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Nick's Homebrew Bar and Entertainment Area - Page 23

post #661 of 1235
Thread Starter 
Tim, I had considered exhausting the rack to the outside, but it would have required me to cut through a block wall. Plus I was really worried about noise penetration. I am still looking at alternatives to drawing air through the soffit. Maybe to the air return? I don't know if that will work.

I don't know why the angle I used for the soffits is green. It came from the drywall supply house. Usually when I buy it there is no paint/color - just bare metal. I am amazed at how strong the structure is with the metal. The big plus is that it it takes very little space since it is so thin.
post #662 of 1235
Nice progress Nick, hopefully after Thanksgiving Thursday day off you'll have 3 days to get lots done.

I also see your post1 is nicely organized, looks good.
post #663 of 1235
Thread Starter 
Thanks Mike. I don't know how much time I will have next weekend. The wife seems to think I am going to be spending time with the family. I told her that is what Christmas is for. All other holidays are for working on the theater rolleyes.gif.
post #664 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas View Post

Tim, I had considered exhausting the rack to the outside, but it would have required me to cut through a block wall. Plus I was really worried about noise penetration. I am still looking at alternatives to drawing air through the soffit. Maybe to the air return? I don't know if that will work.
I don't know why the angle I used for the soffits is green. It came from the drywall supply house. Usually when I buy it there is no paint/color - just bare metal. I am amazed at how strong the structure is with the metal. The big plus is that it it takes very little space since it is so thin.

Thin.. and straight! I used wood for the little "cross-soffits" in my room and ended up using a planer to make them straight. Everything else in my basement except the screen wall is metal.

I could be thinking of another thread, but didn't we figure the CFMs for this room based on the equipment being exhausted separately? Or did you run the numbers with the extra BTU from the equipment?

Block walls aren't too bad.. A little time with a hand maul and a chisel and you can get through in a few minutes.

You could blow it into the return duct, but nothing says it won't come out the diffuser rather than going towards the AHU.

Tim
post #665 of 1235
Thread Starter 
I think we originally may have done the calculations without the equipment, but at some point I decided that may not be feasible. I agree with your concern on venting into the air return. If I don't do that, then the air will remain in the room anyway right? smile.gif. I still need to do some thinking on this one (quickly).

Friday I was thinking about cooling in the winter. Since I have everything zoned, I can cool the theater even when the rest of the house is calling for heat, but will the AC compressor turn on in the winter? How will I get cool air if it doesn't? Will air still circulate, or is the system going to shut down completely?
post #666 of 1235
If you're calling for cooling when the outside temp is <60 you will probably need a low ambient temperature kit. Also, as I found out, the Aprilaire controller will shut the condenser down if the plenum temp drop below a certain point. Remember the return air is being drawn from the entire house, so depending on how many CFMs the basement takes and what temp you keep the rest of the house at in the winter, it may or may not be an issue.

You can always use the Fan switch on the thermostat to circulate air without cooling.

Tim
post #667 of 1235
Thread Starter 
I got some more work done on the theater today. I finished adding cross-braces to the soffit. It is extremely strong now. I also ran the 2" conduit for the low voltage wiring.







I also installed my sub panel on the side of the rack closet. My plan is to have all of my lighting automated. As you come in the door, there will be a scene selection switch which will set all of the lights at the appropriate level based on the scene you select (watch movie, all on, all off, etc.). Because of this, I am putting the individual switches in the rear of the theater so that they re not a distraction. I hope that I rarely (if ever) have to use the individual switches.



I also went back and updated my electrical plan. I determined the spacing for all of the lights, which will be together on a switch, etc. Now I can begin pulling the wiring for both electrical and low voltage.

QUESTION: What are others doing when they need to run romex down a wall to a switch or outlet?

Most of my wiring is going to be in the soffit or wiring closet, but I have two locations that I'm not sure how to handle yet:

  1. Behind the screen wall - I will have OC703 on the wall. This wire will be run behind the insulation. Does it need to be in a conduit? Can I run it down the wall since it will be covered (I'm guessing not).
  2. Scene switch at the door - This will be a single switch plate/box by the door. The wiring will be behind my acoustic panels. Same question, do the need to be in conduit if the wires are behind the panel?
post #668 of 1235
Meh, I wouldn't call it as long as the cable is 1-1/4" back from the face of the panels. I really don't think it's subject to physical damage back there.

You could sleeve it in a piece of EMT if you were worried about it. Just make sure you use an NM bushing at either end. Personally, I think that's overkill and unnecessary, which incidentally is the mantra of the Home Theater Builder.

Tim
post #669 of 1235
Thread Starter 
I was hoping to post that I ordered my Middle Atlantic rack tonight, but I'm not sure that I did. I spent the last several days digging through their site trying to figure out what I really need and finally pulled the trigger tonight after finding an excellent deal on the rack and accessories. When I placed the order, an error came up saying that a confirmation email was not able to be generated and to check with the sales department for the order status.

Bottom line is - I'm bummed because I don't know if my order has been placed or not. confused.gif I guess I will have to wait until tomorrow when they re-open to find out.

