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'Falling Skies' on TNT HD - Page 2

post #31 of 2147
Yeah he said it starts right in the middle of it. They tell you what happened but they don't build up and show it. The attack has mostly taken place at that point.

I think that's a great approach because otherwise people would complain that it took too long to get to that point, it's moving too slow etc etc.

I mean imagine if BSG starts out and doesn't have the Cylon attack in the mini....etc
post #32 of 2147
Premiers this Sunday, June 19, 2011 at 8:00 PM CST.

I'm looking forward to it.
post #33 of 2147
I believe it's 2000 CDT but who's counting.
post #34 of 2147
I guess I'll tune in, but get SOOOO tired of "post apocalyptic" stuff. There has been no sci-fi of recent memory where the future is better than the present. Everything is doom and gloom. I much prefer the ST NG stuff with a little hope a positive feeling for the future.
post #35 of 2147
There seems to be a bunch of recent similar themed movies and this TV mini-series about an alien invasion of earth and a group of resistance fighters. Similar recent themed movies include: Skyline, Battle:Los Angeles
post #36 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post

I guess I'll tune in, but get SOOOO tired of "post apocalyptic" stuff. There has been no sci-fi of recent memory where the future is better than the present. Everything is doom and gloom. I much prefer the ST NG stuff with a little hope a positive feeling for the future.

Not to be rude, but I'm not getting tired of it.
This year, I've started to get into survival supplies. Bug Out Bags and Medical Bags, etc.

Ha.
post #37 of 2147
After all, DEC 2012 is fast approaching ..
post #38 of 2147
Can't locate the thread here now, but recall another Spielberg-supervised SF mini-series (TNT?) that was generally well received. It starred a young Dakota Fanning who had some kind of 'link' to visiting flying-saucer folks. Recall commenting he should supervise more TV series. -- John
post #39 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post

I guess I'll tune in, but get SOOOO tired of "post apocalyptic" stuff. There has been no sci-fi of recent memory where the future is better than the present. Everything is doom and gloom. I much prefer the ST NG stuff with a little hope a positive feeling for the future.

That's pretty much been the theme of sci fi from the get go in probably 80% + .. we apparently like to see the gloom and doom, end of mankind as we know it, etc .. similar to our insatiable desire to watch a celebrity go down in flames ..

There but for the grace of ..

After all, in the direction the real world is headed ..
post #40 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason View Post

Can't locate the thread here now, but recall another Spielberg-supervised SF mini-series (TNT?) that was generally well received. It starred a young Dakota Fanning who had some kind of 'link' to visiting flying-saucer folks. Recall commenting he should supervise more TV series. -- John

Taken
post #41 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamieva View Post

Taken

Great mini-series!!!
post #42 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post

I guess I'll tune in, but get SOOOO tired of "post apocalyptic" stuff. There has been no sci-fi of recent memory where the future is better than the present. Everything is doom and gloom. I much prefer the ST NG stuff with a little hope a positive feeling for the future.

We need something where we (from Earth) go to a distant world, feign "we come in peace" to an apparently friendly population, then drop a 50-meg nuke on one of their major cities and announce "Come in peace? We lied, we're here to take over, strip your planet bare of resources and sell your populace into slavery - both regular and sexual". Give up now, you cannot win.

I'm not talking Starship Troopers type Earth, I'm talking regular Earth where we decide that we've had enough of this "being friendly" stuff, we want to go out there and kick other worlds butts, just because we can.

If you're going to be evil, let's BE EVIL! (You know, like the alternate Star Trek universe from "Mirror, Mirror" and subsequent episodes).
post #43 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post

We need something where we...go to a distant world, feign "we come in peace" to an apparently friendly population, then ...announce "Come in peace? We lied, we're here to take over, strip your planet bare of resources and sell your populace into slavery - both regular and sexual". Give up now, you cannot win.

I think what you are looking for isn't science fiction, it's any book about Hernán Cortés.
post #44 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post

I guess I'll tune in, but get SOOOO tired of "post apocalyptic" stuff. There has been no sci-fi of recent memory where the future is better than the present. Everything is doom and gloom. I much prefer the ST NG stuff with a little hope a positive feeling for the future.

The problem is, if you look at all the crap that seems to get worse every year, it makes the ST stuff seem more and more like fairy tales.

