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4k by 2k or Quad HD...lots of rumors? thoughts? - Page 68

post #2011 of 3670
[CEATEC 2012] Sharp ICC-LED 4K TV is what we have all been waiting for!

http://en.akihabaranews.com/119179/home-entertainment/ceatec-2012-sharp-icc-led-4k-tv-is-what-we-have-all-been-waiting-for
post #2012 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Without the ATSC 3.0 standard in place, we appear to be limited to proprietary broadcast distribution channels with 4K2K content from, e.g., a DBS decoder box delivered over HDMI to a 4K2K display. This would seem to be a likely future scenario given DIRECTV's expressed 'commitment' to UHDTV and their current 2012 NFL Sunday Ticket 'premium product' strategy.

Which we are being told will be 4 years in the future.
Quote:
Which would seem to beg the more important question: How soon might we expect to see a 'near final' draft ATSC 3.0 standard?
_

Unknown. Just like the timeframe for implementing ATSC 3.0
post #2013 of 3670
Toshiba pushes 4K REGZA HDTVs at CEATEC 2012

http://www.ubergizmo.com/2012/10/toshiba-4k-regza-hdtvs/
post #2014 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Which we are being told will be 4 years in the future.

Your question was "how are you going to get those camera feeds to consumers?". If you wanted to know "when", you should have asked that question instead...
post #2015 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Initially to dedicated venues, I'm sure. Many movieplexes have one-time-only special events. I'm sure some will be delighted to provide special 4K experiences. For a very special fee. wink.gif
[special opportunity mode on]
You, too, will be provided the opportunity to purchase a souvenir 4K recording. Oh, you don't have a compatible player? We'll even rent you one. For another special fee....!
[special opportunity mode off]
This could be one way to find out how many non-enthusiasts might actually be interested in 4K or 8K presentations. After all, it was the advent of quality 3D movies which spurred the current enthusiasm (such as it is) for 3D home entertainment.

And this benefits the owner of a 84" LG 4KTV how?
post #2016 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Your question was "how are you going to get those camera feeds to consumers?". If you wanted to know "when", you should have asked that question instead...

How and when go hand in hand.
post #2017 of 3670
Quote:
Initially to dedicated venues, I'm sure. Many movieplexes have one-time-only special events. I'm sure some will be delighted to provide special 4K experiences. For a very special fee. wink.gif
[special opportunity mode on]
You, too, will be provided the opportunity to purchase a souvenir 4K recording. Oh, you don't have a compatible player? We'll even rent you one. For another special fee....!
[special opportunity mode off]
This could be one way to find out how many non-enthusiasts might actually be interested in 4K or 8K presentations. After all, it was the advent of quality 3D movies which spurred the current enthusiasm (such as it is) for 3D home entertainment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And this benefits the owner of a 84" LG 4KTV how?
They will be able to use it to view their "souvenir 4K recording" (assuming they have/rent the 4K player) smile.gif
post #2018 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

They will be able to use it to view their "souvenir 4K recording" (assuming they have/rent the 4K player) smile.gif

You ever see a "Souvenir HD recording" for any of the special venue shows that are put on in movie theaters today? There aren't any. Just like there won't be if they decided to move up to 4K. Movie theaters show movies and special venues. They don't sell such to consumers.
post #2019 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

You ever see a "Souvenir HD recording" for any of the special venue shows that are put on in movie theaters today? There aren't any. Just like there won't be if they decided to move up to 4K. Movie theaters show movies and special venues. They don't sell such to consumers.
Well there was "8K" 2012 Olympics demos at special venues. This month there will be HD versions of it (welll longer than the demos) on Blu-ray on sale.

Also, he gave a new idea, one that might not have been done before with HD, you can't say for certain that no one will do that with 4K/8K.

