or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Flat Panels General and OLED Technology › 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts? - Page 63

post #1861 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

They have made changes to BD's specs since 2006.
Sure, but since Blu-ray 3D discs were backward compatible that is very different. Adding MPEG-4 AVC Hi10P video to a new version of Blu-ray would have completely broken backward compatibility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Would something prevent the USA from adding 8bits to their version of UHDTV standard?
The UHDTV color space is larger than the HDTV color space so I think that would be a bad idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Again, has SMPTE accepted the standards of both 4K and 8K as they are shown in that attachment you linked?
From what I have read an ITU standard is very important in terms of international standards. As for the SMPTE UHDTV standard it costs $75 to download it so I am not sure what it says.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

But that doesn't mean they will reach High - Level 6, 6.1 or 6.2 in that time frame right?
The Main profile of HEVC will be finalized in January 2013 and the plan is to release additional HEVC profiles a year after that. I don't know when Level 6 HEVC decoders will be released but how does that matter in terms of additional HEVC profiles?
post #1862 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

Sure, but since Blu-ray 3D discs were backward compatible that is very different. Adding MPEG-4 AVC Hi10P video to a new version of Blu-ray would have completely broken backward compatibility.

That is only if the studio desires their 3D BD to be playable in 2D on a non 3D BD player. Not all 3D BDs are backwards compatible. It is optional, not mandatory. Sony released a 3D BD that says right on the cover - plays in 3D only.
Quote:
The UHDTV color space is larger than the HDTV color space so I think that would be a bad idea.

You may think it's a bad idea - what does Hollywood think? We have only heard from CEMs when it comes to UHDTV. Not a peep from the studios other than Sony. What does WB think? They are the largest seller of home video out of all the studios. How about Disney?
Quote:
From what I have read an ITU standard is very important in terms of international standards. As for the SMPTE UHDTV standard it costs $75 to download it so I am not sure what it says.

Have you seen this?

http://www.hdtvmagazine.com/columns/2011/04/hdtv-almanac-smpte-develops-new-hdtv-format.php
Quote:
The Main profile of HEVC will be finalized in January 2013 and the plan is to release additional HEVC profiles a year after that. I don't know when Level 6 HEVC decoders will be released but how does that matter in terms of additional HEVC profiles?

My bad - It isn't until High - Level 5 that HEVC starts addressing UHDTV - 2160P. And that has a max frame rate of 32 fps. All Levels previous to 5 deal with HD resolution or less.
post #1863 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Do you realize that Sony is shutting down their optical drive plants? http://akibatech31.wordpress.com/2012/08/27/sony-to-leave-pc-optical-drive-business-nears-end-of-restructuring/
Those plants made parts for CD, DVD, and Bluray (PC and laptop), but that article does mention that Bluray drives will still be made for audio video. Sony has already quit making the Sony 7000ES changers and stated that don't plan to make any more changers. Sony will have design a completely new drive for 4k Bluray, and only offer it at single disc solution. Also realize that the Sony's for bluray patent is set to expire in 2018. I don't know of a company that continued to make a product with only 5 years left on the life cycle. (Sony has lot of problems now, but that wouldn't be a wise decision) I suspect that Sony is building a new plant on new technology. Sony in the meantime might just use the cloud and SSD drive like their competitor Apple is doing. (Sony has stated that they are focusing on the cloud for content delivery). Apple is Sony's biggest competitor now.
Any update on the Apple iPanel?

If you read the article in your link, they are shutting down the blu-ray drives they make for the PC market, and will continue to make them for blu-ray and dvd players. Plus, they are going to need about 20 million 4K blu-ray drives for Christmas 2013 with the release of the PS4k.
post #1864 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

A flat panel can only show images in it's native resolution. All it could do is upscale 4K to 8K. The same way a 1080P FPD upscales 720P to 1080P.

Really? I am using a flat panel now and I can change the resolution. You might need a video scaler or video card with displayPort 1.2. to change the resolution. Actually, REDRAY player states that if can downscale and upscale, but it is for the projector.
post #1865 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

If you read the article in your link, they are shutting down the blu-ray drives they make for the PC market, and will continue to make them for blu-ray and dvd players. Plus, they are going to need about 20 million 4K blu-ray drives for Christmas 2013 with the release of the PS4k.

