard when a song calls for it, and is well in line with the mids every other time. Note that there is a noticeable sub bass roll off, so don't expect a massive low end rumble from these. Mid bass is more than plentiful, and could even be seen as ever so slightly emphasized. More bass than the AKG Q701, and about on par with the K702 65th Anniversary, despite the latter having more linearity in the bass that extends and reaches lower. Feed the MA900 some music that asks for bass, and the MA900 won't disappoint for anyone looking for good, balanced bass. Bassheads need not apply.


Mids:

This is without a doubt the star of the MA900's show, and it's greatest strength. The MA900's warm, organic tonality is thanks mostly in part due to it's realistic voicing, and fleshed out mid section. Thankfully, the mids don't come out as shouty or over-emphasized due to the mid bass staying relatively on par with the mids, giving the MA900 a linear curve that doesn't particularly add emphasis to anything. The large, spacious soundstage places some distance between you and the vocals in the virtual space, so the MA900's mids aren't as intimate as something like the LCD2, HD650, and K702 Anniversary. It is however still the area in sound that brings to the most attention to the MA900, with zero mid recession. If you love natural sounding, clear vocals, the MA900 is a safe bet. One of the best mid sections out of all the headphones I've owned.


Treble:

If anything can be considered to be the weakest area of the MA900 and the least likely to grab attention when it comes to the sound signature, it would definitely be the treble region. The MA900's treble is not the final word on energy, sparkle, and aggression. However, it's definitely not veiled or overly rolled off. The MA900's treble is on the smooth side, inoffensive, and almost entirely non-fatiguing. It doesn't extend as well as brighter, more treble oriented headphones, sacrificing some hyper detail and upper clarity for overall listening comfort. If you want a headphone to analyzing hyper details, the MA900 is not it. However, if you're looking for a headphone that won't shatter your ears with sibilance, and instead give you a pleasant amount of non-fatiguing treble, the MA900 will be right up your alley.


Soundstage:

Following in the footsteps of my HP-800 review, the MA900 follows suit as a tonally warm headphone with smooth treble still manages to have a large, spacious soundstage. The smoother presentation causes instruments and sound effects to sound thicker, but a little less defined, and less cohesive in the virtual space (like the K702 Anniversary). However, this is in comparison to the more analytically inclined headphones like the AD700, K702, and other, more treble oriented headphones like the DT990.


Positioning:

This shouldn't come as a surprise due to the fantastic imaging, large, spacious soundstage, and very balanced sound: the MA900 has some fantastic positional cues. While the positional cues aren't as tightly defined as other headphones like the K701 and AD700, placement is spread apart, and easy to locate in the virtual space. Like the K702 Anniversary, the notes are on the thicker side, just robbing positional cues of just a little bit of breathing room, but when there is already so much available virtual space, it's nothing truly to be concerned about. The MA900 makes for a fantastic competitive gaming headphone, with no sacrifices made to it's immersion for fun oriented gaming. What that means is that if you're looking for a headphone that will easily locate enemies, or other sound effects, yet do great with other forms of gaming, the MA900 makes a compelling argument for your hard earned money.


Clarity:

Thanks to the MA900's fantastic mids, and overall linear response, there really is nothing that blocks the vast majority of details. The treble's smooth and inoffensive nature may bottleneck and mask the upper range's last bit of extension and hyper detail, but as we all should know by now, mids are where the vast majority of sound is, and the MA900 has plenty of it. There is plenty of clarity otherwise. The MA900 may not be the most refined and technically proficient headphone out there, but for most uses, clarity is not going to be a problem.

For gaming, there's not going to be anything that performs well above the MA900 in terms of sound-whoring, unless you want to sacrifice the realistic tone, immersion, and pleasant signature for pure analytical use.


Amping:

The MA900 has a very interesting design, in that there is an impedance compensator, allowing the MA900 to be used with basically any standard headphone amp without having to worry about the output impedance altering the MA900's frequency response curve. The MA900 is actually quite efficient, and incredibly sensitive to boot. A portable amp would be basically all the MA900 needs. For gaming purposes, nothing in addition to something like the mixamp would be necessary.


Value:

At $180, the Sony MDR-MA900 represents one of the greatest values I've seen for ANY headphone. There is so much it does right, with very few caveats, which really aren't even based off it's fantastic sound. In my opinion, the MA900 stands uncontested in the under $200 price bracket. You get a serious headphone for your money.


