or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Flat Panels General and OLED Technology › 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts? - Page 67

post #1981 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Why should you care about how much compression is used? Are you an video compression expert? You are happy with BD - you must be with such a large collection, and it is highly compressed.

I want better picture quality, but some people like Divx picture quality vs DVD. Actually, I had both Bluray and and HD DVD. Depending on the release, HD DVD was a better format. There are several films that are HD DVD that have never been released. The biggest problem with BD is the quality control on one movie. There has been several BD movies that have been released 3 or 4 times. Although, it was confusing to have 2 different formats of players.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

If you are waiting for Holographic Disc to be used to deliver prerecorded movies, then be prepared to wait for at least 10 years. By then 4K will be old tech and 8K will be just coming out.

Holographic disc was designed for UHDTV (8K). NHK (Japan) wants to wait for (8k) instead of upgrading to (4k) now. The USA wanted (4k), but if (4k) came out in 2010 then it would had a chance. Personally, I am reluctant as a consumer to buy a (4K) set 2013 with no media out, no broadcasting, etc. I would rather wait till UHDTV2 (8K) comes out in 2020. Most consumers would also wait till 2020.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

A 4K format on a new physical media that would necessitate the retail price being $100 would be considered a major failure. It would be a niche product that will have an extremely small adoption rate - just like LD did with their $80 and $90 CAV special editions. It is not the intention of the CEMs to introduce a niche product. They want it to go mass market. THAT is where the money is, not selling to 1% of the total market. That is left to the "boutique" companies whose sales are tiny in comparison to the major CEMs.
People are going to ask:
1. What does it look like?
2. How much does it cost?
3. If I wait, what's next?
Because there is always something "next." Believe me, no one wants a format where they have to pay $100 per title versus the $25 they are paying today.

Holographic disc was designed to be cheaper than bluray, but regardless of what I post. You will say that it will be another 10 years before we will see it. There is a 2 tier design in all products today, but most people don't even know about it. For example, most people tend to buy their Flat Panels at Best Buy, Walmart, Sam's etc. They don't realize that there is also professional flat panels, that last longer than consumer models. A co-worker bought a consumer brand flat panel and it only lasted 2 years. True, the market is for the consumer brand. Although, you are not stuck with buying just the consumer brand, there is always better quality products.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

As far as how much 4K content could be available? Much more than the "less than 50 movies" you claim. It's over 300. That includes 4K productions, 65mm productions and IMAX docs.
Actually, if I recall, you was complaining that there is not even content available. So, have you ordered your new 4k TV yet?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

You suspect wrong. The next version of HDMI will be released later this year to specifically address 4K at higher frame rates and higher frame rate 3D. The industry has standardized on HDMI. That isn't going to change in the foreseeable future

Do you remember the floppy disk was installed in all new computers? Now you have a larger USB drive and you didn't even realize it. So how is HDMI going to disappear? The answer will be a technology from Apple called DisplayPort. Apple is now working with Intel, so soon it be on all kinds of devices. DisplayPort is now on new video cards, and soon TV's. Apple is replacing the HDMI, and you don't realize it. The problem with HDMI is that it requires a switch, but DisplayPort and Thunderbolt eliminate the switch. It is old technology from the 1980's called Daisy chaining. DisplayPort is royalty free, so companies will incorporate that port on the electronic devices. Actually, I seen a few Thunderbolt HDMI Hub prototypes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Higher Cable TV bills are based on the content providers charges. Building your own network doesn't change that. IP service is different.
No! It is called overhead. Anyway, here is the new fiber that is coming for rural communities by state.

It will vary on the state, but in mine there is 700,000 homes getting hooked to fiber. Each Project is different, but it seems to be coming. Who is paying for it? Well, you are!

http://www2.ntia.doc.gov/infrastructure

http://www2.ntia.doc.gov/all-recipients
post #1982 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

I want better picture quality, but some people like Divx picture quality vs DVD. Actually, I had both Bluray and and HD DVD. Depending on the release, HD DVD was a better format. There are several films that are HD DVD that have never been released. The biggest problem with BD is the quality control on one movie. There has been several BD movies that have been released 3 or 4 times. Although, it was confusing to have 2 different formats of players.
Holographic disc was designed for UHDTV (8K). NHK (Japan) wants to wait for (8k) instead of upgrading to (4k) now. The USA wanted (4k), but if (4k) came out in 2010 then it would had a chance. Personally, I am reluctant as a consumer to buy a (4K) set 2013 with no media out, no broadcasting, etc. I would rather wait till UHDTV2 (8K) comes out in 2020. Most consumers would also wait till 2020.

