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Bluffs Cinema Construction Thread - a Dennis/Pro Theater DIY build - Page 2

post #31 of 176
Thread Starter 
Nah, I cant imagine - not any more than the drywall compound would come off the walls between the drywall seams.

The walls are stud walls spaced away from the foundation walls - no clips and channel. This weekend the sprayfoam is being applied, and then I will build the stud walls spaced away from it by 1/2 or so (after trimming down the high spots on the sprayfoam first).
post #32 of 176
Ah room inside a room approach.


P.S. More photos dammit
post #33 of 176
Thread Starter 
I've got nothing else left to photograph After the foam goes on this saturday I'll be able to do subfloor,framing,and HVAC & electrical prep in short work (Hopefully)
post #34 of 176
Is there a drain in that concrete pit ?
post #35 of 176
Why not just use shallow depth surface mount boxes? Installed, after the drywall is up. Shim with plywood. You could get away with one hole to seal for all the electrical to the room. You might need to watch the infill rules with shallow boxes.
post #36 of 176
Thread Starter 
The lowered area does have a floor drain, tied into a perimeter weeping tile underneath the new slab to relieve any inward water pressure on the walls of the lowered area. This weeping tile drains to the sump pit at the front of the room.

The sump pump will be tucked neatly behind the screen for now, however I do have long term plans to relocate the pit to the other side of the house and run a new drain pipe that is low enough to service the lowered area by gravity alone. However, too many $$$ for now!

In the meantime the pump is very quiet and only needs to run once per day, so I set it to run at 8am - hopefully I wont be watching any movies at that time

Tedd, I certainly could run the wires through conduit on this side of the drywall, but for only ~6 outlets and ~6 lights I'm tempted just to wire up the room normally and surface mount the boxes, because it gives me (and future homeowners) flexibility to change things up down the road. Either way its better for soundproofing than standard outlets.
post #37 of 176
You can use a plastic vapour barrier box mounted to the wood studs.
They don't have any holes around the box (like the metal boxes)
You can caulk around where the wire enters the box.
They also have a foam seal around the lip of the box for which the drywall will rest against.

http://www.google.ca/images?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1596&bih=675&q=vapour+barrier+eletrical+boxes&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=[/IMG]
post #38 of 176
Thread Starter 
Is it still best practise to install a dimmed electrical outlet inside the soffit for rope lighting? (or for low voltage potlights)
post #39 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp View Post

Is it still best practise to install a dimmed electrical outlet inside the soffit for rope lighting? (or for low voltage potlights)

Not sure about best practice, but my inspector was fine with it as long as I had an access panel to get to it if needed. But he seems to be a pretty easy going inspector (I had a different guy before who was more of a PITA, but they swapped up territories I guess).
post #40 of 176
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I see lutron sells a customized socket for this application but its really nothing more than a silly molded faceplate with their own custom plug - no thanks!
post #41 of 176
Thread Starter 
Sprayfoam got done this weekend. I also started laying the subfloor product, called Superseal all-in-one. This product is only 1/8" profile and they claim you can install carpet directly overtop without a plywood subfloor. This is a big help for limited headroom.

I may use a higher profile product for the lowered area simply because headroom is less of an issue, and any potential water infiltration would naturally tend to pool there - I like to say this lowered area may actually save the rest of my basement in the future from a flood!

post #42 of 176
Thread Starter 
I have been going back and forth about running a new set of ceiling joists, or using clips and channel. The biggest problem with the new set of ceiling joists are the perpendicular joists you can see in the photo - this is framing for the fireplace directly above.

I think I've decided to do a combination - run as many ceiling joists as possible and use clips and channel for that small area. One of the nice things about this will be that the new joists (even just a few of them) will provide bracing for the long walls to help prevent them from potentially bowing. I still anticipate using RSIC clips to anchor the stud walls to the existing joists, although I am considering the idea of using OSB sheets for the first layer (instead of drywall) and doing away with the RSIC clips entirely.
post #43 of 176
Thread Starter 
The other nice thing about new joists is they are strong enough to hang my screen (and potentially my projector) from. I wouldn't trust hanging from clips and channel. Ted showed me ways to do it (either use RSIC clips or a cable isolator product he has) to mount plywood instead of drywall for the inner layer, but I think having actual joists is just a cleaner solution.

Are people using 2x6's or 2x8's for the floating joists?
post #44 of 176
Thread Starter 
OSB sheeting is lower mass than drywall (500kg/m3 vs 750kg/m3) - has anyone used MDF instead (which is 700kg/m3)? Apparently it is structurally rated if the walls are 16" OC.
post #45 of 176
I prefer floating joists to clips and channel if space allows. That's what I did. The density of MDF is great, but I'm not personally crazy about the screw-holding ability of MDF vs. Plywood or OSB
post #46 of 176
Hey Kromkamp - looking good! I have been looking at that Superseal all-in-one as well as I have limited headroom too. Do you have any more impressions of it since you installed it?