Comparisons:

Vs the HD650:

As mentioned earlier, the Sony MA900 bears a lot of tonal similarity to the Sennheiser HD650. More than any other headphone I've used to date. Similar tonality, mid bass hump, excellent mids, and smooth treble. However, the MA900 is faster, the soundstage reaches further out, with more space between instruments. The MA900 is also not reliant on amping the way the HD650 is, although the HD650 scales up more, and is definitely more refined, fuller in body, and more detailed overall. However, you can buy two MA900s before one HD650, with some money left over, and the MA900 is arguably close enough to the HD650 in sound signature with some strengths over the HD650 that warrant an additional glance if you're looking to buy either one.

The key differences is that the HD650 is considerably more intimate and upfront in presentation. Slower, more seductive, with a fuller figure, and more refined. It is classy, mature, and confident in it's abilities to produce sound, without overdoing any one thing. It also knows how to handle the responsibility of power. The MA900 is like the younger, inexperienced sibling, attempting to outclass the former with a large sense of space and quicker speed, but doesn't exactly know what to do with more power. It doesn't quite reach the maturity, level of refinement, or detail retrieval of the HD650.

Ultimately, the MA900 has a few wins over the HD650: soundstage, speed, comfort, price, and amping requirements, while also being considerably better for gaming use. However, the HD650 wins in the even more organic quality and body of sound, with more potential, and sexier approach to sound in general. If basing your purchase between the two purely on sound quality, the HD650 has more potential. However, the MA900 puts up a great fight for a fraction of the cost, with a better chance at impressing gamers in both positional accuracy and long term wearing comfort.


Vs the mid-fi favorites:

The MA900 is not a giant killer. The long-standing, popular mid-fi favorites like the DT880/990, K702, HD650 and even the newcomers like the Fidelio X1, Mad Dogs and HE-400 all are technically more proficient and refined overall. However, they are all a little to a lot more expensive, require more power, have frequency response bumps and dips (i.e. too much bass or treble), and may be more situational in use. The AKG K702 65th Anniversary (and I assume the K712 Pro as well) are about the only one/s that I can safely say is/are the next evolutionary step up from the MA900 in terms of sound quality, and general all-around versatility/use for music, movies, AND gaming. The MA900 however, is superior in almost every single way to the Sennheiser HD558/598/PC360. It essentially makes the current 5xx line of Sennheisers obsolete.


Final Impressions:

Great sound, truly amazing comfort, minimal amping requirement, and relatively affordable price. It also does most forms of music genres, and all forms of gaming very well. What more can you ask for? The build quality and incredibly light weight doesn't inspire the most confidence in terms of durability, but with some care, I don't see the build being problematic. The Sony MA900 will now be my baseline and point of reference for all headphones in this price range and onward. If you have around $200 and want a well balanced, warm, and non-fatiguing all rounder, this is the first and possibly last headphone you should look at. The MA900 is quite possibly the easiest headphone to recommend for anyone that isn't a pure basshead or in need of isolation.


Final Scores...

Fun: 8 (Great. Warm, immersive, and balanced bass that kicks with authority when asked for. The sub bass is a weakness in terms of immersion, but when so much content focuses on mid bass, it really isn't a detriment to the MA900's fun factor.)

Competitive: 9 (Amazing. The large soundstage, paired with great balance, and fantastic positional cues make the MA900 a truly sublime, competitive gaming headphone. The positional cues aren't as incredibly well defined as some of the more analytical or treble emphasized headphones, but overall, there is little to complain about for competitive use.)

Comfort: 9.5 (Amazing. Despite the minor annoyances of the thin headband padding and ear pads, and your ears touching the driver covers, there just isn't much out there that stack up to the MA900 in terms of long wearing comfort. Incredibly light and heatproof make the MA900 an absolute comfort legend.)
post #5238 of 5436
I need help!

About a year ago I purchased a pair of Elite Sony PS3 headphones. In my bedroom I have a 47" TV, PS3 and Dish Network DVR. The cups on the headphones both broke and Sony wouldn't cover them. But my problem with them was that everything I listened to was at the headphones max volume because almost everything was WAY too quiet.

They have a USB plug that goes into the PS3. This sends the signal to the headphones. On the USB plug is also a mini RCA jack for another source, like the output from the television. Other than PS3 games which were a decent level, I needed to turn the volume up to max just to get a low level from Streaming movies, many DVD's and Blu-rays and Dish DVR were very weak in volume even at max. Plus it seemed every program I watched had a different level, but all very low.

My question is: How is the volume on the Sennheiser RS 170's or 180's or other brands? I can't understand why none of these wireless Headphone companies ever list the type of amplification within the headphones, so one knows how loud they will go. I don't have any store near me to try the better ones out.