Bad assumption. That 8K will be released here in the USA the same time it is released in Japan. Do you live in Japan?
Quote:
Holographic disc was designed to be cheaper than bluray, but regardless of what I post. You will say that it will be another 10 years before we will see it. There is a 2 tier design in all products today, but most people don't even know about it. For example, most people tend to buy their Flat Panels at Best Buy, Walmart, Sam's etc. They don't realize that there is also professional flat panels, that last longer than consumer models. A co-worker bought a consumer brand flat panel and it only lasted 2 years. True, the market is for the consumer brand. Although, you are not stuck with buying just the consumer brand, there is always better quality products.

I don't see how it could be cheaper than BD. That would mean each HVD would be less than $1.

You are right. I will maintain it will be at least 10 years before they start selling prerecorded movies to average consumers on HVD.
Quote:
Actually, if I recall, you was complaining that there is not even content available. So, have you ordered your new 4k TV yet?

No - I said what production sources could provide 4k content - to correct your error. I will be passing on 4K.
Quote:
Do you remember the floppy disk was installed in all new computers? Now you have a larger USB drive and you didn't even realize it. So how is HDMI going to disappear? The answer will be a technology from Apple called DisplayPort. Apple is now working with Intel, so soon it be on all kinds of devices. DisplayPort is now on new video cards, and soon TV's. Apple is replacing the HDMI, and you don't realize it. The problem with HDMI is that it requires a switch, but DisplayPort and Thunderbolt eliminate the switch. It is old technology from the 1980's called Daisy chaining. DisplayPort is royalty free, so companies will incorporate that port on the electronic devices. Actually, I seen a few Thunderbolt HDMI Hub prototypes.

Apple owns a tiny share of the overall market. They don't dictate which way the total market goes, just for their own products. There are already 100s of millions of devices that use HDMI.
Quote:
No! It is called overhead. Anyway, here is the new fiber that is coming for rural communities by state.
It will vary on the state, but in mine there is 700,000 homes getting hooked to fiber. Each Project is different, but it seems to be coming. Who is paying for it? Well, you are!
http://www2.ntia.doc.gov/infrastructure
http://www2.ntia.doc.gov/all-recipients

Those say nothing about Cable TV. Just IP. Two different services. You said people are compalining about their $200 Cable bills. A large part of that monthly biill is what they pay for TV service, not what they pay for Internet service.
post #1983 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Bad assumption. That 8K will be released here in the USA the same time it is released in Japan. Do you live in Japan?
No! Actually, it has been written in several article from NHK. Why? Simple, it has to do with costs. Actually, Richard had it posted in an post a few pages back. No, I don't live in Japan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

I don't see how it could be cheaper than BD. That would mean each HVD would be less than $1.

I will use this chart from this article. http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-48/issue-02/world-news/holographic-data-storage-uses-volumetric-crystal-media.html I have posted it in the past, but the hard drive cost would be based on Enterprise drive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

No - I said what production sources could provide 4k content - to correct your error. I will be passing on 4K.
So how about 8K?

Hmm, patent awarded to GE for holographic replication system. Probably nothing, but just found it laser focus world.
http://www.laserfocusworld.com/news/2012/09/04/u-s-patents-awarded-to-inventors-in-new-york-aug-31.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Apple owns a tiny share of the overall market. They don't dictate which way the total market goes, just for their own products. There are already 100s of millions of devices that use HDMI.
HDMI is based on DVI technology, and it soon to be replaced by DisplayPort. Apple wiped out the floppy disc drive, the PC market is couple hundred million. (Nvidia and AMD already have put DisplayPort 1.2 in their latest video cards)
Here is the briefing. http://www.vesa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/ICCE-Presentation-on-VESA-DisplayPort.pdf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Those say nothing about Cable TV. Just IP. Two different services. You said people are compalining about their $200 Cable bills. A large part of that monthly biill is what they pay for TV service, not what they pay for Internet service.