Further, it seems like we're getting every further from deep space exploration all the time.

The problem I have with this type of concept is that it's far more likely we'll destroy ourselves long before some alien race comes along and does it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamieva View Post

Taken

Excellent mini-series. The kid who grew up getting abducted every decade or so got a bit annoying, but overall, an excellent effort for basic cable.

Dakota Fanning's character was particularly compelling - a huge 180 verses her completely grating and annoying character in "War of the Worlds". It's amazing how the same two people can come together on two similar projects and have them be so far apart.
post #45 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

The problem is, if you look at all the crap that seems to get worse every year, it makes the ST stuff seem more and more like fairy tales.

Further, it seems like we're getting every further from deep space exploration all the time.

The problem I have with this type of concept is that it's far more likely we'll destroy ourselves long before some alien race comes along and does it.


Excellent mini-series. The kid who grew up getting abducted every decade or so got a bit annoying, but overall, an excellent effort for basic cable.

Dakota Fanning's character was particularly compelling - a huge 180 verses her completely grating and annoying character in "War of the Worlds". It's amazing how the same two people can come together on two similar projects and have them be so far apart.

I'm building bug out bags because Earth's natural disasters seem to get worse every year. I would like to be prepared to survive when a major hurricane (flood, tornado, etc.) levels my city.
post #46 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

I'm building bug out bags because Earth's natural disasters seem to get worse every year. I would like to be prepared to survive when a major hurricane (flood, tornado, etc.) levels my city.

I'm gonna build a big, giant ark. Unlike the Titanic, this boat will actually be unsinkable since the polar icecaps will probably be melted by the time I need it.

I actually plan on building it out of the same plastic as they use for storage bins. After watching the first season of "Breaking Bad", I know that stuff won't be eaten by the acid in the water...
post #47 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post


Dakota Fanning's character was particularly compelling - a huge 180 verses her completely grating and annoying character in "War of the Worlds". It's amazing how the same two people can come together on two similar projects and have them be so far apart.

It's amazing how a director can ask an actor to be what they envision the character to be and the actor does it just like the director asks.
post #48 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post
We need something where we (from Earth) go to a distant world, feign "we come in peace" to an apparently friendly population, then drop a 50-meg nuke on one of their major cities and announce "Come in peace? We lied, we're here to take over, strip your planet bare of resources and sell your populace into slavery - both regular and sexual". Give up now, you cannot win.
Wasn't that the basic theme of Avatar?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post
After all, DEC 2012 is fast approaching ..
Jeez and I thought it was Oct. 21. Now I'll have to Christmas shop.
post #49 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post
I'm building bug out bags because Earth's natural disasters seem to get worse every year. I would like to be prepared to survive when a major hurricane (flood, tornado, etc.) levels my city.
Not if but when .. ??
post #50 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73shark View Post

Jeez and I thought it was Oct. 21. Now I'll have to Christmas shop.
Just depends on who you listen to .. the whacky padre or the Mayans ..
post #51 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobby94928 View Post
It's amazing how a director can ask an actor to be what they envision the character to be and the actor does it just like the director asks.
...and it's amazing neither one even considers how piss poor an idea it is. That's a terrible excuse.

Of course, it's that same lack of questioning something that get's so much crap greenlit these days. I'm pretty sure every one of those room sessions has someone in there thinking, "this idea kind of sucks..." but he's so afraid of getting canned he doesn't say anything.

The thing is, it's the director's job to get the best performance out of an actor he can, whether it's the one he originally envisioned or not. Sometimes what works on the page doesn't work on set. This was one of those times.

Steven is one of the best directors of children in the business and has been able to help them convey every emotion from happiness all the way to fear and anxiety. He's also endlessly adaptable to what works and what doesn't on the fly.

This was a poor effort at making her a sympathetic character. It made me want he to be zapped into ash so Cruise could pick up an interesting hitchhiker to replace her.

