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The Esquire Theater!! Construction Begins... - Page 8

post #211 of 1756
Thread Starter 
Hey Walkinator - yea, I agree 100% that a framing nailer is the way to go...but unfortunately, I don't have one and don't feel like I can justify the purchase just for this project as I'll probably rarely if ever need it again.

However, I think I have a good solution for all of the issues (wood/metal, screws/nails, timeline/schedule, tomato/tomahhto): everyone gather your screws, nails, metal, wood, compressors, nailers, screw guns, and come to my house for a good old-fashioned build off! Sure, I'll end up with one metal wall, one wood one, some screws, some nails, etc., but I'm fine with a bit of a hodgepodge! I'll buy the beer...

EDIT: However, if people want to start convincing me that I need to buy a nailer/compressor etc., I'm all ears . I have been thinking that it's ridiculous to pay $100 every time the sprinkler guy comes to shut off my system...my parents live near me too and pay the same, so that's $200/year. Grrr. OK I need a nailer haha. Although, the GAF (and most other reasonable non-HT people) would probably say I should buy a couch and coffee table for the empty living room before a nailer. Or a dining room table for the empty dining room...Oh well, they're all crazy...
post #212 of 1756
Compressors are excellent. They have all sorts of uses.

But how about this? Rent the nailer and/or compressor? I needed a "sawsall" and it was $17 for 4 hours. I think a 24 hour period was $24. That was the big daddy of saws. I bet they have similar deals on compressors and nailers (you'll have to buy the nails) so you'll only need to fork out a fraction of the purchase price.
post #213 of 1756
PS - I wouldn't be affraid of steel. I had never used it before. It's way easy.
post #214 of 1756
A 3 gallon pancake air compressor would be fine, I got my nailer gun from Harbor Freight for only like $70 when it was on sale and it works great, never missed a fire. I also got my nails from there, if you google, you can find single item 20% off printable coupon. I think there is a store in Albany. Renting is fine only if you can get job done quickly, I rented a floor nailer for a week (I have the compressor already) for like $200 I don't remember exactly but I wasn't able to get it done in a week, so have to rent couple of more days so it ended up pretty much same as just buying one.
post #215 of 1756
I started framing my basement Saturday morning and am about half done. If you bust your butt, you could get it done in 10 days...but not with screws.

Here is what I bought for my job...has worked great for me so far.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Air-...3-pc-Kit/H8233

Has a one year warranty so I figured I could finish my framing within the first year. I will seldom use the nailers after I finish the basement so I figured something inexpensive would be the perfect fit in my situation. Plus, I have had very good luck with Grizzly tools in the past.
post #216 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post

EDIT: However, if people want to start convincing me that I need to buy a nailer/compressor etc., I'm all ears . I have been thinking that it's ridiculous to pay $100 every time the sprinkler guy comes to shut off my system...my parents live near me too and pay the same, so that's $200/year. Grrr. OK I need a nailer haha. Although, the GAF (and most other reasonable non-HT people) would probably say I should buy a couch and coffee table for the empty living room before a nailer. Or a dining room table for the empty dining room...Oh well, they're all crazy...

The sprinkler system is the exact reason we purchased our compressor to begin with. It's one of those things that you use and put in the garage. Then a week goes by and you have a problem, and you realize, "Holy crap! I can just use the compressor for this!". We use it so often it's always pressurized. Get one that doesn't require oil though, that'll be one less thing you have to worry about.
post #217 of 1756
Every time I think about nailing guns, I think about the movie "The Island" where a girl nails this big guys hand to a door frame with a nailing gun.
post #218 of 1756
Thread Starter 
Hmmm ok now I'm interested Could one of those pancake compressors handle shutting off my sprinkler system? I don't know much of anything about compressors...I was shocked to see how inexpensive some are (~$60?). And it looks like HD has a framing nailer/compressor package for $199...
post #219 of 1756
The pancake ones are not the best as far as output. You might want to check out Harbor Freight too. They have some great deals, especially considering you won't be using your compressor or nailer every day.
post #220 of 1756
Ben, we all love to watch people here spend their money on new toys, and I'm sure you'd find many uses for a new compressor. If you're tight on the budget though, don't forget that classic song....