Lost me here? Anyway, eventually cable TV will go over IP. The problem is Cable TV is rather slow to adopt. Oh, the $200 bill is with these bundles that people buy. Eventually, it will be all fiber. So you could do it all over the IP.
post #1984 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

No! Actually, it has been written in several article from NHK. Why? Simple, it has to do with costs. Actually, Richard had it posted in an post a few pages back. No, I don't live in Japan.

No what?
Quote:
I will use this chart from this article. http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-48/issue-02/world-news/holographic-data-storage-uses-volumetric-crystal-media.html I have posted it in the past, but the hard drive cost would be based on Enterprise drive.

I am not talking about a per GB cost. I am talking about a per UNIT cost. And I see nothing that even mentions Hollywood movies in your link. That's the point isn't it? Not some data backup system.
Quote:
So how about 8K?

Absolutely. . . when it becomes affordable.
Quote:
HDMI is based on DVI technology, and it soon to be replaced by DisplayPort. Apple wiped out the floppy disc drive, the PC market is couple hundred million. (Nvidia and AMD already have put DisplayPort 1.2 in their latest video cards)
Here is the briefing. http://www.vesa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/ICCE-Presentation-on-VESA-DisplayPort.pdf

So what about Televisions, BD players, AVRs, CBL/SAT/TELCO STBs, etc - when are they going to get DisplayPort?
Quote:
Lost me here? Anyway, eventually cable TV will go over IP. The problem is Cable TV is rather slow to adopt. Oh, the $200 bill is with these bundles that people buy. Eventually, it will be all fiber. So you could do it all over the IP.

You have it backwards, IP goes over cable. Eventually all fiber . . how many decades will that take? And what relivance does that have with providing 4K content to consumers in the next 18 months?
post #1985 of 3670
4K would have really came in handy in last nights Packers-Seahawks game. Football will probably be the first TV broadcasts to start recording in 4K and then just down covert it to 1080p until there is enough user base to start ESPN 4K.

original.png
post #1986 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

I am not talking about a per GB cost. I am talking about a per UNIT cost. And I see nothing that even mentions Hollywood movies in your link. That's the point isn't it? Not some data backup system.
Cost will be the same or lower. Oh, now I have to estimate a unit cost on not released product. The sputtering physical vapor deposition (bluray method) has flaws in quality, so that increases cost. The data backup is what funds the media, that is huge market.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

So what about Televisions, BD players, AVRs, CBL/SAT/TELCO STBs, etc - when are they going to get DisplayPort?

DisplayPort has already made into the Professional Flat Panels. The video cards that I listed are Professional series video cards. Apple iPanel is rumored to have Thunderbolt (PCI Express with DisplayPort). This technology here from Sharp IGZO would have DisplayPort/Thunderbolt as connector.
http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.php?subaction=showfull&id=1347026339
BD players? Technology is old now! Although, you could use HDMI hub, that has thunderbolt. The problem with AVR's is that the technology changes every few years, but I have seen Thunderbolt on higher end products. (preamps)
This company here has a nice solution for 4k playback and it does have HDMI too. Thunderbolt too. http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/ultrastudio4k/
STB? I don't have a clue. Actually, I love to have the STB eliminated. Cable card was supposed to do that... There is about 100 products that are do out at the end of the year Thunderbolt.
If you talk to audio/video installer, they hate HDMI because of the problems with the distance between TV's. I also talked to a few about 4K and the current spec can't do 4k at higher frame rates. The problem with HDMI is that you need to upgrade the equipment. This is rather costly. I never upgraded for 3D, but to do my receiver it is $1000. The better solution would be base it on an optical cable, and just do firmware updates. The traditional fiber optical cable breaks at the connector. I have fiber to desk at work. Anyway, here is the thunderbolt optical cable.
http://www.macworld.com/article/1166542/optical_cables_for_thunderbolt_ports_shipped_by_sumitomo.html The cable is rather tiny, but it can pass audio and video. The cable can be bent too. The problem with HDMI as you go longer distances, then you need a bigger cable. HDMI was designed around copper, it works to some extent. Just I hope apple changes the technology.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Eventually all fiber . . how many decades will that take? And what relivance does that have with providing 4K content to consumers in the next 18 months?