Yes, it supplies parts to the other plants. I stated that it is PC based. Recall that a Tsunami hit japan too in 2011, which also affected bluray production. Sony just has stated on much on which plants. The 7000ES changers are running short on parts now. Sony hasn't made a statement to the press yet, that the PS4 will have 4k Bluray. I have seen rumours, but no official word from Sony. Sony could eliminate the drive from the PS4 by using SSD, which would make more sense because of the data rate problem with current bluray and 4k. (According to NHK, data rate was primary problem with 4k Bluray.) Actually, you can hot-swap the SSD drive. I have that on my new chenbro case. I don't see Holographic disc till about 2015.

Your estimate for PS4 is 20 million units, so what is Sony's profit on those 20 million units? Sony is hurting for money, so they are shutting down plants. You might want a PS4, but it might be awhile. I doubt if you have 20 million 4k TV sets sold by Christmas 2013.
Edited by Nitro67 - 9/16/12 at 11:43pm
post #1866 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

So these average consumers who don't want BD. Why are they going to want 4K?


I think it is 80% of the average consumers are doing streaming alone. Not many will want to go to 4k. Just the people that can afford it. Cost is way to high right now for people to consider 4k.
Edited by Nitro67 - 9/16/12 at 11:36pm
post #1867 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Really? I am using a flat panel now and I can change the resolution. You might need a video scaler or video card with displayPort 1.2. to change the resolution. Actually, REDRAY player states that if can downscale and upscale, but it is for the projector.

How can you change the resolution of a FPD? If it's a 1920x1080, then all 1920x1080 pixels are going to be lit. It isn't like you can turn off pixels and make it a 1280x720. The fact that you can use all 1920x1080 pixels to show a lower resolution, that's just a normal function of the display.
post #1868 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Yes, it supplies parts to the other plants. I stated that it is PC based. Recall that a Tsunami hit japan too in 2011. The 7000ES changers are running short on parts now. Sony hasn't made a statement to the press yet, that the PS4 will have 4k Bluray. I have seen rumours, but no official word from Sony. Sony could eliminate the drive from the PS4 by using SSD, which would make more sense because of the data rate problem with current bluray and 4k. Actually, you can hot-swap the SSD drive. I have that on my new case.

And if Andy Parsons is right, then no special 4K BD drive is necessary. It will again be a 2X speed BD drive. Regular BDs uses a 1X speed drive. 3D BD uses a 2X speed drive. That is how they increased the bit rate for 3D BD by 50%. They can do the same thing with 4K BD. Maybe . . . Maybe go to a 4X BD drive - an off-the-shelf item
Edited by Lee Stewart - 9/16/12 at 11:56pm
post #1869 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And if Andy Parsons is right, then no special 4K BD drive is necessary. It will again be a 2X speed BD drive. Regular BDs uses a 1X speed drive. 3D BD uses a 2X speed drive. That is how they increased the bit rate for 3D BD by 50%. They can do the same thing with 4K BD. Maybe . . . Maybe go to a 4X BD drive - an off-the-shelf item


I would guess that is correct. With h.265 expected to need only about 20 mbps for 4K, the current blu-ray drives should be adequate. Although, they might use the more expensive 6X speed BDXL drives that can read quad layer 128GB blu ray. They currently retail for around $100 vs $50 for 2X standard Blu-ray, but if volume increases OEM prices should come way down.
post #1870 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

I would guess that is correct. With h.265 expected to need only about 20 mbps for 4K, the current blu-ray drives should be adequate. Although, they might use the more expensive 6X speed BDXL drives that can read quad layer 128GB blu ray. They currently retail for around $100 vs $50 for 2X standard Blu-ray, but if volume increases OEM prices should come way down.

You think Sony may have learned it's lesson about putting "the kitchen sink" in the PS3 and won't make the same mistake with the PS4.? Why would Sony put an expensive drive like the BDXL in a game console? It's overkill and has no real function.
post #1871 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

4K is about of sure of a bet as I have seen in a long time. 4K is more of an evolutionary step. Like records going from 78's to LPs. 4K once mass produced, will not add a substantial amount to the cost of the display and the 4K discs will use the already established blu-ray infrastructure. In 3 years you will not be able to buy a new blu-ray player that doesn't have native 4K and probably in 5 years 4K will take over the sales led form 1080p sets. Even Joe public going to Wal-Mart will be able to see the advantage of 4K. Sharper picture, better color, passive full HD 3D, up converting 1080i, 2 program split view, etc. So even if it is $500 more by that time the choice will be clear. The only thing that could derail it is OLED miraculous finding a technological break through that will somehow make them cost effective.

