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Lexicon Balanced Output Option - Page 2

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fastl View Post

Teflon based substrates are typically used in RF printed circuit boards designs, where you are trying to minimize dielectric losses and exploit the lower dielectric constant of Teflon. At audio frequencies, there is no particular advantage to Teflon board material, and it certainly doesn't sound "better". That's total nonsense, like many "audiophile" beliefs. Regular old FR4 board material (epoxy glass) is mechanically more robust and also costs a lot less. And that's not Boston Baked Beans talking, either!

Just to say that DACs deal with not only audio, but high frequency digital signals, and while the bitrates are not outlandish by computer standards, the rise times of the square waves want to be essentially zero. When they are not, as is a result of stray capacitance, could it not become a possible sources of jitter? Whether this is a real issue or not, I do not know.
post #32 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Just to say that DACs deal with not only audio, but high frequency digital signals, and while the bitrates are not outlandish by computer standards, the rise times of the square waves want to be essentially zero. When they are not, as is a result of stray capacitance, could it not become a possible sources of jitter? Whether this is a real issue or not, I do not know.

Likewise throwing a few file folders out of the WTC towers top floor delayed the collapase. Hey, it did reduce the gross weight, right?
post #33 of 35
While theoretical square-waves have infinite frequency response and zero rise time, real world digital signals do not. Real world integrated circuit chips generate the signals and these chips have intentionally limited high frequency response.
post #34 of 35
....a result of stray capacitance, could it not become a possible sources of jitter? Whether this is a real issue or not, I do not know.....

It's not a real issue. If it was, I wouldn't have made the comment. There's stray capacitance on Teflon PWBs as well as on FR4 PWBs. Jitter is caused by phase modulation of the DAC clock. Symbol jitter on the data input side of the DAC is -not- what results in the analog signal "jitter" at the output (what you're referring to). It's caused primarily by noise contamination of the clock signal.
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fastl View Post

....a result of stray capacitance, could it not become a possible sources of jitter? Whether this is a real issue or not, I do not know.....

It's not a real issue. If it was, I wouldn't have made the comment. There's stray capacitance on Teflon PWBs as well as on FR4 PWBs. Jitter is caused by phase modulation of the DAC clock. Symbol jitter on the data input side of the DAC is -not- what results in the analog signal "jitter" at the output (what you're referring to). It's caused primarily by noise contamination of the clock signal.

Good to know. Thanks!
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