"If I had a hammer
I'd hammer in the morning
I'd hammer in the evening
All over this land"

Back in the day when I was doing summer jobs, I was on a rough framing crew. Of course, I never got to use the air nailers as those were reserved for the experienced productive crew members. I got to walk the walls 2 stories up stacking/nailing roof trusses with a HAMMER.

Matter of fact, I built my 16'x40' deck and my backyard barn with a HAMMER!

That's the way is was back then, and we LOVED IT

That being said, buying a compressor and framing nailer for my basement project was one of my better moves
post #221 of 1756
Thread Starter 
Hmmm yes thanks for keeping me in check fotto! I almost left work early to go pick one up .

I'm on the fence about the compressor/nailer. If I was planning for fabric all the way around the room, I could get a stapler too and it would be a done deal, but my plans just call for a bunch of perf-sorbers and q-flectors. Although, i'm not 100% sold yet on that design - in many situations, I like the look of full fabric walls better than hanging acoustic panels...we'll see.

However, I will say that I'm going to go to HD tonight to look at nailers etc., and that rarely ends with me leaving empty-handed. Stay tuned...
post #222 of 1756
Thread Starter 
Ok so I didn't make it to HD last night to look at compressors and nailers - my office holiday party intervened. I am hoping to make that trip this evening instead. I think one of my co-workers put the final nail in the coffin today and I have decided to bite the bullet and get one. (pun intended )

However, I did order all of the framing lumber today...being delivered tomorrow morning. It's going to be a busy weekend!


EDIT: Just called HD...$65/day to rent compressor and nailer, plus tax. Definitely better off buying than renting.
post #223 of 1756
How much is that same compressor/nailer combo?
post #224 of 1756
Thread Starter 
$199! That seems like a steal to me.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

EDIT: Argh! I just realized it says online only! Crap! Will have to come up with another solution...may try harbor freight tonight.
post #225 of 1756
just be aware that if you are building the wall on the ground you will need to measure the length of each vertical stud where it will be placed, especially with old houses because the joists may have sagged or warped or the floor lifted or just poor quality with true/leveling. I was helping a friend redo his basement and he had built the framing for a wall before i got there but he only measured twice, once on each end, and used those measurements as an average, suffice to say that the wall was too tall and also too short, had to rip it apart and start fresh.


Matt
post #226 of 1756
Thread Starter 



Apparently not only available online . They had 3 of these in the store. Can't type right now...need to go find something to nail!
post #227 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_Vai_rules View Post

just be aware that if you are building the wall on the ground you will need to measure the length of each vertical stud where it will be placed, especially with old houses because the joists may have sagged or warped or the floor lifted or just poor quality with true/leveling.

Actually you measure in multiple locations and make the whole wall a little less than the smallest measurement. If there is a large variance the wall shouldn't be built flat, instead each stud should be fitted and toe nailed in place.
post #228 of 1756
With DC-04s, he'll make the top of the wall at least 1" below the joists. He needs to make them low enough so that he can still secure the second layer of wall drywall to the top plate after the first layer of ceiling drywall is up. I had to shorten one wall after realizing this.
post #229 of 1756
Be careful with that new toy. I can tell you from experience that once you pull the trigger the nail may or may not go where you are planning. It can even curl and come right back at you.

It may also misfire.
post #230 of 1756
Thread Starter 
What did you guys get me into here??

I will admit that because I have almost no experience with power tools, I was a little scared of this contraption before I even got it out of the store. Add in BIG's warning and the warning attached to the hose, and I'm officially freaked out and want to run the other direction:

"This product contains one or more chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands after use."

Luckily, it apparently only causes these issues in California. I live in NY, so I should be all set.

Anyway, I was having a hard time finding the right nails last night. I need 21 degree plastic collated round head nails, and all the galvanized nails in the store said "not for use with PT lumber." Anyone have thoughts on this??