The BBC has also broadcast shows in HD & 3D to special cinemas as well as in HD to viewers at home in 3D.
Edited by Joe Bloggs - 10/2/12 at 7:11pm
post #2020 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundChex View Post

Without the ATSC 3.0 standard in place, we appear to be limited to proprietary broadcast distribution channels with 4K2K content from, e.g., a DBS decoder box delivered over HDMI to a 4K2K display. This would seem to be a likely future scenario given DIRECTV's expressed 'commitment' to UHDTV and their current 2012 NFL Sunday Ticket 'premium product' strategy.
Which would seem to beg the more important question: How soon might we expect to see a 'near final' draft ATSC 3.0 standard?
_

You're kidding right? ATSC (of any version) is a joke and everyone knows it. It will have absolutely zero impact on UHDTV.

Ron
post #2021 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

Well there was "8K" 2012 Olympics demos at special venues. This month there will be HD versions of it (welll longer than the demos) on Blu-ray on sale.

Not the same is it? Nor could you buy that BD when leaving the NHK 8K demo
Quote:
Also, he gave a new idea, one that might not have been done before with HD, you can't say for certain that no one will do that with 4K/8K.

A new idea that will go over like a lead balloon. . . . theaters selling content to consumers. And yes, I can say for certain it will never happen because it hasn't in the past - ever. 4K/8K isn't going to change that policy.
Quote:
The BBC has also broadcast shows in HD & 3D to special cinemas as well as in HD to viewers at home in 3D.

Usining existing infrastructure. The idea is that with 4K, there is no infrastructure.
post #2022 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Not the same is it? Nor could you buy that BD when leaving the NHK 8K demo
A new idea that will go over like a lead balloon. . . . theaters selling content to consumers. And yes, I can say for certain it will never happen because it hasn't in the past - ever. 4K/8K isn't going to change that policy.
Usining existing infrastructure. The idea is that with 4K, there is no infrastructure.
It's more or less the same thing. I think everything that was in the "8K" demos will be on the discs - except the resolution. It's the event (Olympics) not the SHV content they will be buying.

I think the problem with selling something at the event itself is you couldn't buy it and take it away at the event, because they'd probably need time to edit/encode it/write it to disc or other media.
post #2023 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

It's more or less the same thing. I think everything that was in the "8K" demos will be on the discs - except the resolution. It's the event (Olympics) not the SHV content they will be buying.

Right - which has been done before, numerous times and always using the current consumer home video platforms. So by you saying "except the resolution" then it isn't the same.
Quote:
I think the problem with selling something at the event itself is you couldn't buy it and take it away at the event, because they'd probably need time to edit/encode it/write it to disc or other media.

Just another reason why it will never happen.
post #2024 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Right - which has been done before, numerous times and always using the current consumer home video platforms. So by you saying "except the resolution" then it isn't the same.
Just another reason why it will never happen.
It's a "special event" shown at special venues which you specifically said
Quote:
They don't sell such to consumers.

Now you've changed to say it has " has been done before, numerous times" - just that the consumer isn't getting the full resolution. I never said the consumer got the exact same resolution they get at the special event showing - just that they could buy it which you said they couldn't.
post #2025 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

It's a "special event" shown at special venues which you specifically said
Now you've changed to say it has " has been done before, numerous times" - just that the consumer isn't getting the full resolution. I never said the consumer got the exact same resolution they get at the special event showing - just that they could buy it which you said they couldn't.

I said they couldn't buy it at the special event itself. And you agreed with me.

Why would theaters promote a 4K home video product?
post #2026 of 3670
While commercial theater owners obviously can't help but see the home theater market as serious competition, the people providing the content don't always seem to agree with that point of view. Musicians usually sell discs of their music at their live performances, for example. They certainly seem to do a brisk business at our local live theater venue during intermissions and after the shows.

I can imagine (although I don't know how realistic the idea is) that something similar might be done with 4K or 8K on-screen performances. It needn't be a recording of what was just experienced, although I can imagine that being a selling point. Getting a fraction of the "disc" sale price at-the-door seems to me to be better than getting none at all as is currently the case. (I put disc in quotes since at this point it's not at all obvious what the physical media might actually be.)

