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The Esquire Theater!! Construction Begins... - Page 6

post #151 of 1757
Tony I found that picture doing a google search years back. I believe it was done by a Maryland based custom install group and I've actually seen a couple other very similar designs. My only criticism of that door is that the padding on the door is not a true tufted design which takes a little more craftsmanship. I had the front of my bar tufted but I hired a company that does restaurant booth maintenance to do it.
post #152 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post


If possible, I'd like to use rope lighting above the door, sort of like CurtisG's Cinema Paradiso

Wrong builder. CurtisG has very nice Dennis E designed space but not the Cinema Paradiso
post #153 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Ah, yes you're right BIG - my mistake. I can't find the link to his site right now, but the cinema paradiso looks amazing. Very very nice.

I made some more progress today on the insulation...moved lots of alarm wires out of the way today (no fun) - I hope to be completely finished with insulation tomorrow...and I'm hoping to have the framing lumber delivered early this week.
post #154 of 1757
Just a word of caution on framing lumber and cold weather construction. If you have a very dry house (Humidity) keep the lumber tightly stacked and it doesn't hurt to throw a waterproof tarp over it so that it doesn't start warping and twisting before you can get it locked into a wall. If you are using pressure treated pine for the bottom plates they will be the worst offenders and you need them straight for straight walls. As I worked on my basement I tended to buy just what I could use each week but I had a pick-up. I literally had to roll the PT pine in a tarp if I wasn't going to use it for a week. Obviously if you have a humidifier crank it up.
post #155 of 1757
Now that I have paint on the walls, I can see a few "bumps" that were caused from these warping boards. I thought I'd get away with it and didn't. Low light theater environments were a god send for this overmatched carpenter wanna be...
post #156 of 1757
Yes after framing a basement and having it up for a few weeks it is a good idea to take a 4 ft or longer straight edge and walk the walls. Holding it up at the middle of the wall lay it across 3+ studs at a time. I think in my entire basement I ended up replacing about 6 studs that had a mind of their own. I also used a handheld electric planer to nudge some back into the proper alignment. You can also attach shims to the low ones bringing them forward.

You will never get it perfect, but you don't want to see big bulges in the walls.
post #157 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Ok thank you BIG - that's great info that I wasn't aware of at all. I will crank up the humidifier this week...

One elementary question about bottom/top plates...I am planning to buy the longest boards I can get - is using the fewest boards possible to cover the span the way to go? For example, I have one wall that's about 22'. I'm assuming I'm best off going with 16' and 8' bottom plates, rather than using three 8' boards. Is that correct?

Thanks guys...
post #158 of 1757
Yes the longer you go on the top and bottom plates the less joining together of different sections you will need to do. Of course if you are tipping the walls up you might need some help.
post #159 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatBrat View Post
After studying your pictures of the gas and water lines, here's an idea. Cut notches into the joists, using a circular saw (like for cutting out holes for door knobs, only smaller), then push and fasten the pipes up into these notches. Check code first to see if you can do this.

I've installed and removed my own natural gas lines, and I had no prior experience, so it's not all that hard. Just use thread sealing tape and get them real tight.
Cutting large holes/notches in structure is a TERRIBLE idea. NEVER do this.

You can reinforce the area by laminating but if you dont know to do this properly then don't play around with structure...

I repeat never debilitate or weaken structure. the above suggestion could prove fatal. and no it is not allowed in code.

Matt
post #160 of 1757
i doubt you will find perfectly straight 2x4s these days (unless you mill your own true 2x4s).

a good trick to making sure your walls are true is to make sure the crown of all the boards is on the same side. this can really help your walls line up and look really true.

to find the crown just look down the length of the board and find which side bends outwards, thats the crown. most all boards will have this and typically boards from a batch will have a similar crown (coming from the same tree and milling time).

Matt
post #161 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Hey Matt - thanks for the info! I agree that notching out joists is very dangerous and definitely wouldn't proceed down that path. Unfortunately though, I did have to remove 5 joists in order to re-route some HVAC ductwork... KIDDING!