Most of the population that is on the East coast has fiber now. Cable can do it now though, but Cable is slow to adopt. Cisco was briefing the cable companies 2 years ago, on upgrading their switches. The briefing stated 500 channels. http://www.ciscoknowledgenetwork.com/cable/documents/11_3G60_CKN_US_final.pdf?utm_source=&utm_medium=&utm_campaign=&PRIORITY_CODE= Intel started shipping these modems. http://www.lightreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=220955&site=lr_cable
I posted on Cisco, when this thread started. Cable & DSL companies are making lot of money, but don't want to upgrade their infrastructure.
Edited by Nitro67 - 9/25/12 at 8:31pm
post #1987 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

4K would have really came in handy in last nights Packers-Seahawks game. Football will probably be the first TV broadcasts to start recording in 4K and then just down covert it to 1080p until there is enough user base to start ESPN 4K.
original.png

Would have 4k helped? Probably not, that looks like you have shaking camera man.
post #1988 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Cost will be the same or lower. Oh, now I have to estimate a unit cost on not released product. The sputtering physical vapor deposition (bluray method) has flaws in quality, so that increases cost. The data backup is what funds the media, that is huge market.

It wasn't that way with DVD, the most successful consumer electronics product ever. Using your link, the AON HDS costs $132 per 1.2 TB disc ($.11 per GB) while we know the cost of a replicated BD-ROM with a Hollywood movie on it is $1.00.
Quote:
DisplayPort has already made into the Professional Flat Panels. The video cards that I listed are Professional series video cards. Apple iPanel is rumored to have Thunderbolt (PCI Express with DisplayPort). This technology here from Sharp IGZO would have DisplayPort/Thunderbolt as connector.
http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.php?subaction=showfull&id=1347026339
BD players? Technology is old now! Although, you could use HDMI hub, that has thunderbolt. The problem with AVR's is that the technology changes every few years, but I have seen Thunderbolt on higher end products. (preamps)
This company here has a nice solution for 4k playback and it does have HDMI too. Thunderbolt too. http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/ultrastudio4k/
STB? I don't have a clue. Actually, I love to have the STB eliminated. Cable card was supposed to do that... There is about 100 products that are do out at the end of the year Thunderbolt.
If you talk to audio/video installer, they hate HDMI because of the problems with the distance between TV's. I also talked to a few about 4K and the current spec can't do 4k at higher frame rates. The problem with HDMI is that you need to upgrade the equipment. This is rather costly. I never upgraded for 3D, but to do my receiver it is $1000. The better solution would be base it on an optical cable, and just do firmware updates. The traditional fiber optical cable breaks at the connector. I have fiber to desk at work. Anyway, here is the thunderbolt optical cable.
http://www.macworld.com/article/1166542/optical_cables_for_thunderbolt_ports_shipped_by_sumitomo.html The cable is rather tiny, but it can pass audio and video. The cable can be bent too. The problem with HDMI as you go longer distances, then you need a bigger cable. HDMI was designed around copper, it works to some extent. Just I hope apple changes the technology.

HDMI is releasing a new spec later this year that will address both higher rame rate 4K and 3D. Blu-ray is the best quality HD you can get today and you can get it literally at almost any retailer. I don't see that being "old technology."

Thunderbolt (codenamed Light Peak)[1] is an interface for connecting peripheral devices to a computer via an expansion bus.

Those new 84" 4KTVs, they have Thunderbolt? How about the Sony 4K projector?
Quote:
Most of the population that is on the East coast has fiber now.

Fiber to the home itself or just the main trunk lines in fiber?
Quote:
Cable can do it now though, but Cable is slow to adopt. Cisco was briefing the cable companies 2 years ago, on upgrading their switches. The briefing stated 500 channels. http://www.ciscoknowledgenetwork.com/cable/documents/11_3G60_CKN_US_final.pdf?utm_source=&utm_medium=&utm_campaign=&PRIORITY_CODE= Intel started shipping these modems. http://www.lightreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=220955&site=lr_cable
I posted on Cisco, when this thread started. Cable & DSL companies are making lot of money, but don't want to upgrade their infrastructure.