And I'm in the same boat too on the Quest products - Dennis designed my space with wall treatments very similar to yours (Q-Flectors and PerfSorbers). I haven't gotten as far as pricing yet, but I'm expecting they're not very close to free.
post #47 of 176
Is there a structural issue going on here?
LL
post #48 of 176
Thread Starter 
Ted, its true that MDF will bite screws less than OSB, but still more than drywall. Although if you work the numbers 3/4" OSB is about the same as 1/2" MDF/drywall.

Another possibility - Magnesium Oxide board? Its 25% denser, mold-proof, insect-proof, inflammable, and a green product. Its also rated to be used as structural sheathing. I don't know the costing or availability but I'm going to do some research.

Not much to say about the superseal for now - its certainly priced right ($200 to cover 325 sqft). I'm going to test it with some carpet fragments and a good quality underpad some time soon to see how it feels without a plywood underlay.
post #49 of 176
Thread Starter 
Tedd I'll double check tonight but I'm reasonably certain the triple-joist is attached to double-joists on either side - it's all the original construction, it hasn't been modified. I should check to see if there are joist hangers there though - if not I'll add some.

Those joists are structured that way specifically to carry more load (the load of the fireplace above) so I'm sure what has been done there did not weaken the structure. Also my structural engineer had no concerns (nor did the building inspector).
post #50 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp View Post

Ted, its true that MDF will bite screws less than OSB, but still more than drywall. Although if you work the numbers 3/4" OSB is about the same as 1/2" MDF/drywall.

Another possibility - Magnesium Oxide board? Its 25% denser, mold-proof, insect-proof, inflammable, and a green product. Its also rated to be used as structural sheathing. I don't know the costing or availability but I'm going to do some research.

That's a nice dense board. Like Hardie board. Neither will recess a screw head, though. Why not just use standard 5/8" drywall and go with a third sheet?
post #51 of 176
Thread Starter 
Regarding the Quest products, my main concern is that I would really prefer to use acoustic cotton instead of fiberglass for the sound treatments. I'm just not that comfortable with fiberglass only behind fabric, if the fabric ever tears or comes loose. Bit of an irrational concern I admit but I'm still working towards that goal.

Dennis has given me some replacement ideas for the Q-sorber and Q-flector, and we are discussing the use of RPG BAD panels instead of the perf-sorber (which I should be able to replace the fiberglass with cotton behind).
post #52 of 176
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

That's a nice dense board. Like Hardie board. Neither will recess a screw head, though. Why not just use standard 5/8" drywall and go with a third sheet?

The idea here is to use a structural sheathing layer (OSD,plywood,MDF,or MgO board) and room within room construction so I can potentially avoid using the RSIC clips for stability of the framing. the MgO board offers all those other advantages so it would be preferable if its available and priced acceptably.

This is why I can't tell you how many clips I need to order from you yet

Cheers
post #53 of 176
Maybe keep it simple / economical and use a sheet of standard OSB followed by double 5/8".
post #54 of 176
Thread Starter 
Oh, if I go with OSB I would just go 3/4" , GG, single 5/8" firecode drywall I think.

Is plywood less desirable because of potential voids in the inner plys? or just cost? Ply can be significantly denser than OSB depending on the species used if you have a good grade.
post #55 of 176
Generally cost drives people to OSB. I prefer plywood.
post #56 of 176
Quote:


And I'm in the same boat too on the Quest products - Dennis designed my space with wall treatments very similar to yours (Q-Flectors and PerfSorbers). I haven't gotten as far as pricing yet, but I'm expecting they're not very close to free.

The Quest Products do not price compete with your traditional fiberglass under fabric panels ... largely because they are not simply fiberglass under fabric. They are engineered products (patent pending in many cases). Quest does sell fiberglass under fabric, fabric and fabric track at competitive products but their primary lines are their engineered laminated or molded products (Q-Sorber, Q-Flector, Q-Fractor, Perf-Sorber, Q-Fusor, for example).
post #57 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

The Quest Products do not price compete with your traditional fiberglass under fabric panels ... largely because they are not simply fiberglass under fabric. They are engineered products (patent pending in many cases). Quest does sell fiberglass under fabric, fabric and fabric track at competitive products but their primary lines are their engineered laminated or molded products (Q-Sorber, Q-Flector, Q-Fractor, Perf-Sorber, Q-Fusor, for example).

Thanks for commenting, Dennis. I hope you don't think I was insinuating that Quest's products are too expensive or not better than fiberglass etc. I don't really have experience with any panels at this point, so I'm the furthest thing from a decent evaluator of anything in that realm. I'm just looking forward to seeing what those Quest products can do in my theater!
post #58 of 176
Where do you get Superseal and how much per square foot if you don't mind me asking?
post #59 of 176
YESSS!! Finally a question by thewalkinator that I can answer!!

Here you go

http://www.superseal.ca/contactretailer-us.cfm
post #60 of 176
Since that link appears to be broken, you can buy online by clicking on the yellow shopping cart on this page:
http://www.superseal.ca/all_in_one_subfloor.html
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