But seriously, for anyone who comes across this in the future and who has as little construction experience as I had when I started reading here, consult someone who really really knows their stuff before touching anything structural. Better yet, leave it to a pro. Potentially disastrous consequences await if you botch this one...

And Matt - one question...once I find the crowned side of all the studs, should that side face the drywall or the unfinished space?

Thanks!
post #162 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_Vai_rules View Post

Cutting large holes/notches in structure is a TERRIBLE idea. NEVER do this.

You can reinforce the area by laminating but if you dont know to do this properly then don't play around with structure...

I repeat never debilitate or weaken structure. the above suggestion could prove fatal. and no it is not allowed in code.
Matt

As I was removing old drywall in the ceiling of a bathroom I'm remodeling, I noticed this humongous notch that someone had taken out of 3 joists, just so a ceiling fan and exhaust for it could be installed in the ceiling. Much better idea would have been to install it in the wall instead.

post #163 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatBrat View Post

As I was removing old drywall in the ceiling of a bathroom I'm remodeling, I noticed this humongous notch that someone had taken out of 3 joists, just so a ceiling fan and exhaust for it could be installed in the ceiling. Much better idea would have been to install it in the wall instead.

That's just scary Are those really joists or three sistered together for a beam? If it's a beam with joists connecting, I'd be putting a pole or two underneath for support.
Looks like older timber and an even older perspective on safe notching techniques.
post #164 of 1757
I won't hijack this thread any further to talk about my problems. I have my own thread here called "CatBrat HT build". I just got a camera, and am working on clearing out the "room" first, before taking any more pictures.
post #165 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post

Hey Matt - thanks for the info! I agree that notching out joists is very dangerous and definitely wouldn't proceed down that path. Unfortunately though, I did have to remove 5 joists in order to re-route some HVAC ductwork... KIDDING!

But seriously, for anyone who comes across this in the future and who has as little construction experience as I had when I started reading here, consult someone who really really knows their stuff before touching anything structural. Better yet, leave it to a pro. Potentially disastrous consequences await if you botch this one...

And Matt - one question...once I find the crowned side of all the studs, should that side face the drywall or the unfinished space?

Thanks!

agree about consulting with a professional when it comes to making changes to structure.

As for the crown it shouldn't really matter which side the crowns face, for a single sided wall i face the crown out into the room. otherwise it doesnt matter if both sides are being faced with drywall, the main point is to keep the humps on one side and the valleys on the other so everything stays in 'true'.

Matt
post #166 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatBrat View Post

As I was removing old drywall in the ceiling of a bathroom I'm remodeling, I noticed this humongous notch that someone had taken out of 3 joists, just so a ceiling fan and exhaust for it could be installed in the ceiling. Much better idea would have been to install it in the wall instead.


if you havent already i would support that area immediately. you will likely have to laminate in a couple 2x8s to regain the lost structural integrity from those those notches.

that is incredibly dangerous and any serious load above that point could cause a collapse.


Matt
post #167 of 1757
I just saw something like that on "Holmes on Homes". This was an air duct installed into a "soon to be" finished basement. The installer cut a notch through "ALL" the joists... The house was already starting to cave in on itself. YIKES!!! Some people should just work at McDonalds.
post #168 of 1757
Funny thing is, it's been this way for the past 40-60 years. House is 60 years old and this bathroom has always been there. I've lived here the past 11 years. If it's stood the test this long, I really doubt that it will be a problem. After removing more drywall, I may try and install another joist in that spot, though, without removing any of these.
post #169 of 1757
You can walk over a 2x3 oriented the wrong way. It just depends on the span and the loading. It is not good to notch a joist in general unless you know what you are doing....and even then it is never code. A lot of the joists and beams are spec'ed for deflection and not strength. They will end up bending a LOT before they break.
post #170 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Argh...the last few steps of the insulating process are taking me forever...I'm working on insulating the top of the forms now...very tight fit between the top of the concrete and the joists, so I'm having to use 1" XPS instead of 2", and I'm probably going a bit overboard with the Great Stuff. And I think there are seven rim joists left to do as well. I'm hoping to get all of this done tonight, but I have to travel for a meeting tomorrow...long drive + early meeting + snow on roads = a very early morning!

