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connecting power conditioner to power strip? - Page 2

post #31 of 35
It takes all the noise and frequencies out of the incoming power. Have you ever used a non shielded cable of any sort? VGA or rca or whatever? Lets take vga for example. If you use a non shielded vga cable, chances are that your image on your desktop monitor will be moving around or bouncing if there is any type of interference. In the line of work I am in, we have to use line filters in some applications. I retrofit and work on cnc machines.
post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post

How?



It goes to zero 120 times per second, but that's by design, it's not dirty.



These components operate on DC, not AC.

All the components are AC power unless there is part of them that use dc power in which they have a bridge rectifier to convert the AC to DC. That means that it still uses the AC power coming in so I dont know where you were going with that?
post #33 of 35
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It takes all the noise and frequencies out of the incoming power.

The incoming 'power' is a 60Hz (or 50Hz) Sin wave, does it remove this frequency as well?

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I retrofit and work on cnc machines.

I'm an EE, I work in broadcasting, but internet credentials are meaningless.

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Have you ever used a non shielded cable of any sort? VGA or rca or whatever? Lets take vga for example. If you use a non shielded vga cable, chances are that your image on your desktop monitor will be moving around or bouncing if there is any type of interference

I'm familiar with shielded cable, I understand why coax is constructed the way it is. You don't quite understand the concept of shielding, and it doesn't actually relate to "power conditioners" in this case.

The "power conditioner" pictured in this thread has a bunch of inductors and capacitors in it, simple passive components forming notch, bandpass, high or low pass filters. Somewhat meaningless when you understand how a DC power supply 'converts' AC to DC.

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All the components are AC power unless there is part of them that use dc power in which they have a bridge rectifier to convert the AC to DC.

No, the input to the power supply is AC. I'm not going to explain linear or SMPS here, but the rest of the circuit operates on various DC voltages.

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That means that it still uses the AC power coming in so I dont know where you were going with that?

Agreed
post #34 of 35
Actually I do understand shielding and when ever I need to make an encoder cable, for example, I use the shield to filter noise. This relates to the power conditioner by filtering out excessive fq.

I also understand how a power supply converts AC to DC and I see your point on your argument there, but how do you know that all AV equipment has an AC to DC power supply and uses all DC power?
post #35 of 35
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but how do you know that all AV equipment has an AC to DC power supply and uses all DC power?

Seriously? Experience, common sense.
Beside the motor in a turntable, what AV equipment that you know of, would use raw AC?

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I use the shield to filter noise.

It can be used for that, of course electromagnetic interference isn't stopped by a shield. Differential signalling is used in high interference areas and over long distances.
Telephone lines carry small signals for long distances next to high voltage lines, and they're not shielded.

Quote:


This relates to the power conditioner by filtering out excessive fq.

fq?
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