I brought up the possibility of high-resolution in-theater sporting events at lunch today. The sports fans didn't think it would be particularly attractive since alcoholic beverages wouldn't be allowed smile.gif
post #2027 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

While commercial theater owners obviously can't help but see the home theater market as serious competition, the people providing the content don't always seem to agree with that point of view. Musicians usually sell discs of their music at their live performances, for example. They certainly seem to do a brisk business at our local live theater venue during intermissions and after the shows.
I can imagine (although I don't know how realistic the idea is) that something similar might be done with 4K or 8K on-screen performances. It needn't be a recording of what was just experienced, although I can imagine that being a selling point. Getting a fraction of the "disc" sale price at-the-door seems to me to be better than getting none at all as is currently the case. (I put disc in quotes since at this point it's not at all obvious what the physical media might actually be.)

How are you going to shoot something in UltraHD then author it (melding video with sound) compress it and replicate it 200X right on the spot? And do it in less than 15 seconds per copy.
Quote:
I brought up the possibility of high-resolution in-theater sporting events at lunch today. The sports fans didn't think it would be particularly attractive since alcoholic beverages wouldn't be allowed smile.gif

Your friends were incorrect. There have been a number of sports venues shown in digital theaters like boxing matches and basketball games - all have been considered successful.
post #2028 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

DIRECTV: All Channels Will Be HD In 2016

Quote:
Washington, D.C. (October 1, 2012) -- A top DIRECTV executive says the satcaster plans to offer all channels in High-Definition by 2016.

That's according to an article by advanced-television.com.

The web site says Philip J. Goswitz, DIRECTV's senior vice president for space and communications, told last month's Euroconsult conference that all standard-def channels would be converted to HDTV by 2016 using local-into-local Ka-Band capacity.

He added that with standard-def transmissions converted to high-def, it would free up 1 gigahertz of satellite spectrum for upcoming Ultra HD signals, now better known as 4K. Consequently, Goswitz predicted that DIRECTV would begin offering Ultra HD in four years.

The 4K standard purports to offer four times the resolution of current HDTVs. However, most picture technology experts say the improvement can not be seen without a screen at least 60 inches in diagonal.

http://www.tvpredictions.com/dhd100112.htm


http://www.tvpredictions.com/dhd100112.htm


Back in the day, there was other options besides Directv and Dish Network to receive HDTV. One was BUD (Big Ugly Dish) C-Band. You won't see C-band, but the other options are KU and KA band. The people that buy a 4k TV will probably have this option available to them for Free To Air (FTA) broadcasting.
Actually, this is the format that SES used with ASTRA and the Sony demo. http://www.satellitetoday.com/via/features/Compression-Technology-In-the-Next-Generation-Broadcast-Environment_39299.html

Picture quality will be much better with a bigger dish, that is if you are allowed to have one in your neighborhood.
post #2029 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

How are you going to shoot something in UltraHD then author it (melding video with sound) compress it and replicate it 200X right on the spot? And do it in less than 15 seconds per copy.
If it's being streamed, that same compressed signal could be used to write as many copies as the replication device(s) could handle simultaneously, with immediate availability after the showing. If too few copies were made, they could be available later -- either shipped to a home address or for pickup on-site. If it's not live, copies could be prepared ahead of time, with the same provisions if too few are on hand.

Doing the replication for an attractive price might be a challenge. It certainly seems like it would be technically feasible. Whether a workable business model could be developed is another matter.
post #2030 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

If it's being streamed, that same compressed signal could be used to write as many copies as the replication device(s) could handle simultaneously, with immediate availability after the showing. If too few copies were made, they could be available later -- either shipped to a home address or for pickup on-site. If it's not live, copies could be prepared ahead of time, with the same provisions if too few are on hand.
Doing the replication for an attractive price might be a challenge. It certainly seems like it would be technically feasible. Whether a workable business model could be developed is another matter.

And if it is being streamed using Motion JPEG2000?
post #2031 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

If it's being streamed, that same compressed signal could be used to write as many copies as the replication device(s) could handle simultaneously, with immediate availability after the showing. If too few copies were made, they could be available later -- either shipped to a home address or for pickup on-site. If it's not live, copies could be prepared ahead of time, with the same provisions if too few are on hand.
Doing the replication for an attractive price might be a challenge. It certainly seems like it would be technically feasible. Whether a workable business model could be developed is another matter.