Plus, my helper said she needed the night off last night...something about being over-worked, but I'm not buying it...
post #171 of 1757
Thread Starter 
OK so I'm getting ready to order framing lumber and I have a question...16" or 24" OC framing?

I spoke with our resident guru Ted White, who said that either is fine. Others have mentioned that 24" OC may help with low frequency isolation because the number of contact points between drywall and framing is reduced. 24" would also result in marginal cost savings, as I will need slightly less lumber. I guess that makes me lean toward 24".

I'm just trying to decide whether I have forgotten any practical considerations...does anyone have thoughts on this? Dennis' design in my space calls for 14 of the Quest Q-Flectors and Perf-Sorbers and they are to be exactly 2' wide...I have no idea how heavy these are, whether I will need to grab two studs for each of them, etc.

If you have thoughts on this or have tackled this issue previously, would love to hear your thoughts...

Thanks!
post #172 of 1757
You might consider installing the initial layer or part of the initial layer as OSB rather than drywall. This gives you a constant nail base and OSB is cheap like drywall.

24" framing offers an advantage over 16" OC framing in coupled single stud walls. Once decoupled, the spacing is moot.
post #173 of 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post

Dennis' design in my space calls for 14 of the Quest Q-Flectors and Perf-Sorbers and they are to be exactly 2' wide...I have no idea how heavy these are, whether I will need to grab two studs for each of them, etc.

Have you thought about asking Dennis (or Quest for that matter) to see how those panels are mounted to the walls, how much they weigh, etc? I'd think they could answer your question pretty quickly.

Also, I assume the plans you have include the panel placement on the walls...you could add a few extra studs to guarantee you have a secure mounting surface when you go to hang the panels. Mounting plywood between studs where you know panels will go is another option.

EDIT: Ted beat me too it...

Looking good so far, keep up the good work!
post #174 of 1757
Did you buy insulation for the walls? I was going to do 24" OC studs but I couldn't find the insulation readily. So I switched to 15" or 16" OC (steel studs - if you're using 2x4 make them about an inch smaller than the insulation width).
post #175 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies all!! And yes, I guess I should just ask Dennis/Quest about the weight of the panels...

Thanks HDvids...I'm really close to finished with insulation and can't wait to get started on framing so I can actually see some real progress!!

And cutter - nope, haven't bought insulation yet...although Andreas lives near me and found the 24" stuff locally...although he said they had a pretty short supply.

I guess I'm thinking I'm just going to go with 16"...seems like there's just less potential for hassle that way...I'm using a lot of elipses today...
post #176 of 1757
As cute as your helper is, I'd consider letting her go.
post #177 of 1757
They have plenty of the 24" wide insulation...it was the hat channel I wasn't sure how much they had left.
post #178 of 1757
Thread Starter 
Yeah, and she started acting like that even before I mentioned carrying 95 sheets of drywall down the L-shaped staircase to the basement!


I just talked to Quest...he said weight is about 30lbs. per panel. They apparently also come with some sort of mounting hardware...


Thanks Andreas...will check on that!
post #179 of 1757
You asked earlier about using multiple pieces for top and bottom plates for a 24 ft wall. Your idea was a 16 and an 8. I would use two 12s.
post #180 of 1757
Thread Starter 
I got some new toys in the mail last night from Ted and the Soundproofing Company...cool!

Now I just have to get to the stage where I can use them...I only need about 2-3 more hours work before I can call the insulation complete, but holiday parties and work have been getting in the way lately (darn obligations!). Feels like I have been talking about it for a year, but I am finally going to get lumber and hat channel on Saturday. I'm also going to try to squeeze in a day off next week so I can get the majority of the framing done by the end of the weekend.

I also need to track down some Tapcon's and some of that foam on a roll for under the PT lumber...



A bunch of GG, SilenSeal, DC-04 clips, whisper clips, putty pads, and speedload dispenser. I still need to get the door seals, and will probably need a few more clips for backer boxes etc. That speedload dispenser is pretty legit! I think I'll put it next to my bed when I'm done so I can conk an intruder over the head with it if necessary!

Everything arrived on time and looks great. Thanks again Ted!
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