What I thought I would do is get an RCA splitter and input the PS3 into one input and the Dish Network DVR into another and then output to the RS 170 or 180. Any information you might have would really help. I want really good volume this next time around, especially for the prices these headphones are.

I know this is a gaming headphone thread but after looking through many pages, it seemed the best place to ask. I need wireless because I can't have chords in the bedroom. Thank you.
post #5239 of 5436
Also in regard to bluetooth voice chat quality on the Turtle Beaches...does this improve if you step up to the TB sets that support A2DP (i.e. Tango, XP500, XP510, PX5, PX51, etc.)? The mid range sets like XP400 look like they only support mono. I guess this accounts for why there are those complaints about the bluetooth chat sounding "tinny" and "robotic"? Do people have the same experience on PS3? Or is the bad voice quality a combination of the mono output and Xbox 360 XBA adapter?
post #5240 of 5436
Senn PC 360's are at $170 on Amazon. I'm looking for a headset. Should I jump on this?
post #5241 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylor422 View Post

Senn PC 360's are at $170 on Amazon. I'm looking for a headset. Should I jump on this?

Do you have a MixAmp or DSS? if so then I would say yes, they're one of the best gaming headsets out there.
post #5242 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClownBaby MC View Post

Do you have a MixAmp or DSS? if so then I would say yes, they're one of the best gaming headsets out there.

I may be looking at console use in the future, but as far as I am aware non-Microsoft headsets with the next generation consoles are still an uncertainty. So, for now, I'm looking at PC use only. I could do with a sound card, though. Recommendations welcome.
post #5243 of 5436
Microsoft has confirmed they will be making an adapter for headsets to allow voice chat. As far as just having the game sounds, it would work just as before, by plugging an optical cable from the MixAmp into the back of the Xbox One.
post #5244 of 5436
Another question about the turtle beach sets. I noticed that on some of the newer models (Tango, X-ray, Seven series, XP510) that the detachable boom mic has a silver attachment.



Does this have any functional value or is it just aesthetics? A few reviews I read stated that this actually lets you know which side of the mic is supposed to be directed toward your face so that you get the best chat clarity? Is that correct? If so, how are you supposed to tell which is the correct side when using the older mics for like the XP400, etc?
post #5245 of 5436
Will answer my own questions since this thread seems dead lol
Quote:
Originally Posted by henhowc View Post

So... any try both the turtle beach ear force x-rays and xp400? I know sound and build wise they should be almost exactly the same. Looks like the two main (non-aesthetic) differences are:

breathable mesh ear cushions vs. Memory Foam/pleather Ear Cushions and headband
wired xbox chat via talkback cable vs. bluetooth wireless xbox chat

I currently have the xp400 but the bluetooth wireless chat quality seems to be a worse than the stock 360 wired headset. My friends mentioned that my voice sounded weird (robotic) and that I was cutting out more than usual :\

Also interested to know if the memory foam and leather have actually increased comfort levels any?

Picked up a pair of X-rays off Amazon for comparison. Pleather on the ear cups is definitely softer on the ears but headband was whatevers. Headset also seemed less tight around the jaw. I'm not sure if its the actual memory foam/pleather that is making the headset slightly more comfortable than the xp400 but it felt like less of a clamp around my head.

Wired talkback cable sounds so much better than the bluetooth. Voices are much clearer. Both the bluetooth xba and talkback cable seem kind of finicky though. I had issues with both where I had trouble hearing people in lobbies or in my party as voices would cut out. When I had voice chat output through my surround sound system I could hear voice chat just fine.

x-ray had a loose power button so i think that is the one going back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by henhowc View Post

Another question about the turtle beach sets. I noticed that on some of the newer models (Tango, X-ray, Seven series, XP510) that the detachable boom mic has a silver attachment.



Does this have any functional value or is it just aesthetics? A few reviews I read stated that this actually lets you know which side of the mic is supposed to be directed toward your face so that you get the best chat clarity? Is that correct? If so, how are you supposed to tell which is the correct side when using the older mics for like the XP400, etc?

Didn't see or hear any difference between the mics. Voice chat quality is basically determined by whether you decide to go wired or bluetooth.
post #5246 of 5436
Will answer my own questions in case anyone else was stumbles upon this thread with similar questions. This thread seems dead lol
Quote:
Originally Posted by henhowc View Post

So... any try both the turtle beach ear force x-rays and xp400? I know sound and build wise they should be almost exactly the same. Looks like the two main (non-aesthetic) differences are:

breathable mesh ear cushions vs. Memory Foam/pleather Ear Cushions and headband
wired xbox chat via talkback cable vs. bluetooth wireless xbox chat

I currently have the xp400 but the bluetooth wireless chat quality seems to be a worse than the stock 360 wired headset. My friends mentioned that my voice sounded weird (robotic) and that I was cutting out more than usual :\

Also interested to know if the memory foam and leather have actually increased comfort levels any?