And if it is being streamed using Motion JPEG2000?

The choice of streaming technology would have to be part of the business plan.
post #2032 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 

Back in the day, there was other options besides Directv and Dish Network to receive HDTV. One was BUD (Big Ugly Dish) C-Band. You won't see C-band, but the other options are KU and KA band. The people that buy a 4k TV will probably have this option available to them for Free To Air (FTA) broadcasting.
Actually, this is the format that SES used with ASTRA and the Sony demo. http://www.satellitetoday.com/via/features/Compression-Technology-In-the-Next-Generation-Broadcast-Environment_39299.html

Picture quality will be much better with a bigger dish, that is if you are allowed to have one in your neighborhood.
You will get no better picture quality when using a bigger dish. When weather gets severe signal will disappear sooner on a smaller dish(keep in mind that there are also high quality dishes out there who will outperform bigger low quality dishes) ,_ this and being able to receive more satellites is the only advantage of a bigger dish.
post #2033 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

You will get no better picture quality when using a bigger dish. When weather gets severe signal will disappear sooner on a smaller dish(keep in mind that there are also high quality dishes out there who will outperform bigger low quality dishes) ,_ this and being able to receive more satellites is the only advantage of a bigger dish.

Wrong again! http://orbitsat.net/Support/HDTV.htm This is for C-Band. " What is the difference between C-Band High Definition and small dish High Definition?"

The source of small dish programming, with the exception of certain pay-per-view movie channels, is from C-Band TV originated signals. Small dish companies, like cable companies, capture the C-Band TV Master Broadcast Quality signal encode it, compress it, and rebroadcast it in a secondary format. All this signal manipulation naturally results in compromised picture quality. HD broadcasts will be handled in the same manner. To provide a premium movie channel on a small dish, the small dish programmer will capture it from the C-Band TV Master Broadcast Quality, encode, compress and rebroadcast the program."
I almost bought a C-Band dish back around 2001. I live in a house that has huge backyard, and I can put up that type dish. Motorola was making 4DTV boxes back then. C-band equipment cost was rather expensive, so most homes went with Directv or Dish network. I had both Directv and Dish network. Picture quality was fine, but lot of compression. I would probably go with KA band for UHDTV, but based on commercial company. The monthly costs for the encrypted channels actually is cheaper than Directv or Dish network.

The point of the previous post is that you don't have to wait for Directv. KA satellites are being launched now, not 4 years from now. So, you need to find the right satellite provider to get you UHDTV, and here is a list of the satellites. http://www.lyngsat.com/launches/ka.html
post #2034 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

The point of the previous post is that you don't have to wait for Directv. KA satellites are being launched now, not 4 years from now. So, you need to find the right satellite provider to get you UHDTV, and here is a list of the satellites. http://www.lyngsat.com/launches/ka.html

That doesn't tell us when any UHDTV broadcasts will begin. Plus, aren't you going to need some kind of a UHDTV SAT STB to go with your BUD?
post #2035 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 

Wrong again! http://orbitsat.net/Support/HDTV.htm This is for C-Band. " What is the difference between C-Band High Definition and small dish High Definition?"
''wrong again!''? Was not the ''who owns the blu-ray patents'' issue, was it tongue.gif

In general you will not get a better PQ when you use a bigger dish, that is what my post was about.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 

The source of small dish programming, with the exception of certain pay-per-view movie channels, is from C-Band TV originated signals. Small dish companies, like cable companies, capture the C-Band TV Master Broadcast Quality signal encode it, compress it, and rebroadcast it in a secondary format. All this signal manipulation naturally results in compromised picture quality. HD broadcasts will be handled in the same manner. To provide a premium movie channel on a small dish, the small dish programmer will capture it from the C-Band TV Master Broadcast Quality, encode, compress and rebroadcast the program."
I almost bought a C-Band dish back around 2001. I live in a house that has huge backyard, and I can put up that type dish. Motorola was making 4DTV boxes back then. C-band equipment cost was rather expensive, so most homes went with Directv or Dish network. I had both Directv and Dish network. Picture quality was fine, but lot of compression. I would probably go with KA band for UHDTV, but based on commercial company. The monthly costs for the encrypted channels actually is cheaper than Directv or Dish network.

