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SRS has a idea about the future of Surround

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
What do you think about this idea?

http://www.engadget.com/2011/01/06/s...-our-speakers/

"SRS Labs' suite was sportin' a number a devices showcasing Surround Everywhere, technology that lets you enjoy surround sound anywhere you go, laptops, phones, so yeah, anywhere. But the coolest thing we came away with was their vision of how surround sound should be mastered. Many in the industry are strungling with the transition from 5.1 to 7.1 and let's face it, about the time the studios get their arms around 7.1, we'll be asking for 9.1. So this new idea is to record where the audio is supposed to come from, instead of which speaker it should be played on. This way a movie would never need its audio remastered again, because the fact that the plane coming in at 2 O'Clock wouldn't change no matter how many speakers you had, it wouldn't even matter if you had a speaker placed precisely at 2 O'Clock. So basically your AVR would render the audio on the fly based on the number of speakers, and where you placed those speakers by using the recorded sounds and the data about those sounds. Kinda blew your mind right? The problem of course is at this point its just a cool idea and until content is created this way, there's no chance we'll actually be able to realize the benifits of this dream. Either way, we do commend SRS Labs for dreaming."

There is also this THX Concept Sound. Basically precisely directed Surround
http://ces.cnet.com/?tag=hdr
post #2 of 7
SRS has been claiming surround sound from 2 speakers for years. None of the products I have ever heard were convincing at all. Usually a feature on boom boxes and cheap all in one stereos. Surround sound from your laptop or phone? Call me skeptical.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristoffer77 View Post
(1) This would appear to be a "suggestion" to get the sound recording industry to move to "replay device independent" encoding [sometimes described as analogous to encoding and decoding an Adobe PostScript file]. Presumably SRS has come up with some 'meta code language and architecture' which allows definition and (appropriate) reassembly of recorded audio once it has been encoded at a requisite level of granularity. However, a significant issue would seem to be how to arrange for new movies/music to be encoded in a compatible manner . . . plus the question of how/when to convert the existing stock of "legacy format" movies/music (e.g., either once-in-a-studio, or during-DVD/CD-playback).

(2) And the speaker layout [from SRS?] that is shown raises some interesting questions: It appears to contain 11 speakers--seven 'middle layer' in a conventional '7.x Standard' configuration, plus four 'upper layer' speakers: a Front Height pair, and a Rear Height pair. I guess this reminds me a little of the new LG HX996TS Real 3D Sound Home Theater System ["Its innovative new approach to audio includes the Vertical 3D Effect Channel, which works by emitting sound through the tops of the system's four Tallboy Speakers"].
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamZX11 View Post

SRS has been claiming surround sound from 2 speakers for years. None of the products I have ever heard were convincing at all. Usually a feature on boom boxes and cheap all in one stereos. Surround sound from your laptop or phone? Call me skeptical.

True, but unlike all legacy SRS's methods this is an entirely new and complete recording to playback system that is a totally revolutionary idea. It completely forgoes the current method of recording/playback of discreet channel streams and instead relies on (embedded) meta data for all aspects, from recording locations to playback codecs/channels. In effect all audio recording is done in 1.0 but contains an infinite amount of placement/location (channel) info.

Here is an informative Podcast with Alan Kraemer, Executive VP and CTO of SRS about the system.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post

True, but unlike all legacy SRS's methods this is an entirely new and complete recording to playback system that is a totally revolutionary idea. It completely forgoes the current method of recording/playback of discreet channel streams and instead relies on (embedded) meta data for all aspects, from recording locations to playback codecs/channels. In effect all audio recording is done in 1.0 but contains an infinite amount of placement/location (channel) info.

Here is an informative Podcast with Alan Kraemer, Executive VP and CTO of SRS about the system.

The idea of utilizing my amps/speakers in the best possible approximation of the sound mixer's intent is great!

The requirement for content producers, and me! to replace (read: "upgrade"!) every technology element between the sound mixing console and the master-volume-control in my home theater in order to make that happen . . . not so great!

And of course, it's completely coincidental than a large chunk of the technology license fees that Dolby, DTS, Audyssey and Sony (plus no doubt many others) would have collected in the future might now go to SRS...!?

Call me in 4 or 5 years when some near complete element of this 'technology paradigm shift' (sic) seems like it might deliver a realistic prospect of improved sound performance in my home at a 'fiscally responsible' cost...
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kristoffer77 View Post

What do you think about this idea? http://www.engadget.com/2011/01/06/s...-our-speakers/

(1) This would appear to be a "suggestion" to get the sound recording industry to move to "replay device independent" encoding [sometimes described as analogous to encoding and decoding an Adobe PostScript file]. Presumably SRS has come up with some 'meta code language and architecture' which allows definition and (appropriate) reassembly of recorded audio once it has been encoded at a requisite level of granularity. However, a significant issue would seem to be how to arrange for new movies/music to be encoded in a compatible manner . . . plus the question of how/when to convert the existing stock of "legacy format" movies/music (e.g., either once-in-a-studio, or during-DVD/CD-playback).

(2) And the speaker layout [from SRS?] that is shown raises some interesting questions: It appears to contain 11 speakers--seven 'middle layer' in a conventional '7.x Standard' configuration, plus four 'upper layer' speakers: a Front Height pair, and a Rear Height pair. <<snip>>

A closer examination of the 'SRS'--or perhaps more correctly '3DAA Promotional'--11.x speaker layout pictured in the original article suggests that it might actually be an instance of the 3DAA "sample speaker configuration" shown as Figure 3 on Page 2 of the 3DAA Technical Roadmap document. Although probably not intended as an example of a consumer home theater layout, it does show yet another possible configuration for 11.x speakers! This (new?) setup contains 9 speakers arranged somewhat conventionally as '7.x Standard + Front Height pair' . . . with speakers 10 and 11 arranged as a 'Left and Right Top pair' (or perhaps intended as a 'Left and Right Top/Back pair'...?) IIRC, I last saw a similar 'Top/Back pair' speaker configuration on CS-3X decoders--which I think were built on technology licensed from SRS...?!
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post

Here is an informative Podcast with Alan Kraemer, Executive VP and CTO of SRS about the system.

Another interview with Alan Kraemer (at CES 2011). This interview discusses the implications of 3DAA a little more simply . . . and "suggests" we might look for consumer impact no earlier than 2014.
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