Study: US Broadband Adoption Levels off

http://www.pcworld.com/article/252234/study_us_broadband_adoption_levels_off.html
post #1989 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

It wasn't that way with DVD, the most successful consumer electronics product ever. Using your link, the AON HDS costs $132 per 1.2 TB disc ($.11 per GB) while we know the cost of a replicated BD-ROM with a Hollywood movie on it is $1.00.
AON is rather small business. Well, only 1 employee. Himself. So, his quote is not based on the mass market, but as you can see there is no backup now for 1.2TB. BDXL is around $100 a disc for 100GB. So that little business has just beat Sony. BDXL would cost $1200 for 1.2TB vs $132 per 1.2TB.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

HDMI is releasing a new spec later this year that will address both higher rame rate 4K and 3D.
The current spec can't do higher frame rate with 4k and 3D. So, I would have hated to buy a Sony Projector to find that out. Again, you are stuck buying new equipment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Thunderbolt (codenamed Light Peak)[1] is an interface for connecting peripheral devices to a computer via an expansion bus.
Thunderbolt is being developed by several companies, and currently there is around 100 devices out there. Lynx Studio, Universal Audio, etc. In the past, we had changers for large media collections, but now it is becoming a digital format. How does this relate for 4k, well, DisplayPort 1.2 allows for 120fps for 4k. Can you do that with the current format of HDMI? Nope! The RED Player prototype allows 4K playback at up to 120FPS over 4X simultaneous HDMI outputs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Those new 84" 4KTVs, they have Thunderbolt? How about the Sony 4K projector?
Actually, I am not interested in the new 84" 4k TV's. If I do buy a 4K Tv, it will be a Sharp or Apple. Apple is now working with Sharp. Sony Projector can't do the framerates now with 1.4 HDMI.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Fiber to the home itself or just the main trunk lines in fiber?
Fiber to the home. A company called Verizon FIOS.

Here is a good article on Fiber to the Home in the USA. At least this article attaches numbers with people with Fiber.
http://www.lightwaveonline.com/articles/2012/09/ftth-council-americas-release-ftth-market-numbers.html

I am not sure why you posted the article from PC Mag, it really doesn't tell me anything about fiber. I tend to quit reading the article, when it starts posting a percentage.
Edited by Nitro67 - 9/26/12 at 4:51pm
post #1990 of 3670
Well after the good news about Haswell supporting 4K output over HDMI and 4K video acceleration there is now some bad news in regards to AMD's Trinity. Anandtech has reported that AMD's Trinity will not support 4K output over HDMI and the article states that:
Quote:
...
The video industry is pushing 4K and it makes more sense to a lot of people compared to the 3D push. 4K should see a much faster rate of adoption compared to 3D, but Trinity seems to have missed the boat here. AMD's Southern Islands as well as NVIDIA's Kepler GPUs support 4K output over HDMI, but Trinity doesn't have 4K video decode acceleration or 4K display output over HDMI.
...
post #1991 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

Well after the good news about Haswell supporting 4K output over HDMI and 4K video acceleration there is now some bad news in regards to AMD's Trinity. Anandtech has reported that AMD's Trinity will not support 4K output over HDMI and the article states that:

If you are building an HTPC, then you can also select the Professional series cards from AMD (Firepro) or Nvidia K5000. They can do 4k too, at less power drain than the consumer cards. So, then you can use a passive power supply. (Kingwin is limited to 600Watts Overclock mode for the power supply. Kingwin is 500watts but has overclock mode.) I have an HTPC now with Ivybridge, and H4000. I am still undecided on 4k video, but I did plan to upgrade the video card in the future for 4k. How to keep it quiet? I use a hybrid liquid cooler. (ARCTIC Accelero Hybrid).
Edited by Nitro67 - 9/28/12 at 7:22am
post #1992 of 3670
Toshiba to Launch 3 4K TVs In 2013
Quote:
Washington, D.C. (September 27, 2012) -- Toshiba said today that it will launch three new 4K HDTVs next year, sets that purport to offer four times the resolution of today's HDTVs.