The point of the previous post is that you don't have to wait for Directv. KA satellites are being launched now, not 4 years from now. So, you need to find the right satellite provider to get you UHDTV, and here is a list of the satellites. http://www.lyngsat.com/launches/ka.html
post #2036 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

That doesn't tell us when any UHDTV broadcasts will begin. Plus, aren't you going to need some kind of a UHDTV SAT STB to go with your BUD?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

That doesn't tell us when any UHDTV broadcasts will begin. Plus, aren't you going to need some kind of a UHDTV SAT STB to go with your BUD?

Actually, the link tells you what is available in your area. For example, 8mile13 is in Europe, if I recall correctly. SES has Europe covered with satellites, but he have to do some research on what satellites are available to him. USA is not as well covered as Europe. Although,
this Galaxy 13 is very interesting. http://www.lyngsat.com/tvchannels/us/3net.html This satellite has 3net, which is owned by Imax, Discovery and Sony. "Launched on February 13, 2011, 3net, the joint venture of Sony Corporation, Discovery Communications and IMAX Corporation brings together three of the world's leading media, technology and entertainment companies to provide the nation's first and only fully programmed, 24/7 3D network. The three partners deliver an extraordinary collection of award-winning 3D content, technology and production expertise, television distribution and operational strength to the project, with a mission to bring viewers the highest quality and most immersive in-home 3D viewing experience possible. The channel features the most extensive library of 3D content in the world, featuring genres that are most appealing in 3D, including natural history, documentary, action/adventure, travel, history, kids and family, lifestyle and cuisine, concerts, movies, scripted series and more. "

Well, Sony already said that they will be delivery 4k to the home, so I say that this network would be one of the candidates for UHDTV. http://www.lyngsat.com/tvchannels/us/3net.html This link also tells me on the system that satellite uses currently, so you need to talk with your satellite provider. They can set you up with the set top box. You can receiver UHDTV 4k via h.264 compression... http://www.astrodesign.co.jp/english/news/news-20120508-1571.html That transmission was via KU band, but the industry seems to moving to KA band. Oh, Astro has a American location as well. http://astro-americas.com/ If you bought a dish setup now, you have to go with h.264, but by 2014 then h.265 set top boxes will be available.
post #2037 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

''wrong again!''? Was not the ''who owns the blu-ray patents'' issue, was it tongue.gif
In general you will not get a better PQ when you use a bigger dish, that is what my post was about.

Bluray patents is the original inventors. There is 4 different inventors and Sony wasn't among any of the inventors. Most companies do try to lay claim to the patent issue...depends on the country.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

In general you will not get a better PQ when you use a bigger dish, that is what my post was about.

I seen C-Band and had excellent picture quality. I had Dish Network, Directv, AT&T Uverse, and Time Warner Cable. All of them have issues with the compression or artifacts in the picture. Directv was the best, but their customer service is horrible. Expect a day wait to get serviced, and that is if the show up at all. I had them to cancel after I waited all day for them. The people that drop 25K for a new TV will use a commercial satellite dish. Their home theaters are around 100K+, so they want best around. No fiber, then you have to do satellite.
My home theater installer has been installing 4k projectors since they were released. Actually, one of his customers went CES 2011, and he saw a 4k Flat panel. He wanted it for his home, regardless of the cost.
Edited by Nitro67 - 10/4/12 at 8:22pm
post #2038 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro67 View Post