I agree. 4K is inevitable. I doubt it will even cost $500 more. I would guess all the higher end TVs will support it and the ones that don't will be at the low end. Higher end TVs will cost more. Maybe a few hundred more, but it won't be just be because of 4K. They'll be better TVs overall. Like the way 3D is currently standard on higher end TVs.

A few years back, there were a lot of people saying 3D was a fad and wouldn't last. There are no 3D movies available, It requires twice as much bandwidth, etc... . Now, all of the higher end TVs are 3D TVs. Regardless of whether or not you view 3D as successful or not, it's pervasive and isn't going away.

History shows consumer electronics never rests. There are incremental improvements every year. I expect 4K to follow this trend.
post #1872 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Really? I am using a flat panel now and I can change the resolution. You might need a video scaler or video card with displayPort 1.2. to change the resolution. Actually, REDRAY player states that if can downscale and upscale, but it is for the projector.

I think you're confusing what kind of input the TV is capable of displaying vs what it's actually displaying.
post #1873 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

You think Sony may have learned it's lesson about putting "the kitchen sink" in the PS3 and won't make the same mistake with the PS4.? Why would Sony put an expensive drive like the BDXL in a game console? It's overkill and has no real function.

In hindsight, Sony was very smart to put blu-ray drives in the PS3. it gave them a big edge over the XBox.

When the PS4 starts manufacturing, maybe sometime in Q3 of next year and considering the quantities of drives they' ll use, it may only cost an extra $10 per unit to include the faster drives. The PS4 will almost certainly support 4K since almost all new AMD video cards support it now. Having the extra bandwidth may prove to be a big selling point down the road. Keep in mind that consoles are expected to have a selling life of 8 or so years. What may seem useless now can be very useful in a few years.
post #1874 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

I agree. 4K is inevitable. I doubt it will even cost $500 more. I would guess all the higher end TVs will support it and the ones that don't will be at the low end. Higher end TVs will cost more. Maybe a few hundred more, but it won't be just be because of 4K. They'll be better TVs overall. Like the way 3D is currently standard on higher end TVs.

Still waiting for that link that says 4K panel manufacturing is just a little bit more expensive than HD panel manufacturing.
Quote:
A few years back, there were a lot of people saying 3D was a fad and wouldn't last. There are no 3D movies available, It requires twice as much bandwidth, etc... . Now, all of the higher end TVs are 3D TVs. Regardless of whether or not you view 3D as successful or not, it's pervasive and isn't going away.
History shows consumer electronics never rests. There are incremental improvements every year. I expect 4K to follow this trend.

The first 3DTVs went on sale in April 2010. The first 3D BD came out June 2010. Both DirecTV and Comcast were showing 3D content on their services shortly afterwards.

The cost to add 3D to an HDTV is less than $50. The real upcharge was in the active shutter glasses.
post #1875 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

In hindsight, Sony was very smart to put blu-ray drives in the PS3. it gave them a big edge over the XBox.

No it didn't. It cost them over $4 billion in losses and the Play Station went from the #1 game console (PS2) to last place behind the Xbox 360 and the Wii.
Quote:
When the PS4 starts manufacturing, maybe sometime in Q3 of next year and considering the quantities of drives they' ll use, it may only cost an extra $10 per unit to include the faster drives. The PS4 will almost certainly support 4K since almost all new AMD video cards support it now. Having the extra bandwidth may prove to be a big selling point down the road. Keep in mind that consoles are expected to have a selling life of 8 or so years. What may seem useless now can be very useful in a few years.

Has Sony specifically said the PS4 will support 4K or is that just another rumor?

8 years? So the PS3 won't be replaced until 2014 not 2013.
post #1876 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

No it didn't. It cost them over $4 billion in losses and the Play Station went from the #1 game console (PS2) to last place behind the Xbox 360 and the Wii.

Where's the link showing that adding a blu-ray drive in the PS3 cost sony $4 Billion?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Has Sony specifically said the PS4 will support 4K or is that just another rumor?
8 years? So the PS3 won't be replaced until 2014 not 2013.