Thanks!
post #231 of 1756
I love seeing new toys! Whenever I buy a new tool I feel like I used to when I was a kid and got a new toy...but even better!! Like any tool just use common sense and work safely and you will be fine. I can certainly vouch for the nails wanting to do their own thing though sometimes so keep your free hand away from where you're nailing and you shouldn't need to worry about impaling it any time soon

I had to make a decision several years ago when I first started getting into DIY stuff whether to go with nails or screws so I knew what tools I needed to buy. I chose screws and did a fence, deck, and now a basement with all screws. Of course I got myself the best toy..I mean tool for the job. A nice 18V Impact Driver was called for. It's the same one Mike Holmes uses on all his shows. I've had it for over 5 years and the thing rocks! I love using this tool but there is no doubt that screws in general take much longer but this tool at least lets me go as fast as possible with them. Thankfully I'm not in a rush so I will stick with the screws.

Good luck with the new tools and the framing! I'm looking forward to seeing what you get done this weekend!
post #232 of 1756
I don't think you have to worry about the (P)ressure (T)reated warning. You're not making a deck
post #233 of 1756
Were there any hot dipped galvanized nails available? Those should work ok for pt. If the nails aren't rated for pt then they will get eaten away by it and eventually fail but who knows how long that would take. They may outlast you or maybe not. If it were me I would use what's stated to be acceptable for pt use.
post #234 of 1756
He's not using PT lumber is he?
post #235 of 1756
yeah for the sole plates I believe.
post #236 of 1756
Oh... shouldn't used steel :-p

He's doing that because he's scared of moisture? I still wouldn't worry about it. I wouldn't have even bothered using PT wood there. But then, mine likely would have rotted in 20 years. (or his room needs way more than PT lumber).
post #237 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post

What did you guys get me into here??

I will admit that because I have almost no experience with power tools, I was a little scared of this contraption before I even got it out of the store. Add in BIG's warning and the warning attached to the hose, and I'm officially freaked out and want to run the other direction:

"This product contains one or more chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands after use."

Luckily, it apparently only causes these issues in California. I live in NY, so I should be all set.

Anyway, I was having a hard time finding the right nails last night. I need 21 degree plastic collated round head nails, and all the galvanized nails in the store said "not for use with PT lumber." Anyone have thoughts on this??

Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post


Can't type right now...need to go find something to nail!

Sounds like your getting in over your head Ben....I'd suggest just nailing your GF, it just may be more rewarding than building some stupid old walls.

Just kidding...you'll do fine, just keep your digits away from where the nail is driving into. I read up on pressure treated wood and not using galvanized nails, and ended up going back over all my walls and toe-nailing them all at the bottom plates with galvanized. I just used standard galvanized nails that fit my Hitachi framing nailer. If they're defined as hot dipped great. It's all about the thickness of the galvanization with the new PT wood.
post #238 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by fotto View Post

Sounds like your getting in over your head Ben....I'd suggest just nailing your GF, it just may be more rewarding than building some stupid old walls.

LOL, this is got be the line of the month!
post #239 of 1756
Thread Starter 
Ok I returned the nailer and am scrapping the HT project. I'm gonna stick to nailing the GF . I think that the GAF on that project will be much higher. Fotto - hilarious...definitely the line of the month!!!!

I'm thinking of a whole bunch of witty retorts to that one, but I think this thread could go south very quickly given my twisted mind ! Although I'm sure I'm no different than the rest of you creeps

My lumber and hat channel was delivered this morning and I got it all downstairs through the basement window with my Mom's help Thanks Mom!! (She's a super tough retired lady!) It was about 80 2x4x8's and some other miscellaneous longer boards/PT stuff.

And yep, I got PT lumber for the bottom plates. I'm making up a shopping list and think I'll go to Lowes tonight and see if they have different nail options than HD. HD didn't seem to have much, but I was in a rush last night and didn't search very hard...
post #240 of 1756
Ben the channel looks correct?
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