Regardless, my plan is to install a Middle Atlantic AX-SXR sliding/rotating rack. After trying to figure out how large of a rack I could fit in the space I have, I finally settled on a 34U rack. Hopefully it will fit all of my equipment (I guess it does for now since I don't have any). I now know what people mean when they say that the rack accessories will nickel and dime you. Even with a pretty significant discount, it still adds up fast.

I also found out from Roman that my chairs shipped today. Things are starting to fall into place.
post #670 of 1235
Thread Starter 
Today I got some good news, some bad news, and some great news.

The good news is that my order for the MA rack did in fact go through and will be processed right away. The rack will be drop shipped directly from MA in New Jersey.

The bad news is that while the description of the rack said it included the gasket and guides that fill the gap around the rack and help guide it in when sliding it back in, when they called to order the rack from MA they were informed that they no longer offer the special package that includes the gasket and guides pre-installed. This meant that the price of the rack was slightly less, but that I would need to purchase these accessories separately (in other words, more money).

The great news is that Yellow Freight called and my chairs are here. They will be delivered on Tuesday (first day I was available).

This evening I spent about an hour in the theater pulling wire for the lighting. Hope to continue the wiring this weekend after all of the family festivities are wrapped up.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!
post #671 of 1235
Thread Starter 
Weekend update. I am almost done with all of my electrical rough-in. I ran the wiring for the lighting in my soffits. I will have the following lights, each on their own switch/dimmer:

  1. Screen wash/front soffit (4 lights)
  2. Side soffits (4 lights on each side, 8 total)
  3. Rear soffit (2 lights)
  4. Behind screen (4 lights)
  5. Step lights (2 lights)
  6. Rope light



I also ran wiring for two outlets behind the screen as well as outlets that will be in the two side rear columns. I still need to install an outlet for the rope light and the projector.

I started running speaker wires, but I ran out of wire. I have more on order from Mono Price, but it won't be in until later this week.

I cut and installed the remaining pieces for the sides of the soffits. Unfortunately, I wasn't happy with the curved portion of the front soffit, so I removed the soffit sides so I could figure out where the problem was. It appears that one section of the curved piece needs to be bumped out slightly to make the curve smooth. I will mess with that this week.





Lastly, my MA rack requires that it be installed on a platform (it can't sit flat on the floor so that it can slide out). I built a raised platform in the bottom of the rack closet and cut the top for it. I need to trim one corner to finish it up. I want to have everything ready for when the rack arrives. I didn't want to finish the face and trim on the closet until I have the rack in hand so I can ensure everything will fit properly.

I am waiting on some parts to arrive, but I have plenty of little things to keep me busy while I am waiting. I need to clean up the wiring in the switch boxes, finish up the design of the bottom of the soffits as well as the tray for the rope light, install the last couple of outlets.

I also have plenty of planning/research to do. I need to start figuring exactly how much material I need for my acoustic treatments. I also am trying to finalize my speaker decision so that I can finish up the plans for the columns. I'm having a tough time deciding what the right speakers are.
post #672 of 1235
Great progress. I remember the point where I was waiting on some things to come together, but had all of the "little things" I needed to button up. Don't underestimate those little things, they can be quite time consuming.

On the speakers, what if anything have you considered? I can't remember if you have talked about this before (and after a big turkey dinner I'm feeling too lazy to go back and check) and what is your budget? When I was speaker hunting SVS, Klipsch, Ascend, Axiom, and Aperion were all on my short list. I finally decided on Ascend and never looked back, they are awesome. Then there is the sub, lots of choices there as well. Will make your head spin at times. No doubt.

Regards,

RTROSE
post #673 of 1235
Thread Starter 
RTROSE, you are right - the little things probably account for the most amount of time. I want to keep pushing forward, so I have started a list. It is amazing how many things we forget need to be done.

I have seriously been considering Salk speakers. After hearing them the first time, I couldn't believe he quality. They are pretty pricey. Doing the full 7.1 setup in the song series will definitely bust the budget. I was thinking it was a done deal, but I am starting to get cold feet. I have actually been reading a lot about DIY speakers. Not only can I save some money, I can get a speaker that will fit in a smaller column. That has been one of the things that has eliminated some of my speaker choices.

One one hand, I want to wait to make my speaker decision until after Christmas so my wallet can catch up with all of my recent purchases. On the other hand, I need to make a decision soon so I can get started on my columns.
post #674 of 1235
I know exactly how you feel. Yup the Salks are pretty pricey, I but I have not had the opportunity to listen to them, but they do get high marks from what I have read about them. I went way above my budget on speakers, but I figured that I would not have the opportunity to do this again so I figured one of the best places to spend the equipment money was on speakers/sub as the "other stuff" tends to be superseded yearly, speakers not so much.

I read some on DIY speakers, but as I was having a hard time finding time to "complete" my theater I thought taking on another build project might just be the infamous "last straw" in my build.

Hang in there. There is light at the end of the tunnel. wink.gif

Regards,

RTROSE
post #675 of 1235
Consider Triad?
post #676 of 1235
Triad or Procella are often the best choices for columns. Be careful on types used with regards to column widths.
post #677 of 1235
Excellent progress, Nick. Seems we are progressing at about the same pace. I too am beginning to consider the fabric order.