Sony has been quiet on the PS4. I stated they almost certainly will support 4K because any AMD video card they'll use supports 4K video. The PS4 is currently supposed to be released prior to christmas 2013.

Here's one of many links on the ps4 (I suggest you use google if you want more information).
http://www.tgdaily.com/games-and-entertainment-features/65631-report-sonys-ps4-will-support-4k-resolution
post #1877 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Still waiting for that link that says 4K panel manufacturing is just a little bit more expensive than HD panel manufacturing.

Do you like to disagree for the sake of disagreeing?

How can I post a link that shows how much the cost difference between making a 4K panel and a non-4k panel is going to be in 5 years?
post #1878 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

Do you like to disagree for the sake of disagreeing?
How can I post a link that shows how much the cost difference between making a 4K panel and a non-4k panel is going to be in 5 years?

Oh - so that comment is nothing more than wild speculation. rolleyes.gif
post #1879 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

Where's the link showing that adding a blu-ray drive in the PS3 cost sony $4 Billion?

Sony made the PS3 so expensive, they had to sell them for a loss. That loss totaled over $3 billion.

http://kotaku.com/5018899/sony-lost-over-3-billion-to-ps3-cost-pricing-imbalance

They lost another $1.7B since then.

http://www.vg247.com/2009/10/30/sony-ps-division-has-lost-4-7-billion-since-launching-ps3/
Quote:
Sony has been quiet on the PS4. I stated they almost certainly will support 4K because any AMD video card they'll use supports 4K video. The PS4 is currently supposed to be released prior to christmas 2013.

Again, is this info coming from Sony or from rumors?
Quote:
Here's one of many links on the ps4 (I suggest you use google if you want more information).
http://www.tgdaily.com/games-and-entertainment-features/65631-report-sonys-ps4-will-support-4k-resolution

Right - rumors:

Little is known about Sony's next-gen console, although the company has confirmed the PS4 will offer "significant" enhancements.
post #1880 of 3670
You can use Google to find the information about the PS4. Many reliable sources and logic dictates it will have 4K playback, keep in mind this is different from 4K real time gaming which would require higher FPS and rendering in real time. Also, all but confirmed for Christmas 2013 release, unless they hit manufacturing problems. After the Xbox 360 beat them to market by a year, they vowed never to let them them get the jump on them again. As for adding 4K to displays, from what I understand more transistors are added to the backplane, h.265 decoders are needed and processing chip to render. No major technological hurdles to overcome, just need volume to increase to reduce cost. Finally, as to just speculation, that is the whole point of the thread is it not? 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?
post #1881 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

You can use Google to find the information about the PS4. Many reliable sources and logic dictates it will have 4K playback, keep in mind this is different from 4K real time gaming which would require higher FPS and rendering in real time. Also, all but confirmed for Christmas 2013 release, unless they hit manufacturing problems. After the Xbox 360 beat them to market by a year, they vowed never to let them them get the jump on them again. As for adding 4K to displays, from what I understand more transistors are added to the backplane, h.265 decoders are needed and processing chip to render. No major technological hurdles to overcome, just need volume to increase to reduce cost. Finally, as to just speculation, that is the whole point of the thread is it not? 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?

The only reliable sources for the PS4, that I would consider, would be Sony themselves and there is almost nothing from Sony on it's future plans concerning a replacement for the PS3.

It would be helpful for all to debunk rumors and provide facts . . no?

In the mean time, Wii has already released their new console the Wii U right? #1 selling console from the previous go-round. Now the first GCM to have the next version out for sale.

BTW . . .
Quote:
4K×2K LCD TV panels are a big challenge for TFT LCD process yield rate and stability. In the current TFT LCD process, the yield rate and reliability of HD and FHD do differ much. However, when the pixel count quadruples, the yield rate will fall significantly. Meanwhile, the higher resolution means panel transmittance will be reduced because there are more pixels on the substrate. As analyzed in the TFT LCD Process Roadmap Report, there are many new technologies needed for this kind of ultra-high definition:

•High resolution photo lithography (high resolution patterning)
•SHA (super high aperture) ratio
•High mobility backplanes (such as oxide TFT or microcrystalline silicon)
•Copper (Cu) metallization
•BM (black matrix) width reduction
•The EE (electronics engineering) panel design: data/scan driving, input format compatibility, and value-added features including 4K up-conversion, 3D, and local dimming backlight.

http://www.electroiq.com/articles/sst/2012/07/how-4k-2k-lcd-tvs-affect-display-panel-manufacturing-yields.html
Edited by Lee Stewart - 9/17/12 at 4:46pm
post #1882 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

How can you change the resolution of a FPD? If it's a 1920x1080, then all 1920x1080 pixels are going to be lit. It isn't like you can turn off pixels and make it a 1280x720. The fact that you can use all 1920x1080 pixels to show a lower resolution, that's just a normal function of the display.

Anyone can resize a monitor. We use professional monitors at work. I don't think that I said TV in the post. Did I say turn off pixels? No!
post #1883 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And if Andy Parsons is right, then no special 4K BD drive is necessary. It will again be a 2X speed BD drive. Regular BDs uses a 1X speed drive. 3D BD uses a 2X speed drive. That is how they increased the bit rate for 3D BD by 50%. They can do the same thing with 4K BD. Maybe . . . Maybe go to a 4X BD drive - an off-the-shelf item

Here is the post from Hitachi Data Systems on data rates. http://blogs.hds.com/technomusings/2011/08/a-true-holographic-system-would-be-disruptive.html
I posted the data rates in the past, but you can read the blog from Hitachi.

NHK openhouse 2012 in May.

http://lcjapan.com/
"Now, Blu-ray might get there–it’s 25 GB per layer is already at 100 GB thanks to 4-layer discs, and 10-layer discs are not too far off. However, it’s not just the capacity: it’s the access speed. If the media can’t send the video data fast enough, it won’t work. And the guy I spoke to at NHK said that even with upgrades, Blu-ray just won’t be fast enough." There is photos on the liink with holographic storage, and thin disc alternatives. NHK is developing for 8k, but there is 2 different capacities holographic disc. So, you can draw your own conclusions from this article.

If you have access to journal articles (SPIE is the main one), it says the same thing about 4k bluray.
post #1884 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Here is the post from Hitachi Data Systems on data rates. http://blogs.hds.com/technomusings/2011/08/a-true-holographic-system-would-be-disruptive.html
I posted the data rates in the past, but you can read the blog from Hitachi.
NHK openhouse 2012 in May.
http://lcjapan.com/
"Now, Blu-ray might get there–it’s 25 GB per layer is already at 100 GB thanks to 4-layer discs, and 10-layer discs are not too far off. However, it’s not just the capacity: it’s the access speed. If the media can’t send the video data fast enough, it won’t work. And the guy I spoke to at NHK said that even with upgrades, Blu-ray just won’t be fast enough." There is photos on the liink with holographic storage, and thin disc alternatives. NHK is developing for 8k, but there is 2 different capacities holographic disc. So, you can draw your own conclusions from this article.
If you have access to journal articles (SPIE is the main one), it says the same thing about 4k bluray.

Q: What is Sony Pictures' position on upgrading the Blu-ray specs to put 4K and 8K native video on a BD disc (ultra-high-def specs are 3840x2160 lines of resolution for 4K and 7680x4320 for 8K, current 1080p specs are 1920X1080)?

Marty: As mentioned, the Blu-ray format is well-positioned to adapt to evolving standards. As the future unfolds, Sony Pictures is in a good position with our asset library, given that we already master a number of titles at 4K resolution.

Q: I was wondering if you think that Blu-ray is in fact the last physical format or if you see something like SD cards replacing it in the future.

Parsons: I’ve learned to avoid trying to predict the future, but I do think that new physical formats are based on specific applications that mandate their use. For standard-definition, we had DVD, which did the best possible job of presenting content in that resolution. For HDTV, we have Blu-ray, which has enough capacity to present 1080p images and uncompressed sound with the highest possible quality available. Fortunately, if and when 4K begins to make an entrance on the scene, Blu-ray has enough capacity to handle that job, too.

Q: Apple has made a point of saying that its new retina displays actually have more pixels than an HDTV, suggesting the picture quality is better than Blu-ray. Do you think Blu-ray will be able to become more high-def with greater resolution? Is there a next-gen HD in the works?