If not for her freakouts, the brother storyline and the Tim Robbins side story, it would have been a wonderful remake effort, possibly equaling the original. Of course, he also should have come up with something original for the ending. That one may have worked in the original version, but it felt dated and highly implausible based on the different circumstances of the arrival. The thing is, it started off so well with some great parts in the middle. Then it was like Tim Burton and Frank Darabont stepped in to rewrite a third of the movie.
post #52 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post
I'm building bug out bags because Earth's natural disasters seem to get worse every year. I would like to be prepared to survive when a major hurricane (flood, tornado, etc.) levels my city.
Yeah, being prepared for natural disasters is good planning, however, when the big comet comes and scorches the earth I'll sit on my front porch with a drink and sunglasses and wait to get incinerated. No use surviving a month or two when the results will be the same.
post #53 of 2147
haha. Great replies on this page.
post #54 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

Not if but when .. ??

I heard the New Madrid fault had a four point something last week. Any shaking over your way?
post #55 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

I'm building bug out bags because Earth's natural disasters seem to get worse every year.

I just put a 30 gallon water tank in my garage for potential earthquake related water outages.
post #56 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamieva View Post

They tell you what happened but they don't build up and show it. The attack has mostly taken place at that point.

I think that's a great approach because otherwise people would complain that it took too long to get to that point, it's moving too slow etc etc.

From the sounds of it I wouldn't be surprised if they didn't show it because the creators haven't really figured out what they want yet and they can put that stuff in as flashbacks.

Normally you would expect a canon to be written for something like this but it sounds like they are being pretty loose because either they haven't thought it through or they are trying not to write themselves into a corner they don't know how to get out of.

For a SF show that level of vague doesn't fill me with confidence. It sounds like they are making it up as they go and if they are concerned about the detail-specific audience not having those details thought out already might be a mistake.

But at least it solves the old Lost criticism by admitting they don't really know what the middle of the story is.
SFX: Do you have the long-range goals planned out for the series, like taking the planet back from the aliens?
We know the destination but we don't know all the roads we need to take to get there. Rather than writing ourselves into a corner with a mythology that's real specific, we're teasing it out so we don't commit to anything we don't really mean at the moment. It's taking shape as we are going and that's the most daunting thing about doing science fiction; it's an audience that plays closer attention to detail than just about any other. You have to make sure you don't dishonor that level of engagement by giving short shrift to the details because that's what they are interested in.
post #57 of 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73shark View Post

I heard the New Madrid fault had a four point something last week. Any shaking over your way?



I had a few folks tell me they felt it, I myself did not ..

http://www.lewrockwell.com/rep/new-madrid-fault.html
post #58 of 2147
TNT's 'Falling Skies' a solid alien invasion thriller
Friday, June 17, 2011 by Alan S.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitfix View Post

I used to go to a restaurant that served this chicken dish that arrived at your table engulfed in blue flames. The first time I saw it, my eyes grew three sizes and I thought, "I like chicken, I like fire, I should get that." When I actually tasted it, the dish was pretty mediocre, but that didn't stop me from trying it several more times, nor from ordering food-on-fire dishes at other places. The idea seemed so great that my mind simply couldn't accept that the actuality of it was only occasionally good.

TNT's "Falling Skies" (Sunday at 9 p.m. on TNT) an alien invasion drama produced by Steven Spielberg, seemed like an ideal candidate to be a flaming chicken dish. It's combination that once upon a time would have seemed fantastic, but where my expectations have been lowered by too many mediocre Spielberg TV projects that seemed like he lent his name and little else, and by too many terrible alien invasion series like "V" and "The Event."

But it turns out that "Falling Skies" is that rare time where the chicken tastes as good as it looks. It's a sci-fi series with a heavy focus on character and story (but also with good action when it's called for), and a Spielberg TV show where you can see his fingerprints in the work.

The debut episode smartly skips over the invasion entirely. We've seen too many of them - usually in movies with much higher budgets than even a Spielberg-backed cable drama has - for it to be of any interest. Instead, we see the invasion as depicted in a series of kids' crayon drawings, and the basic premise - that the aliens came, wiped out our cities and military, and started abducting teenagers to use as brainwashed slave labor, so that "Now moms and dads have to fight" - described by those kids. It's much more effective, and chilling, and nicely sets up the family dynamic that's at the heart of the show (just as it's often at the heart of Spielberg's sci-fi epics). Between that introduction and the action sequence that follows it, it's as strong an initial impression as any show of this type has made on me in a long time.