As for speakers, I'm going with Stentorians in the front and Sten II's for surround. I bought the drivers a while ago. The Pi's and SEOS projects are also favored. It's just time buddy.. I mean.. we all have so much spare time, right?

biggrin.gif

Tim
post #678 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas View Post


What are the green metal strips that you are using for your soffits? I assume these are to attach the drywall to?
post #679 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyk36 View Post

What are the green metal strips that you are using for your soffits? I assume these are to attach the drywall to?
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas 
I don't know why the angle I used for the soffits is green. It came from the drywall supply house. Usually when I buy it there is no paint/color - just bare metal. I am amazed at how strong the structure is with the metal. The big plus is that it it takes very little space since it is so thin.

It's just steel framing angle.. I had the same question biggrin.gif

Tim
post #680 of 1235
Thread Starter 
As Tim mentioned, it is just framing angle. It is screwed to the studs on the wall and through the hat track on the ceiling. I added a few laminating screws along the channel for strength. Just make sure you don't screw into a joist and defeat your soundproofing.
post #681 of 1235
Thread Starter 
My chairs arrived today!! I want to get them into the basement as soon as possible for storage, but unfortunately, moving these things is not really a one person job (maybe if I took them down in pieces). Hopefully I can get someone to help me cart them down this weekend so I can free up the garage again.





I also received my rack today. I ordered the 34U Middle Atlantic AX-SXR pull out rotating rack. It looks like I have plenty to keep me busy until my speaker wires arrive.



I started assembling it tonight. I am really impressed by the quality of this thing. After seeing it first hand, I have no regrets about spending the extra money. I can't wait to get it installed.







I still have lots to do, but it is a good start.
post #682 of 1235
Chairs are in pieces Nick, back's and bottom for pack density.
Open the boxes, easy to move yourself, I did it so can YOU! biggrin.gif

(and then the obligatory seat shot)
post #683 of 1235
Thread Starter 
I actually brought one in the house by taking in the separate pieces one at a time. I just had to try one out biggrin.gif. I think i will just do that with the rest. I'm just paranoid about getting them down the stairs. I need to open them up to inspect them anyway.
post #684 of 1235
Seat pics, seat pics, seat pics, seat pics.............OK I can be patient, no really I can. So now that you tried one out, what do you think?

Regards,

RTROSE
post #685 of 1235
Everything is looking great Nick. I too am awaiting the seat pics.

Keep up the good work!
post #686 of 1235
Thread Starter 
Here is a quick shot of one of the new chairs. Notice that I upgraded the fabric.

post #687 of 1235
Paint the legs black, good to go. LOL
post #688 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas View Post

Here is a quick shot of one of the new chairs. Notice that I upgraded the fabric.

So that's what happened to Cousin It...
post #689 of 1235
Thread Starter 
I felt bad about the phony chair photo, so here is the real thing. All eight of them:



Of course I didn't want to get them dirty, so I left them wrapped up wink.gif. I plan to open them up this weekend and get them all set up to make sure everything operates correctly.

I finished up the rough in of the rack. I built a platform to lift the rack up off of the top of the riser. Because the rack pulls out, you need a minimum of 3" of clearance.



I know it is overkill, but I decided to use some scrap wood to build some extra supports under the rack. The weight capacity of the rack is only 450 pounds, but I figured it couldn't hurt.



Then I installed a layer of 3/4" OSB to top off the platform.



I then installed the rack to test everything out. I almost messed up when installing the rack pan on the platform. I almost forgot that the wall on the left will have 1" acoustic treatments, so the opening has to be shifted to the right so that it will be centered with the treatments installed. Now that the rack is installed, I can measure for the final trim and frame in the front side of the closet.



Side view of the rack pulled out with service rails installed.



Side view of rack rotated for access to the rear of the rack.



I am extremely happy with the overall quality of the rack. I am really happy I went with the MA rack over a DIY rack. With that said, I have to admit that there is one thing I didn't understand about the rack prior to purchasing it. I just assumed the service rails slid out from under the rack and you put the service stand under the rails to support them. Then you could simply slide out the rack for maintenance. In reality, a panel is removed from the bottom of the rack, you line up the service rails and bolt them on and then you can slide out the rack. Not a huge deal. I don't plan to pull the rack out very often once it is finished, but you need to have a place to store the rails and stand when not in use. They aren't tiny, so they will require some closet space.

Plenty to do this weekend, so hopefully the boss will let me keep working in the basement.
post #690 of 1235
Coming along nicely, Nick! Not sure if I missed it, but did you get a door for it? Or will you be leaving the equipment exposed?

On my own rack I came up with a relatively inexpensive solution for getting power to stuff in the rack. The rackmount strips are nice, but the ones with surge suppression are more expensive and you need to move to a twist-lock plug to get 20a out of them.

I used one of these:


I have it hardwired through a surge suppressing receptacle:


I have my UPS on a different circuit and have the server plugged into that.
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