Parsons: We are already at the maximum resolution available for the HDTV systems currently in use around the world (1080p), so the only way to become “more high def” would be to incorporate 4K resolution into the format. At present, the BDA is not working on a 4K version of Blu-ray, but if and when the time comes to do that, we believe the 50GB capacity should allow us to accommodate the much higher data rates that 4K sources require.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/blu-ray-disc/sony-s-marty-bda-s-parsons-talk-blu-ray-27515
post #1885 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

That is only if the studio desires their 3D BD to be playable in 2D on a non 3D BD player. Not all 3D BDs are backwards compatible. It is optional, not mandatory. Sony released a 3D BD that says right on the cover - plays in 3D only.
It is true that "The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup Film" Blu-ray 3D disc was not backward compatible. Still with the Blu-ray 3D format it is notable that over 98% of current Blu-ray 3D discs are backward compatible. If the BDA had released a new Blu-ray format that used MPEG-4 AVC Hi10P video there would have been no backward compatibility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

You may think it's a bad idea - what does Hollywood think? We have only heard from CEMs when it comes to UHDTV.
The UHDTV color space is much larger than the HDTV color space so 8-bit UHDTV video would mean that a color space with almost twice the number of colors would have to be encoded with the same amount of bits. Technically speaking it can be done but I suspect it would cause noticeable video issues and that is why they didn't list 8-bit video as an option in the UHDTV standard.

Quote:
That is a very funny article.
Edited by Richard Paul - 9/18/12 at 7:39am
post #1886 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

I also found the; 4K Toshiba 55ZL2B LED, 4x1080p, Glasses-Free 3D Smart TV, 55 Inch at £6,999 = 11,350.38 USD. (AU Optronics supplying the panel) Supposedly a crap 3D TV but OK as a 4K 2D TV.
My guess is that Toshiba scrap the Glasse-Free version as soon as they have sold their inventory and introduce a regular 4K TV with 3D (glasses). That was my impression from IFA reports.
So this more "convenient size" 55" 4K TV, compared in price to larger HD TVs, and it doesn't come out as extreme as the LG and Sony prices.

That Toshiba 4K TV will only accept 4K content using Toshiba's proprietary digital serial port. As a consumer 4K TV, that's worthless. It's an Autostereoscopic 3DTV that uses a 4K panel to get the H. res up to 720 per eye for 9 views.
post #1887 of 3670
Anyone know what ever happened to Dolby's High Dynamic Range LCD Television Tech?

http://www.dolby.com/uploadedFiles/zz-_Shared_Assets/English_PDFs/Professional/dolby-hdr-video-technical-overview.pdf
post #1888 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

It is true that "The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup Film" Blu-ray 3D disc was not backward compatible. Still with the Blu-ray 3D format it is notable that over 98% of current Blu-ray 3D discs are backward compatible. If the BDA had released a new Blu-ray format that used MPEG-4 AVC Hi10P video there would have been no backward compatibility.

Look again - differtent thread . . .

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1430009/anyone-come-across-any-3d-bds-that-do-not-play-on-a-regular-bd-player#post_22413466
post #1889 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Anyone know what ever happened to Dolby's High Dynamic Range LCD Television Tech?
http://www.dolby.com/uploadedFiles/zz-_Shared_Assets/English_PDFs/Professional/dolby-hdr-video-technical-overview.pdf
Quote:
Dolby’s HDR technologies address LCD display limitations through proprietary designs that employ locally modulated LED backlighting rather than the current conventional cold-cathode fluorescent (CCFL) tubes.
Isn't that what we call LCD TVs today?
Anyway, don't you see real progress in increasing maximum brightness (white level) instead of endlessly focusing on black level? Even the slightest drop in black levels will produce huge contrast improvements on paper. On the other side, increasing maximum brightness (white level) seems like a way to go. Am I wrong? Please answer.
post #1890 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomoneh View Post

Isn't that what we call LCD TVs today?
Anyway, don't you see real progress in increasing maximum brightness (white level) instead of endlessly focusing on black level? Even the slightest drop in black levels will produce huge contrast improvements on paper. On the other side, increasing maximum brightness (white level) seems like a way to go. Am I wrong? Please answer.

No - not the same. I believe it's the former BrightSide HDR display tech that Dolby bought:

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/BrightSide-High-Dynamic-Range-Display-Technology/208
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Flat Panels General and OLED Technology › 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?