Noah Wyle (sporting the controversial beard he wore on occasion in his "ER" days) plays Tom Mason, a Boston history professor pressed into combat duty when the aliens - a bunch of creepy-looking insect/spider hybrids that people take to calling "skitters" - kill his wife and abduct his middle son. As the series begins, he's latched onto a makeshift version of the 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, which is a mixture of aging (if not retired) military veterans like Will Patton's Weaver, willing civilians like Tom, and even some kids. Tom's oldest son Hal (Drew Roy), a high school lacrosse player before the invasion, often functions as his unit's second-in-command, and their unit also features a 13-year-old named Jimmy who's good with a rifle in his hands.

Tom's goals are at once simple - stay alive, protect Hal and youngest son Matt (Maxim Knight), and find abducted son Ben (Connor Jessup) - and complicated, in that he, unlike Weaver, believes there's a way to take the planet back from the skitters.

"History is full of inferior forces causing so much trouble the invading force leaves," Tom lectures his skeptical troops at one point.

(It's an occasionally tiresome character quirk that he's often applying lessons from the Revolutionary War, or earlier, to their current dilemma, but the show at least has a sense of humor about it. When his historical examples fail to inspire anybody, he reminds them of the 2004 Red Sox, and they all get on board.)

Though the premiere's first hour was written by "Saving Private Ryan" and "The Patriot" screenwriter Robert Rodat, and the second by "The Pacific" veteran (and "Justified" showrunner) Graham Yost, the man actually in charge of the first season is Mark Verheiden from "Battlestar Galactica." And "Falling Skies" has some obvious "BSG" overtones, specifically in how it follows a small, badly equipped band of humans on the run from aliens who wiped out most of their race, and in how it dwells on tensions between the military and civilian survivors, here represented primarily by Moon Bloodgood as pediatrician Anne Glass, whose husband and son died in the invasion. There's even a 9/11-style memorial wall of photos of the missing and dead, just like the one the Galactica crew erected.

But even more than subject matter, "Falling Skies" is reminiscent of early "BSG" in its grounded storytelling and characterization. This is a show that understands that fantastic stories and fancy visual effects don't mean a lick if the people within them don't actually seem like people.

Where the characters on "V," "The Event," "FlashForward," et al remained stuck somewhere between archetype and cardboard cut-out, most of the key players on "Falling Skies" seem like flesh-and-blood human beings. They're none of them incredibly complex - Wyle isn't playing the sci-fi version of Don Draper - but they have flaws and quirks and aspirations, even within this horrible post-apocalyptic landscape. Hal is a cocky teenager, but he isn't The Cocky Teenager as Plot Device; he makes mistakes and argues with his father sometimes, but he's also usually useful and isn't constantly stumbling into trouble to cause conflict in that week's episode.

"Falling Skies" is pulp fiction, but it's very effective pulp fiction. The performances for the most part hover in the range of "solid," with Wyle the only castmember who consistently gets to show big emotions, and he's as excellent at the heart-on-sleeve stuff here as he was when he played John Carter. Bloodgood is also strong when she gets a chance to; she's done a lot of sci-fi over the years ("Daybreak," "Journeyman," "Terminator: Salvation") and more often than not isn't asked to do anything but look stunning and be mysterious, but here she's quite good at showing Anne struggling to power through her grief and get through the day-to-day.

The stories tend to be straightforward but well-told: a series of missions that provide standalone stories each week while advancing the larger story of the humans learning how to fight the skitters.

Your mileage will likely vary on the regular doses of Spielberg-style sentiment, as most of the episodes feature at least one climactic scene where Tom and one of his sons try to briefly capture a feeling of normalcy (say, playing lacrosse). But that longing for a world that's been destroyed and may not be salvageable is a key part of what this show is about and what these characters are fighting for, and when you've lost so much, a chance to play lacrosse for a couple of minutes feels like everything.

"Falling Skies" is exactly what you'd expect it to be, only a very good example of it (and is at its best in Sunday's pilot), and an ideal summer series. For once, Spielberg and company got it right on the small screen.

FALLING SKIES
Sunday at 9PM ET/PT on TNT

http://tv.nytimes.com/2011/06/17/art...ref=television
post #59 of 2147
30 more minutes!!
post #60 of 2147
My best friend worked on this and told me not to get my hopes up. I am glad I didn't. This is average at best. Noah is just killing it for me and I usually like Will Patton, but he is getting on my nerves.
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