IDG News Service reports that Toshiba will begin selling the sets in the spring of 2013. The sets will be an 84-inch model, one in the 60-inch range and another over 50 inches. (Pricing was not revealed.)

http://www.tvpredictions.com/toshiba092712.htm
post #1993 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Toshiba to Launch 3 4K TVs In 2013
http://www.tvpredictions.com/toshiba092712.htm

Well obviously LG is making their 84" and I think it was AUO that was making their 55" ZL2 panel, so who is making their 50" and 60" panels? Sharp had a 60" 4K prototype at CES this year.
post #1994 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

Well obviously LG is making their 84" and I think it was AUO that was making their 55" ZL2 panel, so who is making their 50" and 60" panels? Sharp had a 60" 4K prototype at CES this year.

One of the three TVs will be an 84-inch model, one will be in the 60-inch range and the third in the 50-inch range. Pricing will also be announced closer to launch but will be competitive with other companies, Fukakushi said.

Prototypes of Toshiba's 4K TVs are expected to be on show at next week's Ceatec exhibition in Makuhari, just outside of Tokyo. Ceatec opens on Tuesday.


http://www.cio.com/article/717388/Toshiba_Plans_Three_4K_TVs_Next_Year
post #1995 of 3670
DIRECTV: All Channels Will Be HD In 2016
Quote:
Washington, D.C. (October 1, 2012) -- A top DIRECTV executive says the satcaster plans to offer all channels in High-Definition by 2016.

That's according to an article by advanced-television.com.

The web site says Philip J. Goswitz, DIRECTV's senior vice president for space and communications, told last month's Euroconsult conference that all standard-def channels would be converted to HDTV by 2016 using local-into-local Ka-Band capacity.

He added that with standard-def transmissions converted to high-def, it would free up 1 gigahertz of satellite spectrum for upcoming Ultra HD signals, now better known as 4K. Consequently, Goswitz predicted that DIRECTV would begin offering Ultra HD in four years.

The 4K standard purports to offer four times the resolution of current HDTVs. However, most picture technology experts say the improvement can not be seen without a screen at least 60 inches in diagonal.

http://www.tvpredictions.com/dhd100112.htm
post #1996 of 3670
These are the same DirecTV people who have footdragged on offering core channels in HD for many, many years? I'll believe it when I see it. AMC just became available in HD recently on DirecTV. Cooking Channel, among many others, still isn't. Hard to take them seriously on this topic.
post #1997 of 3670
Goswitz allready said in march at the Satellite 2012 event that DirectTV will adopt Ultra-HDTv.
http://advanced-television.com/index.php/2012/03/15/directv-planning-for-u-hdtv/
post #1998 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

Goswitz allready said in march at the Satellite 2012 event that DirectTV will adopt Ultra-HDTv.
http://advanced-television.com/index.php/2012/03/15/directv-planning-for-u-hdtv/

And now we have a timeframe - 4 years from now
post #1999 of 3670
post #2000 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart 

And now we have a timeframe - 4 years from now
Well, with the one hand he says that he expects to start Ultra-HDTV in about four years. With the other hand he is saying that he hopes that things are going to evolve more quickly this time around ( it took high-definition 7 years - 1998-2005). So 4 years might as well be 8 years smile.gif
http://advanced-television.com/2012/10/01/37560/

All he is saying is that ''we are wanting to have it in place'' when Ultra-HD is adopted.
post #2001 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

Well, with the one hand he says that he expects to start Ultra-HDTV in about four years. With the other hand he is saying that he hopes that things are going to evolve more quickly this time around ( it took high-definition 7 years - 1998-2005). So 4 years might as well be 8 years smile.gif
http://advanced-television.com/2012/10/01/37560/
All he is saying is that ''we are wanting to have it in place'' when Ultra-HD is adopted.

Will the fact that there will be no native 4k content hold back UHDTV adoption? I think so.
post #2002 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart 

Will the fact that there will be no native 4k content hold back UHDTV adoption? I think so.

that might be the case, nevertheless, Witz is saying that once there are enough folks with 4K stuff Direct.tv will start broadcasting Ultra-HD.
post #2003 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Will the fact that there will be no native 4k content hold back UHDTV adoption? I think so.