Actually, the link tells you what is available in your area. For example, 8mile13 is in Europe, if I recall correctly. SES has Europe covered with satellites, but he have to do some research on what satellites are available to him. USA is not as well covered as Europe. Although,
this Galaxy 13 is very interesting. http://www.lyngsat.com/tvchannels/us/3net.html This satellite has 3net, which is owned by Imax, Discovery and Sony. "Launched on February 13, 2011, 3net, the joint venture of Sony Corporation, Discovery Communications and IMAX Corporation brings together three of the world's leading media, technology and entertainment companies to provide the nation's first and only fully programmed, 24/7 3D network. The three partners deliver an extraordinary collection of award-winning 3D content, technology and production expertise, television distribution and operational strength to the project, with a mission to bring viewers the highest quality and most immersive in-home 3D viewing experience possible. The channel features the most extensive library of 3D content in the world, featuring genres that are most appealing in 3D, including natural history, documentary, action/adventure, travel, history, kids and family, lifestyle and cuisine, concerts, movies, scripted series and more. "

What has all this to do with 4K UHDTV? Absolutely nothing. rolleyes.gif
Quote:
Well, Sony already said that they will be delivery 4k to the home, so I say that this network would be one of the candidates for UHDTV.

No it isn't. That's a 3D network. Has nothing to do with UHDTV. Sony says a lot of things and many of them don't pan out.
Quote:
http://www.lyngsat.com/tvchannels/us/3net.html This link also tells me on the system that satellite uses currently, so you need to talk with your satellite provider. They can set you up with the set top box. You can receiver UHDTV 4k via h.264 compression... http://www.astrodesign.co.jp/english/news/news-20120508-1571.html That transmission was via KU band, but the industry seems to moving to KA band. Oh, Astro has a American location as well. http://astro-americas.com/ If you bought a dish setup now, you have to go with h.264, but by 2014 then h.265 set top boxes will be available.

There is no one currently broadcasting in UHDTV via SAT. There is no one offerring any UHDTV SAT receiving equipment. THOSE are the facts of the current status of UHDTV via SAT.
post #2039 of 3670
IHS iSuppli: 4K TV Will See Small Marginal Share
Quote:
Consumer demand for 4K TV sets — or sets that offer 3,840 by 2,160 pixel resolution, four times 1080p — will remain marginal for years to come, never gaining for than 1% of the global LCD market through 2017, according to a new IHS iSuppli forecast.

The research firm is expecting a mere 4,000 4K TVs to be shipped in 2012, and that number will grow to 2.1 million in 2017, when it will still only represent 0.8% of global LCD TV shipments. This despite the fact 4K has garnered lots of press and attention, with Sony Electronics announcing an 84-inch 4K set ($25,000) and LG Electronics launching an 84-inch 4K ($20,000). Toshiba Corp. is offering a 55-inch model ($10,000).

“If you have a television that is 60 inches or larger and are watching video that has a 3,840 by 2,160 resolution, then a 4K television makes sense,” said Tom Morrod, director of TV systems and technology research for IHS. “However, a very limited amount of content is available at the 4K resolution. Meanwhile, because of high prices and other issues, the market for super-sized, 60-inch and larger sets is very small — at only about 1.5% of total television shipments in 2012.”

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/hdtv/ihs-isuppli-4k-tv-will-see-small-marginal-share-28504
post #2040 of 3670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

What has all this to do with 4K UHDTV? Absolutely nothing. rolleyes.gif

That is just one example, but a few of the other networks are HBO, Starz, Turner, etc. You need content to view 4k.
Here is the line up of 3D satellites. http://www.lyngsat.com/3d/index.html
Astra is owned by SES, Astra 3B was used for the demo. http://itersnews.com/?p=12259
Interesting networks on Astra 3B......
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

No it isn't. That's a 3D network. Has nothing to do with UHDTV. Sony says a lot of things and many of them don't pan out.

UHDTV is 3d at 4k and 8k resolution. Imax has large library of videos at 4k, and so does Sony. and Discovery. Galaxy 13 satellite is KU, but if Sony uses 50 Mb/sec. Then I say it could be capable of 4k. There is huge investment to start broadcasting in 4k.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

There is no one currently broadcasting in UHDTV via SAT. There is no one offerring any UHDTV SAT receiving equipment. THOSE are the facts of the current status of UHDTV via SAT.
No references to back up your claims.
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