Picked up a pair of X-rays off Amazon for comparison. Pleather is definitely softer on the ears. Headset also seemed less tight. So I'm not sure if its the actual memory foam/pleather that is making the headset slightly more comfortable than the xp400. Wired talkback cable sounds so much better than the bluetooth. Voices are also much clearer and you can tell the difference in quality. Both the bluetooth xba and talkback cable seem kind of finnicky though. I had issues with both where I had trouble hearing people in lobbies or in my party as voices would cut out. Note that it wasn't the game audio cutting out, just the voice chat audio. When I had voice chat output through my surround sound system I could hear voice chat just fine. Based on Amazon and various reviews on the net, there seem to be potential quality control issues with the cable and bluetooth adapter.

x-ray had a loose power button so i think that is the one going back. may try and get another set.
Quote:
Originally Posted by henhowc View Post

Another question about the turtle beach sets. I noticed that on some of the newer models (Tango, X-ray, Seven series, XP510) that the detachable boom mic has a silver attachment.



Does this have any functional value or is it just aesthetics? A few reviews I read stated that this actually lets you know which side of the mic is supposed to be directed toward your face so that you get the best chat clarity? Is that correct? If so, how are you supposed to tell which is the correct side when using the older mics for like the XP400, etc?

Didn't see or hear any difference between the mics. Voice chat quality is basically determined by whether you decide to go wired or bluetooth.
post #5247 of 5436
As an aside, using an optical splitter worked perfectly. I no longer need to swap cables when switching between my ps3 and xbox 360. One caveat is you can't have both consoles on at the same time. Which makes sense of course. If for some reason you need that you'll need to get an optical switch.
post #5248 of 5436
Turtle Beach X-rays are on sale again at Amazon for $99. If you are willing to risk skipping out on the 1 year warranty there are also open boxes for sale through Amazon for $69/75 depending on condition.
post #5249 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven Crimson View Post

The first page here is quite outdated (almost 2 years since last update), but I can't get into my old account to update.

Hey Shin, it's been awhile. I guess the new account didn't help either... Is your avatar Pascal from Tales of Graces?

I'm looking for a pair of headphones for gaming. I would prefer an open design for the comfort factor, but it isn't a deal breaker. Since Sharp failed to include volume control on their headphone jack, I will need an Amp if I go wired. I don't listen to anything at high volume so all I would need is something that offers volume control and doesn't mess up the audio. The Sennheiser HD518 is my current front runner for a wired solution.

I've also looked into Sennheiser's wireless lineup, and the RS120 caught my eye with it's open design, but I would be worried about RF interference. The RS160 is digital, but has a closed design. (My current headphones are closed and I don't really care for them, but they are cheap, so that is probably a factor in my dislike of closed designs right now...) I would think that digital would offer a higher quality signal, but I haven't done much research into it.

Any help or recommendations would be appreciated.
Edited by PENDRAG0ON - 9/17/13 at 10:14pm
post #5250 of 5436
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

Hey Shin, it's been awhile. I guess the new account didn't help either... Is your avatar Pascal from Tales of Graces?

I'm looking for a pair of headphones for gaming. I would prefer an open design for the comfort factor, but it isn't a deal breaker. Since Sharp failed to include volume control on their headphone jack, I will need an Amp if I go wired. I don't listen to anything at high volume so all I would need is something that offers volume control and doesn't mess up the audio. The Sennheiser HD518 is my current front runner for a wired solution.

I've also looked into Sennheiser's wireless lineup, and the RS120 caught my eye with it's open design, but I would be worried about RF interference. The RS160 is digital, but has a closed design. (My current headphones are closed and I don't really care for them, but they are cheap, so that is probably a factor in my dislike of closed designs right now...) I would think that digital would offer a higher quality signal, but I haven't done much research into it.

Any help or recommendations would be appreciated.

Sorry for the inexcusably late reply. I frequent head-fi, not avs. Here is my gaming guide

What's your budget? What kind of sound are you looking for? Does it HAVE to have an inline volume control? Most headphones with in line volume controls are going to be closed and portable oriented.

My fave at the moment (no volume control) is the Sony MA900. It's relatively inexpensive (on ebay it can be found for around $140, and it usually goes for $180-200 elsewhere), incredibly lightweight and comfortable, with a very balanced, warm, all round multi purpose type sound. It does great for gaming as well. My review is on this very page.
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