Even if there is no prerecorded 4K2K content, it would seem possible to capture live sporting events in 4K2K by placing suitable cameras at game venues...?! cool.gif
_
post #2004 of 3670
Before 1080p was available, it was quite common for enthusiasts to upscale analog SD signals to a higher display resolution when using CRT projectors. While the advantages of displaying digitally at 4K instead of 1080p are much less, I'd expect some of them to be similar. Using more than 8 bits per color channel probably would be appropriate in order to maximize the quality of the interpolated pixels.
post #2005 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Even if there is no prerecorded 4K2K content, it would seem possible to capture live sporting events in 4K2K by placing suitable cameras at game venues...?! cool.gif
_

Yep. I fully expect ESPN 4K by early 2016, along with a few 4K movie on demand channels. As long as a movie was shot on film it can be converted to 4K. And anything shot digital is most likely already 4K. The movie studios can not wait to sell you another copy of movies you already own that are in the studio libraries. The hardest ones to convert are going to be the Television studios. Most just finally switched to 1080p a few years ago.
post #2006 of 3670
Sytech,

Unfortunately, you're overly optimistic about the resolutions of current digital movies. While many new films are recorded at 4K or better using high-end RED cameras, many are being recorded using 2K. ARRI's web site includes a blurb for their 2K editing room, for example.
post #2007 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Even if there is no prerecorded 4K2K content, it would seem possible to capture live sporting events in 4K2K by placing suitable cameras at game venues...?! cool.gif
_

And how are you going to get those camera feeds to consumers?
post #2008 of 3670
Initially to dedicated venues, I'm sure. Many movieplexes have one-time-only special events. I'm sure some will be delighted to provide special 4K experiences. For a very special fee. wink.gif

[special opportunity mode on]
You, too, will be provided the opportunity to purchase a souvenir 4K recording. Oh, you don't have a compatible player? We'll even rent you one. For another special fee....!
[special opportunity mode off]

This could be one way to find out how many non-enthusiasts might actually be interested in 4K or 8K presentations. After all, it was the advent of quality 3D movies which spurred the current enthusiasm (such as it is) for 3D home entertainment.
post #2009 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Initially to dedicated venues, I'm sure. Many movieplexes have one-time-only special events. I'm sure some will be delighted to provide special 4K experiences. For a very special fee. wink.gif
[special opportunity mode on]
You, too, will be provided the opportunity to purchase a souvenir 4K recording. Oh, you don't have a compatible player? We'll even rent you one. For another special fee....!
[special opportunity mode off]
This could be one way to find out how many non-enthusiasts might actually be interested in 4K or 8K presentations. After all, it was the advent of quality 3D movies which spurred the current enthusiasm (such as it is) for 3D home entertainment.

3D TV: Biggest Bomb Ever?
Quote:
By Swanni

Washington, D.C. (October 1, 2012) -- Despite nearly three years of heavy investment in 3D TVs by TV makers, fewer than 115,000 Americans watch 3D TV channels at any one time.

That's according to an article by the Associated Press.

The wire service adds that the number of 3D viewers is so small that Nielsen is unable to effectively measure them.The 115,000 viewers would represent less than a hundredth of the 20 million viewers who watched NCIS last week, AP writes.

IHS Screen Digest says only two percent of TVs in the United States are capable of displaying 3D programming, which represents roughly 7 million out of the 331 million in U.S. homes.

"We learned with every passing day that we were ahead of the curve further than we thought we were," ESPN's Bryan Burns, whose network launched ESPN 3D two years ago, tells AP. "We hit the on-ramp earlier than we realized at the time."

DIRECTV, another early leader in the 3D TV movement, has reduced its full-time 3D channel (n3D) to part-time. On some days, the satcaster may not show any 3D programming on the channel.

http://www.tvpredictions.com/3d100112.htm
post #2010 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Even if there is no prerecorded 4K2K content, it would seem possible to capture live sporting events in 4K2K by placing suitable cameras at game venues...?! cool.gif

And how are you going to get those camera feeds to consumers?

Without the ATSC 3.0 standard in place, we appear to be limited to proprietary broadcast distribution channels with 4K2K content from, e.g., a DBS decoder box delivered over HDMI to a 4K2K display. This would seem to be a likely future scenario given DIRECTV's expressed 'commitment' to UHDTV and their current 2012 NFL Sunday Ticket 'premium product' strategy.

Which would seem to beg the more important question: How soon might we expect to see a 'near final' draft ATSC 3.0 standard?
_
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Flat Panels General and OLED Technology › 4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts?